Wednesday’s QPR quiz

first_imgTest your knowledge by seeing how many of these five QPR-related questions you can answer correctly.[wp-simple-survey-102] 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Stone Tools May Be Crocodile Stomach Stones

first_img“Were crocodiles responsible for the stones we call tools?” is the title of a surprising letter to the editor in Nature last week.1  Patrick Dempsey (the archaeologist, not the actor) raised a possibility that paleoanthropologists and the journals have been making a big mistake for a long time.  He asked, “Could Nature have been unknowingly publishing papers for the past 80 years about crocodilian gastroliths (stomach stones) instead of stones concluded to be 2.5-million-year-old hominid tools?”    Surely anthropologists have thought of this and know how to tell the difference, right?  “Palaeontologists use a simple eyeball test to distinguish stone tools from gastroliths,” Dempsey said.  If there are only wear marks on the outer surface, it’s a gastrolith.  “But wear on both inner and outer surfaces indicates that it has been used for some sort of pounding or battering and can confidently be considered a tool.”  That’s the thinking, but Dempsey stared at photographs from a recent paper in Nature by 18 scientists claiming stones from Africa were tools,2 and noticed the stones only had wear on extended surfaces.  These were not tools.  According to him, they had been tumbling inside some crocodile stomach for awhile.  How could so many scientists be mistaken?Identification of the Oldowan specimens as tools is based on the fact that the soft relict sands of Olduvai Gorge contain no natural stones of their own, so any stone found there must have been moved from distant river beds by some unknown animal transporter – concluded by high science to be Homo habilis.  But crocodiles have the curious habit of swallowing rocks: these account for 1% of their body weight, so for a 1-tonne crocodile that’s 10 kg of stones in its stomach at all times.  Surprisingly, science has never even considered the crocodile as transporter.Homo habilis is nicknamed “Handy man” by evolutionary anthropologists because of assumed evidence he was a toolmaker.  Dempsey’s scenario for the tool evidence, however, pictures crocs on ancient riverbeds vomiting up their gastroliths with no handymen in sight.  “Hippo herds would naturally trample riverside gravel stones into the shape of Oldowan cutting tools, quantities of which the crocodile would then swallow and transport to other places.”  The stones were deposited at the river edge where the crocodiles lived and died.So far, all East African Oldowan specimens have come from the same waterside environments where crocodiles are known to have dwelt.  Millions, perhaps trillions, of transported crocodile stomach stones must remain where the old crocodiles left them, deep in relict East African sediments, though none has ever been reported.A quick Google search does not reveal any response to this letter yet.  A future issue of Nature will undoubtedly contain rebuttals – probably from the 18 anthropologists accused of misidentifying the Oldowan stones.  The point is that science needs to be open to alternative interpretations of mute historical evidence.  The fact that Nature published this letter and even dressed it up with a Sidney Harris cartoon of a croc ordering stones at a fast-food counter indicates that the editors felt Dempsey’s letter deserves a response.  We’ll have to wait and see if that comes after awhile, crocodile.1.  Patrick Dempsey, “Were crocodiles responsible for the stones we call tools?” Correspondence, Nature 461, 341 (17 September 2009) | doi:10.1038/461341a; Published online 16 September 2009.2.  Haslam et al, “Primate archaeology,” Nature 460, 339-344 (16 July 2009) | doi:10.1038/nature08188.3.    Recently, Dempsey also questioned interpretations of “stone tools” in the California desert by the late great Louis Leakey.  His publication by the SCA Society alleges they were products of lightning spalls at the same location that had been reported in a scientific paper 25 years earlier.  The fact that a famous scientist could be so mistaken is what led him to also question the stone tool interpretation at Olduvai Gorge.We’re not taking sides till the rebuttals are in, but wouldn’t it be funny if the paleoanthropologists in “high science” have been goofing for 80 years?  Actually, it’s not so funny if our children have been told falsehoods about Homo habilis for the last four generations.  The evolutionary storytellers are likely to be upset with this upstart “Great Basin avocationalist” throwing stones into their glass house.  They will need to preserve their reputations as much as the evolutionary Myth of Handy Man evolving into Man the Wise.    What can we learn from this story?  For one, stones do not interpret themselves.  It takes a fallible human to put them into an artificial explanatory framework.  Other fallible humans can look at the framework to see how well the evidence fits, but fallible humans make mistakes (by definition).  Second, scientists sometimes get on bandwagons.  They train each other and learn how to interpret the evidence according to the reigning paradigm.  The paradigm can become self-reinforcing.  Science needs observers outside the box who aren’t affected by bluffing and peer pressure.  Third, evolutionists have been caught again using design detection principles in spite of themselves, but this time, they may have reported a false positive.  Fourth, where indeed are the trillions of gastroliths that should be there if this site was inhabited by crocs and hippos for millions of years?    Finally, some paradigms can become so intransigent that contrary evidence may not dislodge them.  In the cartoon strip Peanuts, Lucy was showing Charlie Brown a butterfly on the sidewalk one day.  She explained that butterflies this large usually are found in Brazil.  Looking closer, Charlie Brown exclaimed, “That’s no butterfly, it’s a potato chip!” to which Lucy responded, “Well I’ll be, you’re right, Charlie Brown.  I wonder how a potato chip got all the way here from Brazil?”    If the paleoanthropologists come to agree with Dempsey that the Oldowan stones are indeed gastroliths, they will not likely apologize for 80 years of mythology about Homo habilis.  They will just merge the antithesis into a new synthesis.  They will claim that the Handy Men were so handy, they even kept crocodiles as pets and harvested their gastroliths to use as tools.  An alternative interpretation might be the classification of a new genus, Crocodylus habilis.  Irrefutable complicity; wouldn’t that be a handy crock.(Visited 109 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Cape Argus Cycle Tour at 35 000 entrants and counting

first_imgCyclists take in the beautiful views around the peninsula on their way back to Cape Town. (Image: Cape Argus Cycle Tour)• Cape Argus Pick n Pay Momentum Cycle Tour+27 21 686 0222media@cycletour.co.zaLucille DavieThere can’t be many races in the world that attract 35 000 riders each year, with bikers ranging in age from 13 years to 90-somethings. The Cape Argus Cycle Tour is held every year in Cape Town, when the city stops, pulls out its deck chairs, and watches the riders go flashing by.The 109km Cape Argus Pick n Pay Momentum Cycle Tour starts and ends in the city’s CBD, with riders taking in some spectacular backdrops of the Atlantic and Indian oceans.Billed as “the world’s largest timed cycle race”, the 37-year-old race traces its history back to 1977, when Bill Mylrea and John Stegmann organised the Big Ride-In to draw attention to the need for cycle paths in the city. It attracted hundreds of cyclists, who met on the Grand Parade and rode down Adderley Street to the foreshore. The following year the Argus Cycle Tour was born, attracting 525 entrants, with 14 cyclists finishing under three hours and 30 minutes. It started outside the Castle in Strand Street, took in the peninsula, and finished in Camps Bay, a distance of 104km.The 1979 race saw the record time drop to two hours, 52 minutes and 38 seconds, with the top woman coming in at three hours, 36 minutes and 46 seconds. By 1980 the race was attracting top riders, like Springbok cyclist Hennie Wentzel, who won in three hours, two minutes and 18 seconds.Jump to 1994 and the entries passed the 20 000 mark, with 400 international riders. In near-perfect weather conditions in 1995 the records tumbled: Swede Michael Andersson set a new record of two hours, 22 minutes and 56 seconds. That year saw the number of entries jump to over 25 000, 21% of whom were women.In 1997 the 20th tour attracted over 30 000 entrants, and by 2006 there were 500 entrants from the UK. The 30th tour attracted big Tour de France names – Jan Ullrich, Greg LeMond and Steven Rooks. By this stage international entries topped the 2 000 mark.In 2011, on a windless day, Walter Hein, 87, finished in five hours, seven minutes and one second, with 75-year-old Marie-Louise Swoboda coming in in five hours, 32 minutes and 33 seconds.In 2012 Tour de France legends – Stephen Roche, Miguel Indurain and Eddy Merckx – returned to do the race, and were joined by several politicians – the minister of sport and recreation, Fikile Mbalula, and the Western Cape premier Helen Zille. Japie Malan, 92, reclaimed his title as the oldest participant, finishing on a tandem with his son in five hours, 50 minutes and 40 seconds. And the oldest woman to finish, 76-year-old Maisie Swoboda, finished her 28th tour with a sprained ankle. Her record has subsequently been surpassed by 84-year-old Clare Graaff.In 2013 just over 3 000 international riders turned up in Cape Town for the race.Cape Argus LegendsThe race has its own legends too. Gareth Holmes, Neil Bramwell, Stephen Stefano, Steph du Toit, Louis de Wall, Alex Stewart, and Neville Yeo have completed all 37 Argus Cycle Races and are called the Magnificent Seven.Bramwell, the oldest at 77 years, says his best time was two hours and 50 minutes, completed in 1985 when he was in his mid-40s. He only started the race at the age of 40. He says that the seven don’t train together, but about two weeks before the race, they get together for a braai, and discuss the past year of training and riding.“We always start the race in the DD batch, at 7.40am,” he explains. But because the groups are made up of 1 000 riders each, they soon lose each other. His main challenge these days is to “keep out of trouble” during the ride. By that he means keep his distance from other riders, so that if an accident happens, he doesn’t crash into a tangle of riders on the tar. “I enjoy the ride very much. It is a magnificent circuit, with a lot of variety of views.” He says he has never had an accident and no mechanical problems except one puncture in 37 years.His time in 2014 was six hours and three minutes. “I was disappointed at how slow I was.” But this won’t deter him – he doesn’t see himself giving up the race. “I will keep going as long as my health allows me.”The Cape Argus Cycle Tour is one of a number of endurance races that South Africans are famous for. Others are the Comrades Marathon, the Dusi Canoe Marathon, the Freedom Challenge, the Midmar Mile, the Berg River Race, and the Cape Epic mountain bike race.last_img read more

The Real Reason AT&T And Verizon Are Pushing New “Shared” Data Plans

first_imgA new iPhone this year may mean a new “shared data” wireless plan for you, too. They may or may not save you money – that’s not the point. They’re really designed to put the wireless carriers in a better financial position for the future.Get Ready To ShareWith Apple’s new iPhone expected to launch in mid-September, expect to hear a lot of noise about newish, “shared” service plans from Verizon Wireless and AT&T, the biggest U.S. wireless carriers. The big idea: Instead of having separate pools of data allowances between different devices – an iPhone and iPad, for example – all of your family’s devices draw from the same pool.Verizon already requires these plans for new subscribers, and AT&T says it will require them for subscribers who want to use Apple’s FaceTime video chat service over the mobile internet. (Translation: Eventually, you’ll end up using one whether you want to or not.)Here’s how it works: For each device, you pay a monthly “access” fee. At Verizon Wireless, for example, this ranges from $40 per month for smartphones to $10 per month for tablets. This provides unlimited talking and texting on phones – no more minutes to keep track of. Then, you choose a monthly bucket of data that all your devices use, ranging from $50 per month for 1 GB to $100 per month for 10 GB.The pitch to the consumer is that these plans are smarter for today’s families, which often have multiple smartphones and tablets. If you’re not using all the iPhone data you’re paying for, why not be allowed to use it on your iPad?The Business MotivePerhaps this pricing realignment makes some sense for subscribers. But it really makes sense for the carriers.Consider how much more time you spend using a smartphone’s data signal versus making voice calls. Since I started using an iPhone in 2008, my data usage far has far outpaced my voice usage. Last month, I used 70 voice minutes, but probably spent over 50 hours using data. (Meanwhile, I’ve accumulated 3,900 “rollover” minutes on AT&T – a near-worthless benefit that made much more sense a decade ago.)But while our smartphone data usage could now be 10 to 20 times our voice usage (if not more!), the amount of money we spend on voice is still usually half or more of our monthly bills. Below, I’ve charted the last 10 years’ worth of Verizon’s voice and data service revenues. Overall service revenue has more than tripled, but data is still only about 44% of Verizon Wireless’s service revenue. Related Posts dan frommer Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Tags:#mobile#web Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … With faster wireless networks – the new iPhone is expected to work on Verizon’s 4G LTE network – and services like Skype and Apple’s FaceTime and iMessage, which “disrupt” the carrier voice and messaging services, it becomes even more important for carriers to shift billing toward data plans.With more connected devices launching all the time, these new “shared” plans offer greater convenience to subscribers – at a potentially higher cost. But what they really do is insulate carriers from potential disruption to outdated service models, and provide a more stable, logical revenue model for current and future wireless usage.Phone and tablet photo via Shutterstock.last_img read more

Vince Carter biopic to be shown at Toronto film fest

first_imgK-pop star Jung Joon-young convicted of gang rape, spycam crimes View comments Vince Carter’s illustrious career will head to the big screen and it’s only fitting it will be first shown where it all began.A documentary titled ”The Carter Effect” will be featured at the Toronto International Film Festival, which will be held on Sept. 7-17.ADVERTISEMENT Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Hot-shooting San Beda humbles Mapua for 6th win Dubbed as “Vinnsanity” and “Air Canada” for his off-the-charts, high-flying antics, the current Sacramento Kings guard played a monumental role in putting the once obscure expansion franchise on the basketball map and into a legitimate playoff contender in the Eastern Conference in the early 2000s.The dynamic eight-time All-Star also become one of, if not the best dunker of all time—punctuated by his now iconic performance at the 2000 NBA Slam Dunk contest.The film will also go through Carter’s ugly split with the team, after he left for the New Jersey Nets in 2004.Now 41 years old, Carter may no longer possess the same youthful athleticism he once had, but he continues to be an effective player in the league.He also helped raise the popularity of the sport  in the hockey-dominated country and helped foster a generation of today’s brightest Canadian stars including Andrew Wiggins, Tristan Thompson, Kelly Olynyk, Cory Joseph and Jamal Murray.  Khristian Ibarrola /raADVERTISEMENT Huge Toronto crowd celebrates Raptors’ historic win PLAY LIST 01:08Huge Toronto crowd celebrates Raptors’ historic win03:12Kevin Durant out with Achilles injury; to undergo MRI on Tuesday01:43Who are Filipinos rooting for in the NBA Finals?01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspensioncenter_img Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Read Next LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC MOST READ As confirmed by the Toronto Star, the biopic, directed by Sean Menard, will delve into Carter’s undeniable impact in Canada during his six years  as a member of the Toronto Raptors basketball team from 1998 to 2004..@seanmenard’s documentary THE CARTER EFFECT, an unprecedented look at @Raptors @NBA All-Star Vince Carter (@mrvincecarter15). #TIFF17 pic.twitter.com/ElC2XBTum2FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout— TIFF (@TIFF_NET) August 9, 2017last_img read more

Morning newswrap December 6

first_imgIt’s over. No more Cyclone Ockhi. But don’t put your umbrellas away just yet, GujaratPeople in Gujarat, Maharashtra, and Madhya Pradesh, you can still expect light to moderate rain, depending on where you are. Read on to learn more.’Islamist’ terror plot to assassinate UK PM Theresa May foiled The men were taken into custody last week, but news of the arrests came when an official report was released, a UK newspaper reported.Shashi Kapoor and Jennifer Kendal’s children: Meet Karan, Kunal and SanjanaShashi Kapoor passed away on December 4 in Kokilaben Hospital, Mumbai at the age of 79.Delhi to not get international game till 2020, BCCI’s rotation policy comes into playDelhi’s viability as an international sports venue has been called into question after Sri Lankan players complained of breathing problems due to smog in the ongoing third Test against India at Feroz Shah Kotla.last_img read more

10 months agoKeane slams Man Utd after Liverpool thumping: These players not good enough

first_imgKeane slams Man Utd after Liverpool thumping: These players not good enoughby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United legend Roy Keane slammed the standard of the players after defeat at Liverpool.Mourinho’s team looked lost throughout the encounter and speaking after the game United legend Keane questioned the quality within his former team.“I certainly believe a lot of the players playing for Man United today aren’t good enough for Man United,” Keane told Sky Sports. “I really believe that. They are good players, but not for Man United.”Again you look over the last year or two, the league campaign, to be so far behind the likes of Liverpool, Man City, Tottenham and Chelsea at this moment of time.”We’re on about creativity, but I really think their biggest problem is defensively. You have to try and get some kind of foundation to go forward and were on about scoring a goal, you’ve got to try keep some clean sheets. They are all over the place.“I think if Liverpool were really at it today, towards the last 10 and 15 minutes, they could have scored four or five.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Senator Drilling plan carveout for Florida may be illegal

first_imgWASHINGTON – The Trump administration may have violated federal law by exempting Florida from a national plan to expand offshore drilling, a Democratic senator charged Thursday.Sen. Maria Cantwell of Washington state said Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s decision to give Florida a last-minute exemption while ignoring at least 10 other states that made similar requests may violate requirements of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, which governs drilling in U.S. coastal waters.Zinke’s action is especially outrageous because Florida — unlike California, Washington and other states — did not expressly oppose the drilling proposal in written comments submitted to the Interior Department, Cantwell said.While Florida Gov. Rick Scott voiced opposition soon after the plan’s Jan. 4 release, a letter submitted by the state Department of Environmental Protection last year did not oppose the drilling plan or ask for Florida to be exempted. Instead, the letter warned about the effects of oil and gas activities on the environment and urged that “long-term protection of Florida’s sensitive coastal and marine resources should be of paramount concern” in developing a drilling plan.By contrast, the governors of California, Oregon and Washington told Interior they “strongly oppose any new leasing” off their coasts and asked to be removed from the plan.By exempting Florida but not other states, Zinke showed he is “more concerned with politics than proper process when it comes to making key decisions that affect our coastal communities,” said Cantwell, the top Democrat on the Senate Energy Committee.Carl Tobias, a law professor at the University of Richmond, called Zinke’s action troubling. Singling out one state for exemption “may well violate federal law” that requires formal notice and comment period before taking regulatory action, he said.An Interior spokeswoman declined to comment Thursday. But White House press secretary Sarah Sanders denied the administration gave special treatment to Scott, a Republican and ally of President Donald Trump who is considered a likely Senate candidate later this year.“I’m not aware of any political favour that that (Florida exemption) would have been part of, so, no,” Sanders said.In announcing the exemption for Florida on Tuesday, Zinke called Scott “a straightforward leader that can be trusted.”Zinke added that he supports Scott’s position that “Florida is unique and its coasts are heavily reliant on tourism as an economic driver. As a result of discussion with Governor Scott and his leadership, I am removing Florida from consideration for any new oil and gas platforms.”Rep. Ted Lieu, D-Calif., said Zinke’s action “violates the legal standard of arbitrary and capricious agency action.”Like Florida, California and other coastal states “rely on our beautiful coasts for tourism and our economy,” Lieu said, adding that he believes courts will strike down the drilling plan.The American Petroleum Institute, the top oil and gas lobbying group, also questioned Zinke’s action — but from the other direction. The group called the Florida withdrawal “premature” and said restricting access to the Eastern Gulf of Mexico in particular “puts hundreds of thousands of jobs at risk across the country and along the Gulf Coast.”API spokesman Reid Porter said the Trump administration “should follow the established process” for developing an offshore drilling program, including public comment. “It is important that Interior complies with all the legal procedures and requirements for putting together” a drilling program on the Outer Continental Shelf, Porter said.Questions about the legality of the Zinke’s decision came as bipartisan opposition to the drilling plan mounted. Several governors, including leaders of Washington state, Delaware, Rhode Island and Maryland, asked for their states to be withdrawn from the plan and requested meetings with Zinke.A spokeswoman for Zinke said he spoke with South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster on Thursday and expects to speak Friday with North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper and California Gov. Jerry Brown.Democrats from coastal states accuse Zinke and Trump of punishing states with Democratic leaders while rewarding Republicans.Zinke announced plans last week to greatly expand offshore oil drilling from the Atlantic to the Arctic and Pacific oceans, including more than a dozen states where drilling is now blocked. The five-year plan would open 90 per cent of the nation’s offshore reserves to development by private companies.Industry groups praised the announcement, while environmental groups denounced the plan, saying it would harm America’s oceans, coastal economies, public health and marine life.last_img read more

Ohio State womens volleyball sees 20 lead evaporate in loss to No

Members of the OSU women’s volleyball team during a game against Michigan on Nov. 14 at St. John Arena. OSU lost 3-0. Credit: Giustino Bovenzi | Lantern PhotographerAfter taking the first two sets from fourth-ranked Minnesota on Wednesday night, the Ohio State women’s volleyball team had the Big Ten leaders on the ropes.But the No. 16 Buckeyes (22-9, 11-8) couldn’t deliver the knockout blow, dropping three consecutive sets to fall to Minnesota (25-4, 17-2) for the second times in as many matches this season (27-25, 31-29, 17-25, 15-25, 9-15).The loss marked OSU’s second straight and its seventh over its last 11 matches.Meanwhile, the win for the Golden Gophers guaranteed them at least a share of the Big Ten title.Minnesota junior middle blocker Hannah Tapp put forth a dominant performance with 20 kills on a .500 hitting percentage and added seven blocks to lead all players with 24 points.Also breaking the 20-point mark were junior outside hitter Sarah Wilhite (20 kills, three blocks, two aces) and senior outside hitter Daly Santana (17 kills, three aces, three blocks).With hard-fought, extra-point wins in the first two sets, OSU looked poised to pull off the upset in Minneapolis, but unforced errors proved to be the difference down the stretch as it blew the two-game advantage.The Buckeyes committed only one hitting error and attacked .348 in the first frame, though it took all they had to fight off the Golden Gophers. Faced with set point on three different occasions, OSU was able to force extra points and flipped a 25-24 deficit into a 27-25 win.The Scarlet and Gray didn’t find as much success on offense in the second set, but held Minnesota in check (.068 attack percentage) behind five blocks. The teams battled even further into extra points than they did in the first set, but the OSU was again able to find its way to a win.An upset looked even more certain for the Buckeyes when they jumped out to a 3-0 lead in the third set, but things unraveled from there as they would lead only once more — for a brief time in the fifth set — in the remainder of the match.OSU was significantly out-hit, .375-.140, over the final three frames as it committed 19 attack errors (versus only six for Minnesota) and had nine shots blocked.Three Buckeyes notched double-doubles in the loss: senior outside hitters Elizabeth Campbell (18 kills, 15 digs) and Katie Mitchell (11 kills, career-high 14 digs), along with freshman setter Taylor Hughes (career-high 54 assists, 15 digs).Reigning Big Ten freshman of the week and outside hitter Audra Appold led OSU with 19 points by way of 18 kills and one solo block.As it tries to get some degree of momentum heading into the NCAA tournament, OSU is scheduled to wrap up the regular season on Saturday in St. John Arena on senior night against Rutgers. In the teams’ previous matchup in Piscataway, New Jersey, the Buckeyes handled the Scarlet Knights rather easily in three sets. First serve is scheduled for 7 p.m. read more

Penalty kicks spark doom Ohio State mens soccer

Senior defender Kyle Culbertson (3) attempts a penalty kick during a game against Indiana on Oct. 12 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU lost, 2-1, as Culbertson made one penalty kick, but missed another in the game’s closing minutes.Credit: Ed Momot / For The LanternFacing a top-10 opponent, the Ohio State men’s soccer team’s goalscoring on Sunday afternoon lived by a penalty kick — and ultimately died with a penalty kick.The Buckeyes (4-5-3, 2-2-0) played a tight game throughout the 90 minutes against the No. 10 Indiana Hoosiers (8-1-3, 2-1-1), but were ultimately unable to match the play of their opponent, falling at home, 2-1.A penalty kick by junior defender Kyle Culbertson — his second try of the day following a successful one — was knocked away with just over a minute remaining to seal the Indiana victory.“I’m heartbroken for the guys right now, because although there were stretches of the game where we made some bad mistakes and hurt ourselves, we played well enough to win the game and I think deserved to win the game,” OSU coach John Bluem said.The Hoosiers broke a 1-1 tie in the 78th minute with a goal by freshman forward/midfielder Jay McIntosh. Heavy pressure in front of the net allowed McIntosh to take a pass and knock it into the far-right post, where it ricocheted into the net.McIntosh’s goal — the first of his collegiate career — came less than 50 seconds after the Buckeyes had tied the game.An Indiana defender attempted to clear out the ball in front of his goalkeeper, but did so with his hand, granting the Buckeyes a penalty kick. The kick was taken by Culbertson, who rolled a shot to the left side of the net while Indiana sophomore goalkeeper Colin Webb dove to the right.The goal was Culbertson’s second of the season, and seemed to turn around the momentum of the game until McIntosh’s strike seconds later.“Their quality combined with the amount of effort we put in during the first 25 or 30 minutes, maybe we got a little bit tired,” junior midfielder Zach Mason said. “But I think it’s just something where we had moments, and they had moments, and unfortunately they took better advantage of their moments.”With just more than a minute remaining, it was déjà vu for the Buckeyes and Hoosiers, as another handball gave the Buckeyes another penalty kick — which was again taken by Culbertson.However, there was no such luck on Culbertson’s second try, as Webb again dove right, only this time directly to where Culbertson shot the ball. The sophomore knocked it away, sealing the win for the Hoosiers.“That’s very hard to make two penalty kicks in one game,” Bluem said. “But we felt confident that he could do it, so we went with him, and I wouldn’t change the decision. I felt it was the right decision then and unfortunately their goalkeeper came up with a big play.”Indiana opened the scoring early in the second half, when heavy traffic in front of the net allowed the ball to bounce out to junior forward Femi Hollinger-Janzen, who deposited the shot into the empty net.“We defended poorly, on both goals against us today,” Bluem said. “That’s all I’ll say about that, we just defended poorly.”The Buckeyes controlled the ball throughout the majority of the first half. However, their aggressiveness did not lead to any scoring, as three goal-scoring opportunities — two shots by sophomore forward Danny Jensen wide of the net and a rocket off the foot of senior midfielder Max Moller knocked away by a diving Webb — all went for naught.“I think that we had the opportunity to score, myself included, and we didn’t put them away” Jensen said. “At the end of the day, you have to put those chances away to win the game against a top-10 team in the nation.”OSU is set to have five days off before traveling to Madison, Wisc., to take on the Wisconsin Badgers on Saturday. That match is scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. read more