Kings at the corner shop

first_imgInside an apartment on Charles Street, prices hover around Euro 16,500,000Royal wedding fever may have abated somewhat but after the amazing spectacular event stage managed by the British Tourist Authority (surely?), the sudden revamped love for the Royal family by the often distinctly ambivalent British public shows no sign of,Inside an apartment on Charles Street, prices hover around Euro 16,500,000Royal wedding fever may have abated somewhat but after the amazing spectacular event stage managed by the British Tourist Authority (surely?), the sudden revamped love for the Royal family by the often distinctly ambivalent British public shows no sign of slowing down. Everyone wants a bit of the suddenly sexy world of the younger generation of toffs that have clotted our screens and newspapers of late. A driveway and apartment block on Charles StreetShould you want to live with the Royals you would, of course, have to work for them as an equerry or an under butler or something. If the idea of indentured labour appears a bit medieval to you, it is possible to live very near them, in what the estate agents will no doubt soon be calling ‘the royal fringes’.Although Westminster and Chelsea could conceivably have claimed to be abutting on our dear Queen, corgis and, of course, shiny-happy royal superstars Kates and Wills, they are too full of politicians, Russians, and Arabs, to be a smug British establishment.The living room, dining room and hallway of an apartment on Mount Street in Mayfair costs around Euro 3,500,000Mayfair is, really, the only truly royal neighbourhood and not only because the Queen was born on Brutton Street and still owns the freehold of most of it (the rest is owned by the Duke of Westminster.) Unlike most areas of London that try to call themselves ‘exclusive’ with a lick of paint and bit of gentrification in the form of a gastropub, Mayfair has been the des res place to live since the 17th century.Named after the two-week long May Fair that was held in the now cool Shepard’s Market from 1686 to 1784 till the well-to-do residents banned it for lowering the tone, it remains London’s most exclusive area, even today. The bedroomIt boasts not only the worlds best shopping-be it for watches or the best in hand made British excellence: bespoke silver, crystal and leather at William and Son on Mount Street or fine art on Cork Street or fashion, fashion, fashion till you drop on Bond Street. But also the finest in dining at Scotts, Nobu or Banaras.Even though it retains a distinctly chummy- if super posh-villagy feel, the same cannot be said of the real estate on the market at the moment. The properties are luxurious and grand; some of which date from the 18th century, and are fully equipped with all the latest must- have millionaire specs.Bath areaThere is an exceptional house/apartment on George Street, which-with two grand reception rooms and seven bedrooms, bathrooms and a stunning conservatory leading to a roof terrace- can be yours for Euro 16 million.(Rs 117.71 crore) This is a place that says you have arrived in London and you intend to stay.If this is a little steep for you then you can snap up a beautiful apartment overlooking lovely and leafy Grosvenor Square. This comes with a unique and quite wonderful 26-foot long reception room with balconies that open onto one of London’s finest locations.A conservatory leading to a roof terrace is available for Euro 16 millionFor those who want a bit of quirk in their properties there is a spacious and light place on the corner of Mount Street: the achingly hip shopping and eating destination for those in the know. This is on the market for Euro 3.5 million (Rs 25.75crore) after an extensive refurbishment has brought it up to date with under floor heating, wooden floors and cat 5 cabling throughout. Fine architecture, excellent shopping and a vibrant atmosphere makes Mount Street a great place to visit, live or work inSo if you want to live somewhere that is owned by the Royals, where they hang out and the super rich establishment play, then Mayfair is the address to vie for.The writer is a film and travel journalist.advertisementlast_img read more

Umpire Harper accuses Dhoni of intimidating him

first_imgUmpire Daryl Harper, who was involved in a controversy in the recent first Test match between India and the West Indies in Kingston, Jamaica, on Thursday, accused India captain MS Dhoni of trying to intimidate him during the match.Retired Umpire Daryl HarperHarper said Dhoni should have been penalized for his comments on poor umpiring, adding that he was forced to break his silence following the International Cricket Council’s ( ICC) inaction.According to the now-retired umpire, Dhoni approached him after Praveen Kumar was warned for running on the pitch, and said “we’ve had problems with you before, Daryl,” which the umpire interpreted as an attempt to intimidate.”I decided what he meant was that I was one umpired not influenced by any personalities or teams or boards. He hadn’t been able to intimidate me, I think that was part of it,” Harper said.Harper also said that Dhoni should have been punished for his comments at the post-match conference, where the India skipper had said: “If the correct decisions were made, the game would have finished much earlier and I would have been in the hotel by now.””That was my opinion (that he should have been censured), those were inappropriate comments. I think that’s definitely inappropriate,” Harper said.Harper also hit back at his critics and the ICC for not supporting him. He said he withdrew with from the third Test in Dominica because he didn’t want all the focus to shift to him from the players and the contest.advertisement”It would have been all about my performance in my 96th Test. I’m not sure if any more scrutiny was actually possible,” he said. “I loved my role but I didn’t want to see the focus switch to me when it should centre on the players and the contest.”The ICC had reacted to Dhoni’s criticism of Harper by saying: “The reality of the situation is that Daryl’s statistics show his correct decision percentage in Tests involving India is 96 per cent, which is considerably higher than the international average for top-level umpires.” Harper said it would have been better if the ICC management had shown the same support before he stepped down from the third Test.”If this type of support had been forthcoming before the horse had bolted, I would have stayed and officiated in my 96th Test match,” he said. “If it happened on my watch, I’d take action. If it happens after my watch, after the game is over, I expected the ICC, the controlling body, to do some controlling.”The Australian, however, admits to making two mistakes against India in the Test, as per the ICC Incident Log, compiled by the ICC match referee Jeff Crowe and regional umpire’s performance manager Barry Dudleston.last_img read more

Strauss has retired with grace

first_imgCricketwallah by Ayaz MemonIn a year marked with retirements of major players- some spontaneous, some forced- Andrew Strauss’s has been the most enigmatic and perhaps also the most significant. More than anything else, it shows how vulnerable cricket captains are in the modern game.True, Strauss lost the Test series and England the world number 1 ranking to South Africa. In an age when success is demanded at every step, and past records gather cobwebs once day turns into night, this setback was always going to hurt Strauss.It must be remembered that England had also lost a Test series 0-3 to Pakistan in the Middle East a few months back, so their fall from the top position had been as dramatic as India’s, though this may not have been reflected in the rankings. The fact that the current defeats came at home, where most England fans believed their team was invincible, would have been doubly troubling for Strauss: this, as also his own personal form which has waned more often than waxed since the Ashes victory last year.Yet, Strauss seemed to be under no immediate threat to relinquish his position.The selectors were still unwavering in their support, and the establishment had been solidly behind him in the controversy involving star batsman Kevin Pietersen.What makes a captain take such a drastic call is something that still daunts cricket academics. Retirement for a sportsperson- with its accompanying insecurities and loss of identity- is always a vexing issue.For a cricket captain it is even more excruciating because it also means- apart from all else, tremendous loss of power. No other sport vests so much authority in a captain.advertisementSome captains are gross misfits, some let others call the shots, some blunder along till they are replaced. There are only a few who- once they accept the job- make it their purpose in life.Strauss was clearly from the last category which makes his retirement both perplexing and admirable. But unless there is some diabolical reason for Strauss to quit which could be overturned, this seems highly improbable. As things stand, one can only say, “Well played sir!”last_img read more

Drug money funds terror acts in India

first_imgA nexus among Pakistan’s Inter Services Intelligence (ISI), Maoists and insurgent groups of North-East is using money earned from drug trafficking to fund terror activities in India, official sources have said.Major drug seizures on the India- Nepal border in the past four months have put a spotlight on this revenue generation strategy adopted by terror groups. Intelligence sources say that the ISI, Maoists and north- eastern groups are hand in glove.In the last four months, Custom officials have seized more than 10 kg of heroin worth Rs 60 crore in international market from the India- Nepal border in Bihar’s Araria district. Apart from this, 1,000 kg of marijuana and four kg of charas were also seized in the same area.”The amount of seizure made in the last four months from the Indo- Nepal border drastically exceeds the seizure made in years from across the country. In the past, not more than three- four kg of heroin was recovered during the entire year,” said a Custom official, who is a part of the team probing the seizures.While only two arrests have been made in the five cases, counter- terror agencies suspect that the terror nexus is behind this international drug racket.”This is definitely the most lucrative method of generating funds…The Maoists have managed to procure hi- tech weapons from the US and China. Where is the money coming from?” an intelligence official said . The information about the big seizures has been shared by other agencies. The Directorate of Revenue Intelligence ( DRI) and the Intelligence Bureau have also been roped in. A detailed dossier, with all information on the drug syndicate and its links with terror outfits, is also being prepared.The DRI has already prepared a detailed note on the ongoing probe and forwarded it to intelligence agencies.Even the National Investigation Agency ( NIA) – probing the arms procurement of the Maoists – is looking into the financial aspect.Sources say the entire machinery is well- organised.The procurement is being done by the ISI, while the stocking and distribution are done by the Maoists and N- E insurgents.Many smugglers are former Maoists who facilitate the drug trade. The drugs being procured are from two blocks – the golden triangle: Iran, Afghanistan and Iraq; and the golden crescent: Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia and Laos.What has shocked agencies is that unlike in the past, drugs are also being used in India. “Traditionally India was only a transit route, but now the demand for various drugs is increasing within the country,” said an official from the Narcotics Control Bureau.advertisementlast_img read more

How militants fighting Pakistan’s covert war with India are trained for battle, martyrdom

first_imgTARGET INDIA: A model of a Ghauri missile in Muzaffarabad, 182 km from SrinagarFour bearded militants warm themselves at a gas heater in an Islamabad safe house. A wireless set suddenly crackles. “Our boys have entered Srinagar Airport,” a grave, distant-sounding voice announces.The voice, speaking in Urdu and broadcasting from,TARGET INDIA: A model of a Ghauri missile in Muzaffarabad, 182 km from SrinagarFour bearded militants warm themselves at a gas heater in an Islamabad safe house. A wireless set suddenly crackles. “Our boys have entered Srinagar Airport,” a grave, distant-sounding voice announces.The voice, speaking in Urdu and broadcasting from deep within India’s part of Kashmir, is detailing the progress of a suicide mission by Lashkar-e-Toiba, a ruthless, Pakistan-based militant group waging war to wrest Kashmir from India. Other militant groups in Pakistan can tune in to the same radio frequency.So can the Pakistani military. A phone in the house rings, and one of the men, all members of Lashkar-e-Toiba, answers. He is asked what’s happening. His reply: “Why don’t you find out from your side?” After hanging up, he explains the caller was a Pakistani army colonel.That scene occurred in early January. Five Lashkar operatives disguised as police officers attempted to attack the Srinagar airport that day. But Indian Army guards turned them away, and the operation was aborted. However, a second attempt a few days later succeeded, leaving six Lashkar-e-Toiba men and four policemen dead. Two civilians were killed and 12 injured.Since Kashmir erupted in 1989, India has pointed a blunt and unwavering finger at Pakistan, accusing it of fomenting the entire problem.It’s a large and cynical exaggeration: anti-Indian sentiment runs high within Kashmir, and in the first half of the 1990s, Kashmiris themselves provided the steam in the anti-Indian militant movement.They were disorganised and willing to murder, but passionate and anxious to plead their nationalist cause with the outside world.Today, however, India’s charge rings a lot truer. Despite a decade of denials – Islamabad insists it provides only moral and political support, not training or tangible aid – Pakistan is fuelling militant activity in Kashmir.advertisementOf the five main militant groups operating in Kashmir, four are based in Pakistan, where open recruiting and fundraising are commonplace. Training of militants is also done on Pakistani soil. The Pakistani military is deeply involved, especially in the smuggling of anti-Indian militants across the Line of Control.Militant groups have roots all over Pakistan, from well-equipped training centres in Muzaffarabad – the capital of Pakistan’s slice of Kashmir-and the North West Frontier Province to Lahore and Islamabad. Here is an inside look at how Pakistan runs its covert war in Kashmir:Recruiting and trainingThere are thousands of young, motivated Pakistani men anxious to join the militancy in Kashmir, which they consider a holy war. They come from all walks of life: not merely from the religious schools known as madarsas, or the far-flung, poverty-mired towns and villages, but also from Pakistan’s educated and westernised middle and upper classes.And for these highly religious volunteers, many of whom are still in their teens, there is nothing more sacred in life than achieving the status of a martyr. These are the grunts in the war. The leaders are Pakistani veterans of the Afghan war.LONG MARCH : Foreign militants on an uphill walk in south Kashmir. The fittest volunteers from the training camps cross over into India from forward posts of the Pakistani ArmyThe largest training camp in Pakistan is run by the Lashkar-e-Toiba, a wing of an Afghan mujahideen group known as Markaz Al Dawa Wal Irshad. It is set on a vast mountain clearing overlooking Muzaffarabad. Armed men guard the facility round-the-clock. There are only two structures, one an armoury, the other a kitchen. Trainees live and sleep in the open. The field is dotted with installations used to teach the fervent young – some no older than 14 – how to cross a river, climb a mountain or ambush a military convoy.The day of a trainee begins at four in the morning. After offering prayers, the militants go for exercises. A breakfast of tea and bread is at eight, followed by a full day of rigorous drills, which are interrupted only for prayers and a simple lunch, usually rice and lentils.Coursework covers how to use sidearms, sniper rifles, grenades, rocket launchers and wireless radio sets, as well as the art of constructing bombs. The teachers are Lashkar veterans of action in Kashmir and Afghanistan. Sports, music and television are forbidden.Trainees are only allowed to read prescreened newspaper articles. Training is divided into two stages. The first three-week session gives religious education and basic knowledge of how to handle firearms.Once a volunteer has passed that course, which costs the organisation about $330 (about Rs 15, 500) per trainee, he is sent to a designated city or town, often near his birthplace, to work at the group’s offices and become more involved with the organisation.When a volunteer proves himself capable, motivated and loyal, he is enrolled in a special three-month commando boot camp, which costs the group $1,700 (roughly Rs 80, 000) per student. (The money is raised from overseas groups and the Pakistani public.)advertisementIn the final weeks, recruits use live ammunition, construct actual explosives and perfect ambush techniques. The final exam lasts three days. A group of trainees, sometimes as large as 100 individuals, hikes and climbs through high-altitude, wooded terrain for three days without food or sleep.They are not allowed to slow their pace except for a few naps. At the end the hungry and thirsty survivors are given a goat, a knife and a matchbox. That’s their reward, and they have to cook and eat it in warlike conditions.Going inOnly the fittest from each graduating group are given a chance at martyrdom across the border in Kashmir. The local commander makes his choice, and the fortunate few are despatched to safe houses along the Line of Control known as “launching pads”. At this point, the Pakistani Army plays a crucial role in helping to arrange the infiltration of the militants across the Line of Control.Militants officially deny Pakistani Army involvement, but those who fought in Kashmir tell Time that the wait at the launching pad is dictated by their leaders, who are in touch with the army. “Until an unmarked vehicle turns up at your safe house,” says a veteran of Al-Badr, the first Pakistan-based militant organisation to get members across the line, “you don’t know when your number will come.”When it does, this is what happens: “The vehicle, covered from all sides, will pick up two, three or four militants according to the plan and dump them at one of the forward posts of the Pakistani Army,” the Al-Badr veteran says. “People in civvies give us arms, ammunition, food and money [Indian currency].We are asked to check our weapons. After a day or two they give us the signal to go ahead.” The next step is the most hazardous: from the Pakistani Army post, the group embarks on a three-to-seven night journey into Indian-controlled Kashmir, travelling by night, hiding during the day.The group leader wears night-vision goggles. The rest follow blindly across the mountains. There are numerous obstacles: Indian mines, tracer flares, Indian border patrols anxious to shoot at them. “But whenever such a situation arises,” says a Lashkar militant, “the Pakistani guns come to our rescue to provide cover.”Militants making the return trip go through a reverse route, ending up at a Pakistani Army base. In the 1990s, the Pakistani militants hired local guides – ethnic Kashmiris – to help them get across the mountains and into India.”On a number of occasions,” says Zakiur Rehman Lakhvi, 42, the supreme commander of the Lashkar-e-Toiba militants, “they took the money and tipped off the Indians. So we trained our own manpower.”advertisementIn other words, the Pakistani militants don’t always trust the Kashmiris on whose behalf they are waging this war. The Pakistani militancy, which had its roots in the Afghan war, is now an institution unto itself.last_img read more

Petron, F2 Logistics meet again in PSL Finals

first_imgIs Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? Photo from PSLMANILA, Philippines—Fierce rivals Petron and F2 Logistics set up another finals showdown in the 2018 Philippine Superliga All-Filipino Conference Tuesday night at Muntinlupa Sports Center.The Blaze Spikers, who are the defending champions, booked another trip to the championship round after dominating the Cignal HD Spikers, 25-21, 25-20, 25-16, in the main game.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next The Cargo Movers, on the other hand, took a much tougher road to the finals after needing to survive the Generika-Ayala Lifesavers in five sets, 21-25, 25-15, 25-20, 19-25, 15-5.Bernadeth Pons showed the way for Petron with 12 of her 14 points coming off attacks while Rhea Dimaculangan dished out 22 excellent sets.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefF2 Logistics had to lean on Cha Cruz-Behag, Ara Galang and Aby Maraño to fend off Generika as the three combined for 48 points.Behag fired a team-high 17 points while Maraño and Galang tallied 16 and 15 points, respectively. Manny Pacquiao sits out Tuesday training LATEST STORIES Lacson: 2019 budget delay due to P75-B House ‘insertion’ Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion MOST READ LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

FIFA may as well lock Suarez into Guantanamo Bay: Maradona

first_imgGiorgio Chiellini complains after Suarez ran into his shoulder with his teeth Diego Maradona blasted FIFA’s ban on Uruguay striker Luis Suarez as “criminal” and said world soccer’s governing body might as well handcuff the striker and lock him up in Guantanamo prison. “Who did Suarez kill?” Maradona said during his soccer commentary programme broadcast on Venezuela’s Telesur and Argentine public television on Thursday night.”This is football, this is contact,” the Argentine legend said. “They may as well handcuff him and bring him to Guantanamo directly.”The controversial US prison in Cuba, opened during the Bush administration, is heavily criticized by human rights groups for indefinite imprisonment of many detainees without charge or trial.Temperamental 1986 World Cup winner Maradona, known for his flamboyant declarations, is echoing outrage in Uruguay, where many are fuming at a ban they deem exaggerated, hypocritical or outright biased.Many abroad, however, were horrified by brilliant but volatile Suarez’s biting of Italian defender Giorgio Chiellini on Tuesday.Suarez was given longest sanction imposed at a World Cup by soccer’s governing body on Thursday, suspended from all football-related activity for four months and banned for nine international matches.But Maradona, who like Suarez emerged from a poor background to rise to global fame, fervently defended “Luisito” throughout the programme, at the end even unveiling a T-shirt with “We’re with you Luisito” scrawled on the front.”If he made a mistake, fine, they should punish him, but they shouldn’t exaggerate, they shouldn’t be moralistic,” said Maradona, who is close to Cuba’s former president Fidel Castro.advertisementLeftist Uruguayan president Jose Mujica also phoned in to the programme, blasting what he saw as a move to sideline Uruguay from the tournament where many European heavyweights have bit the dust.”We kicked out Italy, we kicked out England, how much money was lost there?,” said Mujica, a 79 year-old former guerrilla. “We’re Uruguay, we’re very little. It was cheap (for them to do).”The European establishment could not understand Suarez’s tough street style, Mujica and Maradona opined.”Incredible players are often born here in the heart of poverty,” Mujica said. “They don’t understand him because they don’t want to and because they were born in another society with other resources.”last_img read more

Healthy minds in healthy bodies the Indian way

first_imgTeeth clenched in concentration, a prostrate young man whirls his ring of fireUnder a grey, thundery sky, the wooden pillar rooted firmly in the ground looked like the relic of a great monument. Seven young men and a boy of ten squatted in a quarter-circle nearby, eyeing the pillar eagerly.,Teeth clenched in concentration, a prostrate young man whirls his ring of fireUnder a grey, thundery sky, the wooden pillar rooted firmly in the ground looked like the relic of a great monument. Seven young men and a boy of ten squatted in a quarter-circle nearby, eyeing the pillar eagerly. A command rang out: “Chall (Go!)”. One young man leapt away from his companions, took two swift strides, flung his arms and legs out at the pillar and straddled it upside down, holding on with thighs and forearms.Skin squeaking on wood, muscles working furiously, the athlete wriggled up until he had reached the wooden knob at the top. A few seconds later, his right leg was braced against the polished wood and his left was hooked firmly round the knob. Then the body swung out: hands on hips, it froze at 90 degrees to the vertical for all of five-muscle-quivering seconds. Then the tendons and flesh slackened and he came down to earth. Applause.An aggressively confident malkharnb poseMens sana in corpore sano. Healthy minds in healthy bodies the Indian way – that is the credo of the young man and his 170 fellow students of the Shree Hanuman Vyayam Prasarak Mandal, who had come to the capital all the way from Amravati, Maharashtra to demonstrate on the lawns of the National Stadium how Indians used to keep fighting fit centuries ago.Slim, muscular bodies shinnied up and down poles, swayed and feinted in the heat of a duel with javelins and rent the air with shouts as a single lithe figure fought off with a stick and a small circular shield the challenge of a dozen men armed with similar sticks. In between, boys and girls pirouetted gracefully to the rhythms of lezim, an age-old ballet work-out from Maharashtra.advertisementInexpensive Exercise: Founded as a small gymnastic club in 1914 by Anant Krishna Vaidya and Ambadas Krishna Vaidya, the Mandal is devoted to modernizing and systematising the Indian system of exercises to bring about a renaissance of Indian physical culture.The dhanurasana with a little help from a length of caneToday, six decades later, the Mandal occupies a 50-acre campus with a multi-purpose sports pavilion, a large swimming pool, a number of boys and girls hostels, extensive grounds and staff quarters. Besides the Indian exercise programmes, the Mandal also provides for regular games like table tennis and judo, and runs certificate courses in physical education. But its aim has always been to propagate the doctrine of inexpensive physical culture.Nowhere is this more evident than in the young men and the wooden pillar. The exercise is called the malkhamb and provides for all-round development of the body. The athletes pit muscle against wood and gravity and the results are startling: one hour a day of disciplined contortion is all that it needs to build a physique that could rival Bruce Lee’s.Variations of the malkhamb include a free-swinging pole and a long length of flexible and extremely tough cane. The Mandal’s malkhamb specialists, about 25 in number, are adept at coiling the cane around themselves so that they can take up a number of yoga postures.Much to the chagrin of the audience – which included Information and Broadcasting Minister Vasant Sathe and Minister of State for Education Shiela Kaul – this series of heart-stopping events gave way to javelin, stick and sword duels.Just as the warriors of kingdoms now part of the dust of history must have trained centuries ago, two young men of the Mandal confronted each other with glittering javelins, circling warily and lunging suddenly until one of them waved both javelins triumphantly as the other watched dejectedly. The crowning act of this series was one man taking on a dozen with flailing stick and shield: his opponents could not lay a finger on him.Torches flickering in a mild breeze, the athlets form intricate patterns on the lawnAs the repertoire of 35 items unreeled to its end after two and a half hours, and the dusk deepened into night, out came the torches. Boys, girls, men and women drilled under the smoking flames of half a hundred torches, wheeling into and out of patterns.The piece-de-resistance of the fire play was a young man who took two wires with torches at their ends and whirled them around faster and faster and faster while a soft hissing filled the air. The hissing continued even as he sank smoothly to the grass, prostrate with his mesmeric wheel of fire, until the torches exhausted themselves in the warm night air.advertisement- Photo feature by Raghu Rai/Text by Jagannath Dubashilast_img read more

Apinan leads balanced attack in Makati’s 12th straight victory

first_imgJoseph Sedurifa played his best game for Makati, tallying 15 points and grabbing nine rebounds, while Ced Ablaza, John Rey Villanueva, Mark Isip and Rudy Lingganay also dished out solid numbers for coach Cholo Villanueva.The stellar performance against the Clutch still wasn’t enough to convince Villanueva of his team’s title credentials in the 26-team tournament.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption charges“We’re still a work in progress,” said Villanueva, whose team had 22 assists and held Navotas to 37-percent shooting. “We want to continue improving, but as far as where we stand against the league’s best teams, we are not there yet.”The win all but guarantees Makati of home court advantage in the first round of the North division playoffs. Makati Super Crunch rolled to a 12th straight victory at the expense of Navotas Clutch, 96-87, on Wednesday night, even as Quezon City Capitals boosted their playoff hopes in the MPBL Datu Cup at Navotas Sports Complex.Six players, led by former Jose Rizal U star Jeckster Apinan with 20 points, finished in twin digits as the Super Crunch put on a clinic on both ends of the floor to seize second spot in the North division with an 18-4 card.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants Go: Search for ‘perfect, honest man’ to lead PNP still on PLAY LIST 01:31Go: Search for ‘perfect, honest man’ to lead PNP still on03:122 dead in California school attack; gunman shoots self00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting LATEST STORIES ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Once indisputable, Real Madrid’s Marcelo a target of critics View comments Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town The Capitals beat the Basilan Steel, 74-68, in the first game.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextlast_img read more