Notre Dame community members discuss racial issues, love

first_imgMembers of the Notre Dame community gathered in the Joyce Center on Tuesday to celebrate and honor Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, hearing from a panel entitled “A Call to Love: Bridging the Racial Divide.” Speakers discussed racial issues both in the world  and at Notre Dame, reflecting on how love and hope can help mend divides among groups. The panel was moderated by Jennifer Mason McAward, director of the Klau Center for Civil and Human Rights and associate professor of law. The panelists were Rev. Hugh Page, vice president and associate provost of undergraduate affairs; Rev. Peter McCormick, C.S.C., director of Campus Ministry; Ernest Morrell, director of the Center for Literacy Education; Notre Dame senior Alyssa Ngo; professor of art Maria Tomasula; and third-year law student Cameasha Turner. McAward began the discussion by giving a general definition of racism and asked the panel what they believe racism to be and how they see its manifestation in society. “Bigotry involves individual, interpersonal acts of meanness, based on a recipient’s racial, ethnic or cultural identity,” McAward said. “Racism refers to the systematic distribution of resources, power and opportunity in our society to the benefit of people who are white and the exclusion of people of color.”Ngo drew the distinction between individualized racism and systemic racism, stating that people should realize that the type of racism that most permeates society is systemic. “In terms of a systemic, institutionalized matter of discrimination, that’s what we’re talking about when we’re talking about racism … and I think it’s important that we get that definition on the table,” she said.Morrell agreed with Ngo but countered that individual racism is what perpetuates the cycle of hate throughout the years.“It’s the thoughts that individuals have that undergird the system … Our thoughts about others, our perceptions about others, that undergirds the system. While I would agree that racism is systemic, it is only sustainable because of individuals’ thoughts and actions in our society,” Morrell said. The panel then moved on to discussing the Inclusive Campus Climate Survey, focusing on the fact that 47 percent of students did not agree that Notre Dame demonstrated an authentic commitment to diversity. “There is no shortage of work to do in every aspect of life that we have here,” Page said.“When we think about this mission and tradition, it comes back to who’s making these decisions,” McCormick said. “If we believe our mission to be robust enough that it can enlighten hearts and minds and that other people from varying perspectives can come and take it and amplify it, in my estimation, we should strive in every way to allow that to be accomplished.”In addition, Turner discussed the disparity between the values taught in the Christian tradition and the action taken by churchgoers. “I challenge, not only the students, the faculty to re-examine what it means to be a Christian and not just attend Mass, not just attend church and be okay in that moment, but to actually leave church, to leave these panel discussions and implement what we talked about, what the pastor preached and what the priest told us,” Turner said. The conversation then turned to King’s provocative quote, “I have decided to stick with love. Hate is too great a burden to bear,” and discussing how love affects the movement to end racism. “If you take the lead of Dr. King and embrace the idea of a commitment to love and a commitment to justice, then that really is a demanding call that requires both soul-searching and, really, truth-telling,” Morrell said. Tomasula echoed Morrell’s idea of love that requires action and hard work. “For me, love that doesn’t move beyond a feeling, that’s fine, but not that useful and not that useful for a struggle that Dr. King was engaged in,” Tomasula said. “However, as I said, love can take many forms, and love that takes the form of action seems to be the sort of love that’s needed.” The panel then moved to talk about the next steps to combat racism both at the University and in the world. Ngo cautioned against simply using prayer as an excuse to stay complacent in the fight for racial justice. “We are instruments of God’s plan on Earth, and so if we are praying to God to end racism, how are we acting as instruments to end racism,” she said.McCormick echoed this point, saying that people should not pick and choose when to be involved in the anti-racist movement, but rather fully commit to the cause.“How is it, then, that we encounter one another, learn from one another, engage one another, educate one another, because something beautiful is possible,” McCormick said. “But when we hold back and only choose to opt in here or there or when we choose, something is lost in the process.”The conversation ended with panelists expressing their hopes for the future of equality despite the despair that often arises due to the sheer volume of the task ahead. “I have hope because we’re here,” Page said. “I have hope because of this panel. I have hope because of Walk the Walk Week, not only because of what it represents in terms of our concrete steps to build positive relationships with one another and to engage in a soul-searching, transformational world that will help us live into the aspirations that we have, but also that we are in the process of building things that will stand the test of time and survive all of us. Walk the Walk Week is an institutional investment in the creation of structures that will survive even without those of us that are here.”Tags: Call to Love panel, martin luther king jr. day, Racism, Walk the Walk Weeklast_img read more

Liverpool outclass Palace to go top

first_img Press Association Liverpool’s return to the top of the Premier League was confirmed by an impressive first-half performance which saw Luis Suarez and Daniel Sturridge steal the show in a 3-1 victory. The pair had dispelled suggestions they were not entirely compatible as a front two with all the goals in the 3-1 win at Sunderland last week. This was more of the same as they scored the Reds’ first two, which were followed by a Steven Gerrard penalty for his 99th Premier League goal, in another 3-1 success. It took the strike duo’s tally when both on the pitch at the same time to 16 goals, averaging a goal less than every 70 minutes. Individually their statistics are formidable, together they are devastating. Suarez has 19 goals in his last 22 games, while Sturridge has 19 in 24 games since joining in January, including eight in nine matches this season. Liverpool were up and running after 14 minutes when Victor Moses’ cross-field run delivered the ball to Suarez who instinctively rolled it into the path of the overlapping Jose Enrique. The Spaniard knew exactly what to do, getting to the byline and cutting back to Suarez, who improvised brilliantly as he fell to the ground under pressure from Jason Puncheon, hooking the ball home while on his way down on one knee. Within three minutes Liverpool had doubled their lead, with Suarez and Enrique playing a minor part this time. The Reds left-back tried to pick out the Uruguayan with a long pass out of defence and, with Adrian Mariappa coming out to challenge, the ball went over their heads and put Sturridge in one-on-one with Damien Delaney in the inside-left channel. Sturridge changed directions three times on his way into the penalty area, leaving his marker all at sea, with the final switch giving the England striker just enough room to fire an angled shot across Julian Speroni and inside the far post. Liverpool have never lost a Premier League home game having led by two goals, winning a remarkable 311 of 313 and, despite the odd chance falling Palace’s way, that record was never likely to be threatened. The Enrique, Suarez, Sturridge triumvirate was in overdrive as another incisive move cut open the Palace defence and only the outstretched foot of Delaney prevented Sturridge sliding home. Even when Mamadou Sakho and Martin Skrtel took each other out going for the same ball to put Jimmy Kebe through, Kolo Toure swept up in the six-yard area to prevent the first shot going in and goalkeeper Simon Mignolet saved Puncheon’s follow-up. Sakho’s good fortune continued when he sliced just wide of his own post after Mignolet failed to deal with low left-wing cross. The match was over as a contest in the 38th minute when left-back Dean Moxey’s pull on Raheem Sterling was spotted by assistant referee Richard West. Referee Anthony Taylor pointed to the spot and Gerrard, making his 638th appearance to replace Tommy Smith in seventh place in the club’s all-time list, stroked home. The sight of Rodgers taking his seat in the dug-out before his side had even emerged for the second half told its own story. Palace had a better second half and were eventually rewarded with a goal after taking advantage of Liverpool’s frailties at set-pieces. Half-time substitutes Jose Campana and Dwight Gayle combined with the former curling in a free-kick from out wide on the left and the latter touching it in. Sturridge could have had his second when he hit a post late on and England will hope he can carry that form on to the international stage. last_img read more

DPS, LAPD tackle safety concerns

first_imgIn the wake of the killings of two graduate students in April, the Department of Public Safety will increase its presence on campus and emphasize student awareness.Safety first · The Department of Public Safety and the Los Angeles Police Department are taking measures to increase their presence. – Daily Trojan File PhotoViterbi School of Engineering students Ying Wu and Ming Qu, both 23 years old and from China, were found shot dead in a car on Raymond Avenue near the intersection of 27th Street.Thirty Los Angeles Police Department officers have been added to the University Park area in collaboration with DPS. The number of officers on foot, biking and in plainclothes surveillance details will also increase, according to DPS Assistant Chief John Thomas.“[USC] has undertaken an aggressive education campaign to inform students of the risks of leaving property unattended, dorm rooms unlocked, property exposed within vehicles, walking alone at night and over-consuming alcoholic beverages,” DPS Captain Steve Alegre said.Though many see the additional police presence as a big step for safety, Alegre said student awareness of personal safety is currently the most important factor. DPS has always urged students to be aware of their surroundings, but the school has enacted further measures in light of the April murders.According to Sgt. Jamie Bennett of the LAPD, one of the biggest improvements students will notice in the fall is the presence of officers on campus.“LAPD is going to be on campus; we are there to make you safer,” Bennett said. “My hope is that it is a deterrent to criminals to have us on campus.”Campus Cruiser has also increased the number of drivers for the fall semester.According to DPS Captain David Carlisle, the additional police presence and safety awareness project is part of a continuing campaign to help the university become the safest campus in America.“While eliminating all crime may be unrealistic, it will continue to be our primary goal,” Carlisle said. “Until we accomplish our goal, we will not be satisfied.”DPS sees student awareness as the first step toward reaching this goal.“It is always important to remember that often the key to safety … is smart decision-making by the students,” Thomas said. “Public safety is a partnership, and students can help DPS by making smart decisions that won’t increase their likelihood of becoming the victim of a crime.”The recent crimes near campus have shocked some students into paying more attention to their surroundings.“I never really understood how dangerous the surrounding areas of campus were until the tragic deaths of two USC students,” said Christine Doh, a senior majoring in visual anthropology. “It definitely made me more aware of my surroundings.”Other students who already see and feel the presence of DPS on and off campus said increased DPS and police presence would be a welcome addition.“I’ve never felt uneasy on or immediately off of campus. It feels like every couple of seconds a DPS officer is passing in a car or chariot, and for that they definitely deserve to be recognized,” said Matt Cook, a senior majoring in kinesiology. “Even in the wee hours of the morning, the yellow coats are posted up at every corner guiding me home.”last_img read more