Incredible Fish that Defy Evolution

first_imgThe variety of shapes, colors and ecological niches of fishes prove too much for chance mutations and unguided processes to handle.Carpe solis – sunbathing fish defy the laws of nature (Phys.org). Why don’t those large koi fish we see in garden ponds get sunburn? A study from Linnaeus University says, “The results from the study of sunbathing carp points to a paradigm shift.” Fish aren’t supposed to be able to regulate their body temperature by sunbathing, but these carp can. Not only that, the study showed differences between the fish that point to a high degree of adaptability within the same species and population.That sunbathing may require a refreshing swim to avoid overheating is a vacation experience shared by many. It has been assumed that this cooling effect of water prevents fish from reaping the rewards of sunbathing available to animals in terrestrial environments. New evidence on behavior of carp, published in the Royal Society journal Proceedings B, challenges this paradigm. Sunbathing fish can become warmer than the surrounding water and the gain in body temperature enables the fish to grow faster, the study shows…Different behaviors, appearances and strategies are favorable under different conditions, and variability among individuals may enable populations and species to cope with life in an ever changing world.Ocean-migrating trout adapt to freshwater environment in 120 years (Purdue University). When steelhead trout were stocked in Lake Michigan, it only took them 120 years to adapt to a full-time freshwater lifestyle from a part-time freshwater, part-time saltwater lifestyle. Although the Purdue biologists believe the study provides “deeper understanding into the process of adaptive evolution,” the adaptive processes seem too rapid for unguided random processes like mutation and natural selection. The Purdue researchers identified three chromosomal modifications related to osmoregulation (salt control) and to wound healing, but those processes already existed in the fish, and support vital functions. They appear to have been merely tuned by the new environment. The changes support Randy Guliuzza’s view that genomes are pre-programmed with the ability to adapt to environmental cues (see ICR).Daniel Castranova NICHD/NIH (Phys.org)Researchers identify how eye loss occurs in blind cavefish (Phys.org). Short answer: it’s not a case of neo-Darwinian evolution (genetic mutation and selection). It’s an epigenetic modification, specifically the epigenetic suppression of eye-producing genes. This reduces the cost of making eyes for fish that don’t need them. Moreover, there’s been no real evolution between the subterranean fish and the ones living in surface waters:Despite their dramatic differences, surface and cave morphs share similar genomes and can interbreed. Cave morphs begin eye development early but fail to maintain this program, undergoing eye degeneration within a few days of development. Previous research has not revealed any obvious mutations in genes important for their eye development.Molecular tuning of electroreception in sharks and skates (Nature). Think of the engineering requirements to get any animal to sense electricity or produce it for signaling. In this paper, three evolutionary biologists examine “fine tuning” in electrosensation in sharks and rays (skates), showing how they differ. “Our findings demonstrate how sensory systems adapt to suit the lifestyle or environmental niche of an animal through discrete molecular and biophysical modifications,” they say. You can get a taste of the complexity from the Abstract:Here we analyse shark and skate electrosensory cells to determine whether discrete physiological properties could contribute to behaviourally relevant sensory tuning. We show that sharks and skates use a similar low threshold voltage-gated calcium channel to initiate cellular activity but use distinct potassium channels to modulate this activity. Electrosensory cells from sharks express specially adapted voltage-gated potassium channels that support large, repetitive membrane voltage spikes capable of driving near-maximal vesicular release from elaborate ribbon synapses. By contrast, skates use a calcium-activated potassium channel to produce small, tunable membrane voltage oscillations that elicit stimulus-dependent vesicular release.So far so good. But then they tell us, “Electroreception has independently evolved in many taxa to facilitate particular behaviours ranging from predation to communication.” Stop right there! Evolution cannot “evolve to” do anything; it is unguided, remember? And worse, the statement resorts to ‘convergent evolution’ to explain away the need for belief in multiple miracles of chance (see Darwin Flubber in the Darwin Dictionary). They never explain how evolution worked these miracles. They just state their belief that it did. Science Daily doesn’t explain it, either; its write-up just asserts that “evolution shapes the senses.” That’s using a word, evolution, like an all-purpose magic wand—able to supply any miracle on demand. Look at just a few of the Darwinian miracles required for electrosensing, not counting behavioral responses:In both sea creatures, networks of organs, called ampullae of Lorenzini, constantly survey the electric fields they swim through. Electricity enters the organs through pores that surround the animals’ mouths and form intricate patterns on the bottom of their snouts. Once inside, it is carried via a special gel through a grapevine of canals, ending in bunches of spherical cells that can sense the fields, called electroreceptors. Finally, the cells relay this information onto the nervous system by releasing packets of chemical messengers, called neurotransmitters, into communication points, or synapses, made with neighboring neurons.Can Evolutionists Explain Fish Evolution?Resolving the ray-finned fish tree of life (PNAS). Michael Alfaro struggles with the enormous diversity of fish. How does a Darwinian hang them all on a single branching tree diagram?When it comes to vertebrate evolutionary history, our understanding of lobe-finned fishes—the branch of the vertebrate tree leading to coelacanths plus the tetrapods (amphibians, turtles, birds, crocodiles, lizards, snakes, and mammals)—far outstrips our knowledge of ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii). Actinopterygians exhibit extraordinary species richness (>33,000 described species) and have evolved a staggering diversity in morphology and ecology over their 400+ million y history. Ray-finned fishes include some of the smallest vertebrates [the adult cyprinid Paedocypris progenetica measure just under 8 mm], some of the largest (adult ocean sunfish weigh more than 2,000 kg), some of the longest (oarfishes may reach a length of more than 13 m), some of the longest lived [rougheye rockfishes, Sebastes aleutianus, may live for more than 200 y], and some of the shortest lived [the coral reef pygmy goby, Eviota sigillata, has a maximum lifespan of 59 d]. In marine waters, ray-finned fishes include the tremendously diverse and ecologically rich coral reef fish families, such as wrasses, angelfishes, butterfly fishes, and damselfishes, and they comprise most important commercial and recreational fishing stocks. Within freshwaters, ray-finned fishes have produced several ecologically dominant radiations, including cyprinids, characiforms, catfishes, and cichlids. Efforts to reconstruct the phylogenetic history of this group have proven extremely challenging, especially within acanthomorphs, a hyperdiverse subclade comprising almost two-thirds of all ray-finned fish species.Alfaro bluffs that evolutionary understanding of lobe-finned fishes is better than that of ray-finned fishes, because he has Tiktaalik in mind, along with some other alleged intermediate forms that Darwinians believe show a progression to land-based tetrapods. He should have read Clement and Long’s article on The Conversation (next).It’s less than 2cm long, but this 400 million year old fossil fish changes our view of vertebrate evolution (The Conversation). Alice Clement and John Long wear their D-Merit Badges proudly, but tell their readers that fish have “a complicated family tree.” They excitedly share their latest alleged transitional form, a fossil named Lingulalepis, but the article undermines the bluffing confidence of Alfaro’s paper. “Our findings highlight that the evolutionary family tree of the first bony fishes is much more complicated than we had thought,” they say in Tontological form, “demonstrating the importance of palaeontology to help us more accurately understand our distant origins.”A tetrapod fauna from within the Devonian Antarctic Circle (Science Magazine). If you think Darwinians had their story together about fish becoming tetrapods, read this paper by Per Ahlberg and Robert Gess. Tiktaalik and its relatives were found in tropical or subtropical locations, but now these two evolutionists found candidates in the Antarctic. “Thus, the distribution of tetrapods may have been global, which encourages us to rethink the environments in which this important group was shaped.” Not only that, Gess & Ahlberg upset the applecart more. They confirm that the Polish tetrapod trackways, dated earlier than Tiktaalik, confound the story of tetrapod evolution. They they throw in some soft tissue preservation! To creationists, that challenges the Darwinian belief in millions of years.The Waterloo Farm tetrapod fossils and the Middle Devonian tetrapod trackways from Poland and Ireland challenge the popular scenario of a tropical origin of tetrapods during the Late Devonian. Tetrapods originated no later than the Eifelian (early Middle Devonian), when they were present in southern Laurussia; by the late Famennian (latest Devonian), they ranged from the tropics to the south polar regions. This geographic pattern could still point to a tropical origin but may simply be a sampling artifact. Against this background, the continued investigation of nontropical localities such as Waterloo Farm must be a priority. Waterloo Farm is also the only known Devonian tetrapod locality to feature soft-tissue preservation, as exemplified by the earliest known lamprey, Priscomyzon. The locality thus has the potential not only to cast new light on early tetrapod biogeography and evolution, but also to illuminate unknown aspects of their morphology.Same story, different habitat. The facts line up against Darwinism, but no matter what the conflict with reality, the Darwinians persist in their belief. They say a new study “sheds light on evolution” or “helps us more accurately understand our distant origins.” Resolution of any and all difficulties is passed on to futureware, giving the Darwin Party perennial job security for storytellers (25 June 2014). What a scam!— or should we say, What a fish story! ‘You should have seen the one that got away from Darwin!’(Visited 528 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Sharpness Analysis: GH4 vs. RED Epic vs. 5D Mark III

first_imgIs the Panasonic GH4 sharper than RED Epic & 5D Mark III? This video says yes.As equipment gets cheaper to make, the gap between high-end professional video equipment and everyday consumer equipment becomes smaller and smaller. The following comparison video illustrates this perfectly by comparing the sharpness of a Panasonic GH4, RED Epic, and 5D Mark III.Now of course, this video only judges sharpness and not other important factors including dynamic range and color, but it does show us that times are changing. With a RED Epic package costing over $20,000 dollars, the lesser $1,700 GH4 is proving it’s worth in the filmmaking and video production world.Here’s the video:I know what you’re thinking, this can’t be true. Well we thought the same thing, but if you download the footage you can clearly see that the GH4 is much sharper than the other two.Joe Marine of NoFilmSchool states that he believes this overwhelming GH4 victory is due to the way the GH4 processes data. The Red and Mark III both do minimal internal sharpening when recording. The GH4 on the other hand does a lot of internal processing to minimize post processing.Even so, the GH4 is one of the best values on the market right now. But sharpness aside how does the GH4 compare overall to the Mark iii? The following video gives us a clear answer:What do you think of these results? Are you looking to buy a GH4? Share in the comments below.last_img read more

Arellano zooms to 2-0 card

first_imgPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netArellano University imposed its edge in experience to crush San Beda, 25-22, 25-21, 25-18, Wednesday and remain unbeaten in the Premier Volleyball League Collegiate Conference at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.Jovelyn Prado and Regine Arocha led the Lady Chiefs in scoring their second straight victory and at the same time providing a glimpse of what to expect from the reigning NCAA women’s champions.ADVERTISEMENT Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side San Sebastian similarly downed Jose Rizal University in straight sets, 25-23, 25-22, 25-21, in the second game to barge into the win column.Prado fired 16 points, while Arocha added 15 for Arellano, bringing to fore the skills and smarts they have learned from playing in the previous PVL Open Conference.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games opening“In the Open Conference we faced better players which allowed us to level up our game,” said Prado in Filipino.That level was in full display as Arellano ran plays like a sure-footed veteran squad against the Lady Red Spikers, whose bevy of power hitters just could not get their game going. MOST READ Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Issa Viray and Chesca Racraquin tried to hammer their way against the formidable defense of Arellano, scoring 12 and 9 points, respectively.The Lady Chiefs, who downed the St. Benilde Lady Blazers in the opener (25-20, 25-22, 25-17), were never in trouble in the match as coach Obet Javier’s squad was on-point throughout.San Beda took a 16-13 lead in the second set but Mary Anne Esguerra and Necole Ebuen triggered a 5-1 binge to put things in order.“They tried to load up on their serves, that’s why they managed to take the lead,” said Prado, the team captain. “But that’s where we held on to our receives even better.”San Beda, which bested Technological Institute of the Philippines (25-13, 25-18, 25-27, 25-13) in its opener, fell to 1-1.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Azkals draw with Yemenis, stay on topcenter_img LATEST STORIES NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelolast_img read more

FIFA may as well lock Suarez into Guantanamo Bay: Maradona

first_imgGiorgio Chiellini complains after Suarez ran into his shoulder with his teeth Diego Maradona blasted FIFA’s ban on Uruguay striker Luis Suarez as “criminal” and said world soccer’s governing body might as well handcuff the striker and lock him up in Guantanamo prison. “Who did Suarez kill?” Maradona said during his soccer commentary programme broadcast on Venezuela’s Telesur and Argentine public television on Thursday night.”This is football, this is contact,” the Argentine legend said. “They may as well handcuff him and bring him to Guantanamo directly.”The controversial US prison in Cuba, opened during the Bush administration, is heavily criticized by human rights groups for indefinite imprisonment of many detainees without charge or trial.Temperamental 1986 World Cup winner Maradona, known for his flamboyant declarations, is echoing outrage in Uruguay, where many are fuming at a ban they deem exaggerated, hypocritical or outright biased.Many abroad, however, were horrified by brilliant but volatile Suarez’s biting of Italian defender Giorgio Chiellini on Tuesday.Suarez was given longest sanction imposed at a World Cup by soccer’s governing body on Thursday, suspended from all football-related activity for four months and banned for nine international matches.But Maradona, who like Suarez emerged from a poor background to rise to global fame, fervently defended “Luisito” throughout the programme, at the end even unveiling a T-shirt with “We’re with you Luisito” scrawled on the front.”If he made a mistake, fine, they should punish him, but they shouldn’t exaggerate, they shouldn’t be moralistic,” said Maradona, who is close to Cuba’s former president Fidel Castro.advertisementLeftist Uruguayan president Jose Mujica also phoned in to the programme, blasting what he saw as a move to sideline Uruguay from the tournament where many European heavyweights have bit the dust.”We kicked out Italy, we kicked out England, how much money was lost there?,” said Mujica, a 79 year-old former guerrilla. “We’re Uruguay, we’re very little. It was cheap (for them to do).”The European establishment could not understand Suarez’s tough street style, Mujica and Maradona opined.”Incredible players are often born here in the heart of poverty,” Mujica said. “They don’t understand him because they don’t want to and because they were born in another society with other resources.”last_img read more