Boeing details fixes to get 737 Max flying again

first_img Comment Now playing: Watch this: Tags 32 Photos Boeing said the fixes will “reduce the crew’s workload in non-normal flight situations and prevent erroneous data from causing MCAS activation.” Among them:MCAS will now compare inputs from two sensors, instead of just one. (The system is activated by angle-of-attack sensors near the airplane’s nose.)If the sensors disagree by 5.5 degrees or more, MCAS will not automatically activate. According to a preliminary report from the first crash in October, a faulty AOA sensor was sending incorrect information to MCAS.An indicator on the flight deck display will alert the pilots when the sensors disagree. Until now, Boeing sold a warning light alerting pilots to a fault as part of an optional package of equipment. The aircraft involved in the first crash did not have that light installed.MCAS will kick in only one time if it determines an aircraft’s nose is too high. Also, MCAS will never move the horizontal stabilizer (the flight surface on the tailplane that moves an aircraft up and down) with more force than the pilot can exert on the control column. Both crash investigations show the planes oscillated several times before crashing, indicating that the system activated several times even after pilots recovered from the dives.Flight crews will need 21 or more days of instructor-led and simulator training on the 737 Max, including interacting with MCAS, before they can fly the aircraft. Boeing and the FAA are facing charges that current 737 Max pilot training did not mention the system in order to minimize the cost and time of certifying pilots. That training is now the focus of multiple investigations including one by Congress, which opened a hearing Wednesday.Boeing didn’t give a timeline for the changes or say when the 737 Max, which remains grounded around the world, might carry passengers again. Before that can happen, the FAA and aviation safety agencies in other countries will need to certify the fixes as safe. Airlines will then need to install them and retrain crews. A 747 story: The history of the jumbo jet 1 Share your voicecenter_img Aviation Boeing “The 737 family is a safe airplane family. And the 737 Max builds on that tremendous history of safety that we’ve seen for the last 50 years,” he said. “We’re working with customers and regulators around the world to restore faith in our industry and also to reaffirm our commitment to safety.”Though the official causes of both accidents have not been determined, investigators have found clear similarities. Under scrutiny is a flight control system called MCAS (for Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System) that pushes the 737 Max’s nose down when it determines that it’s too high. Preliminary data from both crashes show that flight crews struggled to take control as the airplanes continually dove just after takeoff.  Eager to assure airlines and passengers that its best-selling airplane is safe, Boeing on Wednesday announced how it will update a flight control system that’s at the center of investigations into crashes in Ethiopia and Indonesia that killed 346 people.Speaking at the company’s 737 factory in Renton, Washington, Boeing executive Mike Sinnett opened the briefing by expressing sympathy for the victims of both crashes and for their families.  2:33 Tech Industry How United Airlines prepares a Boeing 777 between flightslast_img read more

Googles ad system under EU probe for how it spreads your private

first_img 0 Post a comment Google’s ad practices are under scrutiny in the European Union. James Martin/CNET Ireland’s data protection watchdog has launched an investigation into Google’s collection of personal data for the purpose of online advertising.”A statutory inquiry pursuant to section 110 of the Data Protection Act 2018 has been commenced in respect of Google Ireland Limited’s processing of personal data in the context of its online Ad Exchange,” the Data Protection Commission said in a statement Wednesday.Google didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.The DPC, one of the lead authorities over Google in the European Union, wants to know whether the search giant’s “processing of personal data carried out at each stage of an advertising transaction” is in compliance with the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation. The GDPR is a sweeping law that gives residents of the European Union more control over their personal data and seeks to clarify rules for online services.The DPC inquiry follows a complaint filed in Europe in September by privacy-focused browser maker Brave that says Google violates GDPR by broadcasting personal information to companies bidding to show targeted ads. At the time, Google denied any wrongdoing.On Wednesday, Johnny Ryan, Brave’s chief policy and industry relations officer, said the DPC inquiry signals a change is coming that goes beyond just Google. “We need to reform online advertising to protect privacy, and to protect advertisers and publishers from legal risk under the GDPR,” Ryan said in a blog post.The EU probe comes as consumers, lawmakers and regulators take a harder look at how tech companies collect and use their personal information. Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal last year brought data collection issues to the forefront. Google has also been criticized for its wide-scale data operation and the way its location history settings could mislead consumers with its disclosures. In response, Google and Facebook have both begun to preach the virtues of privacy. Earlier this month, Google CEO Sundar Pichai wrote in a New York Times op-ed that privacy “should not be a luxury good.” He continued, “We’re also working hard to challenge the assumption that products need more data to be more helpful.”Google also pushed a privacy message at its Marketing Live summit last week in San Francisco, where the search giant addressed more than 5,000 advertisers and partners in its ad network. Prabhakar Raghavan, Google’s senior vice president of advertising and commerce, said that even though the company collects lots of user information to improve its products, Google should use “as little of that data as possible over time” for ad targeting.”Whoever’s leading the market [in five years] will be the ones who are actually the most trusted,” Raghavan told CNET. “If we can maintain that trust, then we can remain a market leader. If we don’t, it’s a question.”Originally published May 22, 11:27 a.m. PT.Update, 11:44 a.m. PT and 12:32 p.m PT: Adds more background. Tags Security GDPR Privacy Google Share your voicelast_img read more

So what are you doing this Republic Day

first_imgTo mark the 63rd Republic Day, let’s shift our priorities by trying to be responsible citizens. But R-Day in Delhi also means closed markets, traffic restrictions and more. So what do you do if you want to go out? Simple, head to the mall. Two city malls are organising cultural programmes in asscoation with Self Assessment and Management Workshop (SAM), an NGO. ‘Our volunteers will be performing dances, drama and will also be singing,’ says Geetanjali Atri, media coordinator, SAM. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’There will be  a dance performance by Prince Dance Group of India’s Got Talent fame who are coming from Chattisgarh. There will be dances based on Lord Shiva, Vishnu and Indian Army. A rock band, Eternal Bliss, will present a fusion mix of their own compositions dedicated to the Indian Army. They will round up with a skit based on Subhas Chandra Bose’s journey and sacrifice which inspired the whole nation.DETAILAt: Select Citywalk, Saket; Pacific Mall, Rajouri Garden When: Today Timings: 4 pm onwardslast_img read more