Hulu teams up with Chrissy Teigen for 6month discount

first_img 2 TV and Movies Online Comments 3:15 2019 TV shows you can’t miss Top 5 streaming services for live TV 50 Photoscenter_img Tags Hulu Share your voice Now playing: Watch this: Hulu ad-supported subscriptions are half off for six months. SOPA Images Chrissy Teigen is apparently celebrating her upcoming cooking show on Hulu with a deal for new and some returning subscribers.  The celebrity posted the deal via her Instagram account on Tuesday. Hulu is offering its ad-supported subscription for $2.99 per month for six months, a 50% discount from its normal price. After six months, subscriber bills will rise to $5.99 a month. Current Hulu subscribers aren’t eligible for the discount.”I can’t wait for you guys to see what I’m working on with @hulu. You guys will love it…especially the part where I convinced them to give you all Hulu for half off for 6 months,” Teigen wrote. The accompanying picture appears to be a sponsorship contract with Hulu. Teigen has a new show coming to Hulu called Family Style, and has signed on to a two-year production deal for several new Hulu cooking shows. Hulu’s ad-free subscription costs $11.99 per month, and its Hulu + Live TV package costs $44.99 per month. The streaming service said in May it has 26.8 million paying subscribers, netting 8 million in the past year and outpacing the growth of its larger streaming competitor Netflix in 2018. last_img read more

How dogs can walk on ice without freezing their paws

first_img Explore further Scientists in Japan have solved a long-standing veterinary mystery: how dogs can stand and walk for so long on snow and ice without apparent discomfort, and without freezing their paws. Scientists at Tokyo’s Yamazaki Gakuen University wondered why dogs do not seem to feel the cold in their paws, even though the paws have less insulating fur than their trunks. The paws have pads containing a high fat content, which freezes less easily than other tissues, but they also have a high surface area-to-volume ratio, which means they should lose heat easily.In humans exposed to frigid temperatures, vasoconstriction occurs in the extremities to reduce the blood flow and resultant heat loss, and ensure the blood returning to the rest of the body does not cool too much. The research team, led by Dr. Hiroyoshi Ninomiya, used a scanning electron microscope to study the paws of four adult dogs, and discovered that the arteries supplying blood to the pads had networks of numerous small veins, or venules, closely associated with them, and that the system essentially acts as a counter-current heat exchanger. When warm blood arrives in the paws via the arteries, heat is transferred to the venules closely associated with the arteries, thus ensuring the blood has been warmed up before it returns to the rest of the body.The counter-current heat exchange system prevents the body cooling and ensures the paw temperature stays within reasonable limits. The same system has also been identified in other animals such as Antarctic penguins, where it occurs in their legs and wings, and dolphins, which use a heat exchange system in their fins. The Arctic Fox (Vulpes lagopus) was already known to have a counter-current heat exchange system in its paws, along with numerous other adaptations to the cold, but the existence of such a system in domestic dogs had not been previously suspected or identified. The findings suggest that domestic dogs might have originated in a cold climate, in which such a system would have had survival benefits.Domesticated dogs are not all able to withstand icy conditions on their paws to the same extent, depending on their environment (such as habitually living indoors), and the breed. Common tips often suggested to help domestic dogs avoid cold feet in winter is to ensure their pads are not split or injured in any way, and to spray their paws with cooking spray before taking them out in the snow. Frostbite is very rare in dogs, but it can occur.The paper is published in the journal Veterinary Dermatology. More information: Veterinary Dermatology, Volume 22, Issue 6, pages 475–481, December 2011. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-3164.2011.00976.x © 2011 PhysOrg.comcenter_img Citation: How dogs can walk on ice without freezing their paws (2012, January 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-01-dogs-ice-paws.html Through sunshine, bitter cold, dogs need exercise This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Married LGBT adults healthier happier Study

first_imgFor years, studies have linked marriage with happiness among heterosexual couples. A new study now shows that the benefits of marriage extend to lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) couples as well.In the study, published in the journal The Gerontologist, LGBT participants who were married reported better physical and mental health, more social support and greater financial resources than those who were single. For the research, Jayn Goldsen from the University of Washington, and her colleagues used survey data from more than 1,800 LGBT people, aged 50 and older, in locations where gay marriage was already legal in the US in 2014. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfAbout one-fourth were married, another fourth were in a committed relationship and half were single. Married respondents had spent an average of 23 years together, while those in a committed, unmarried relationship had spent an average of 16 years.Among the study participants, more women were married than men.Researchers found that, in general, participants in a relationship, whether married or in a long-term partnership, showed better health outcomes than those who were single. But those who were married fared even better, both socially and financially, than couples in unmarried, long-term partnerships.Single LGBT adults were more likely to have a disability; to report lower physical, psychological, social and environmental quality of life; and to have experienced the death of a partner, especially among men, the findings showed.last_img read more