Mosquito Control Programme Strengthened

first_img Dr. Tufton said the Government of Jamaica is appreciative of the partnership with the USAID, which has facilitated ongoing support to reduce mosquito breeding and vector-borne diseases. The country’s vector management programme has been strengthened with the opening of the Mosquito Control and Research Unit (MCRU) Insectary at the University of West Indies (UWI) Mona campus in St. Andrew.A joint initiative of the Ministry of Health and UWI through support from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the facility will provide for entomological study ad research aimed at controlling mosquito-borne diseases such as chikungunya, Zika, dengue fever and malaria.It will serve as Jamaica’s national mosquito control and research laboratory, complementing the insectary at the National Public Health Laboratory on Slipe Pen Road in Kingston.Speaking at the opening ceremony on Tuesday (Jan. 9), Health Minister, Dr. the Hon. Christopher Tufton, said the establishment of the MCRU insectary “demonstrates another significant step to help advance and sustain Jamaica’s commitment to mosquito control.”It is equipped with new microscopes, supplies and equipment to advance scientific and operational research.Dr. Tufton said the Government of Jamaica is appreciative of the partnership with the USAID, which has facilitated ongoing support to reduce mosquito breeding and vector-borne diseases.The USAID, under its Zika AIRS Project (ZAP), funded the refurbishing of office and laboratory space for the MCRU, which was launched last year and the establishment of the insectary at the national lab.The MCRU unit was set up to foster data-driven monitoring and decision-making; explore innovative tools and methodologies; and build technical operational and research capacity as it relates to mosquito control.UWI Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Mona campus Principal, Professor McDonald, in his remarks, said the institution is “extremely pleased” to partner with the Ministry on the initiative and also hailed the support from USAID.He said the institution envisions the full integration of the MCRU into the research and teaching endeavours of the Mona campus.“It will certainly add to our efforts to modernise all of our facilities… (as) we continue to serve our stakeholders in Jamaica and across the Caribbean,” he noted.In his remarks, Chargé d’Affaires at the US Embassy in Jamaica, Eric Khant, said advancing public health was among the priorities of the US’ engagement with the Caribbean.He contended that infectious diseases like Zika “know no borders (so) we must work together to protect our citizens.”Mr. Khant noted that the insectaries’ combined resources will provide the Ministry and UWI with “adequate space to complete the necessary surveillance and research activities to elevate mosquito control efforts in Jamaica.”The ZAP project is designed to enhance the USAID’s ability to implement vector control and entomological monitoring programmes in Latin America and the Caribbean. Story Highlights Speaking at the opening ceremony on Tuesday (Jan. 9), Health Minister, Dr. the Hon. Christopher Tufton, said the establishment of the MCRU insectary “demonstrates another significant step to help advance and sustain Jamaica’s commitment to mosquito control.” The country’s vector management programme has been strengthened with the opening of the Mosquito Control and Research Unit (MCRU) Insectary at the University of West Indies (UWI) Mona campus in St. Andrew.last_img read more

Passenger vehicle retail sales tumble 11 to 243183 units in July FADA

first_imgNew Delhi: Retail sales of passenger vehicles (PV) declined by 11 per cent to 2,43,183 units in July as compared to the same period last year, hit by weak demand across the country, automobile dealers’ body FADA said on Monday. According to Federation of Automobile Dealers Associations (FADA), PV sales stood at 2,74,772 units in July 2018. Two-wheeler sales declined by 5 per cent to 13,32,384 units last month as compared to 14,03,382 units in the year-ago period. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalCommercial vehicle sales dropped by 14 per cent to 23,118 units against 26,815 units in July last year. Three-wheeler sales, however, saw an increase of 3 per cent to 55,850 units last month from 54,250 units in the same period a year ago. Total sales across categories declined by 6 per cent to 16,54,535 units in July as against 17,59,219 units. “Consumer sentiment and overall demand continued to be quite weak across all segments and most geographies,” FADA President Ashish Kale said. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostWith PV manufacturers reducing wholesale billings as well as regulating production, inventory levels is now very close to 21 days level. Average inventory for PVs currently ranges from 25-30 days, he added. “CV inventory continues to remain at high levels…FADA urges OEM’s to help regulate this inventory at the earliest by regulating wholesale supplies,” Kale said. Average inventory for CV ranges from 55-60 days. He also pointed out to high level of inventory in the two-wheeler segment which currently ranges between 60-65 days. “We would once again urge and request all our two wheeler OEM’s to help regulate this inventory to regular levels of three weeks and help our members avoid the perils associated with high inventory,” Kale said. FADA represents over 15,000 automobile dealers who run around 25,000 dealerships across the country.last_img read more

Humans reshaping evolutionary history of species around the globe paper

first_imgThe Canadian Press VANCOUVER — Swallows are evolving smaller, more manoeuvrable wings to help them dodge buildings and vehicles.Some fish are growing mouths that are smaller and harder to hook.Large animals from caribou to tuna are disappearing.Meanwhile, it’s boom time for anything not too fussy about where it lives or what it eats.“It’s a reshaping of the tree of life,” said Sarah Otto, a University of British Columbia researcher, whose paper was published Wednesday by the London-based Proceedings of the Royal Society.Otto, a much-awarded and highly regarded theoretical biologist, says the activities and presence of human beings have become one of the largest drivers of evolutionary change everywhere on the planet.“Human impacts on the world are not just local,” she said. “They are changing the course of evolutionary history for all species on the planet, and that’s a remarkable concept to ponder.”Earth scientists have long discussed the idea of the Anthropocene — a period of Earth’s history defined by geological markers of human impact. Otto, after reviewing dozens of research papers, concludes the planet’s biology is becoming similarly marked as plants and animals respond to human pressure.Her paper is replete with examples from bird species slowly forgetting to migrate to mosquito breeds adapted specifically to underground subway tunnels.Backyard bird feeders are behind changes in the beak shape and strength of house finches. Different mammals are becoming nocturnal as a way to avoid human conflict. Introduced species change the ground rules for native plants and animals.It’s a mistake to think evolution requires millennia, said Otto.“Evolution happens really fast if the selection regimes are strong. We can see sometimes in plant populations evolutionary change in the course of years.”If the changes come too fast for evolution to keep up, there’s always extinction.Rates of species loss are now estimated to be 1,000 times higher than they were before human domination. More than one in five of all plant and animal species are considered at risk.Extinctions have always happened. But Otto said they’re happening at such a pace and in response to such similar pressures that they are reducing the ability of evolution to respond to change.“We’re losing the ability for evolution to bounce back.”Forcing species into a human-formed box reduces variability, leaving evolution less to work with in response to future changes. And wiping species out removes them forever.“If we’re eliminating the large-bodied mammals, even if humans went extinct on the planet, we’re not going to see an immediate return of ecosystems to have the right balance of small, medium and large species,” Otto said. “We’re cutting off options. We’re cutting off options both within species by eliminating variability, and we’re also cutting off options at the tree of life level by cutting off species.”  Species that are doing well are generalists — crows, coyotes, dandelions.“The ones that can both tolerate and thrive in human-altered environments,” said Otto. “The pigeons and the rats.”The biggest single human-caused evolutionary pressure, Otto said, is climate change.  “The No. 1 thing we have to do is tackle climate change. If we don’t do that, we’re going to lose a lot more species.”— By Bob Weber in Edmonton. Follow @row1960 on Twitter last_img read more

Affordable Housing Assistance To Be Offered To Residents At Town Hall On

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Metro North Regional Housing Services Office’s Housing Coordinator Laurie Stanton will be holding office hours on Tuesday, September 10, 2019, from 2pm to 4:30pm, in Wilmington Town Hall’s Small Conference Room. Stanton will assist residents with their affordable housing questions.The Metro North Regional Housing Services Office helps people find affordable housing in Reading, North Reading, Wilmington, and Saugus.If you are unable to attend office hours on this date, future dates will be announced. Laurie can also be reached at her Reading Office at 781-942-6667 during normal business hours.(NOTE: The above announcement is from the Town of Wilmington.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedAffordable Housing Assistance To Be Offered To Residents At Town Hall On October 2In “Government”Affordable Housing Assistance To Be Offered To Residents At Town Hall On April 25In “Government”Affordable Housing Assistance To Be Offered To Residents On December 5 & December 19 At Town HallIn “Government”last_img read more

How dogs can walk on ice without freezing their paws

first_img Explore further Scientists in Japan have solved a long-standing veterinary mystery: how dogs can stand and walk for so long on snow and ice without apparent discomfort, and without freezing their paws. Scientists at Tokyo’s Yamazaki Gakuen University wondered why dogs do not seem to feel the cold in their paws, even though the paws have less insulating fur than their trunks. The paws have pads containing a high fat content, which freezes less easily than other tissues, but they also have a high surface area-to-volume ratio, which means they should lose heat easily.In humans exposed to frigid temperatures, vasoconstriction occurs in the extremities to reduce the blood flow and resultant heat loss, and ensure the blood returning to the rest of the body does not cool too much. The research team, led by Dr. Hiroyoshi Ninomiya, used a scanning electron microscope to study the paws of four adult dogs, and discovered that the arteries supplying blood to the pads had networks of numerous small veins, or venules, closely associated with them, and that the system essentially acts as a counter-current heat exchanger. When warm blood arrives in the paws via the arteries, heat is transferred to the venules closely associated with the arteries, thus ensuring the blood has been warmed up before it returns to the rest of the body.The counter-current heat exchange system prevents the body cooling and ensures the paw temperature stays within reasonable limits. The same system has also been identified in other animals such as Antarctic penguins, where it occurs in their legs and wings, and dolphins, which use a heat exchange system in their fins. The Arctic Fox (Vulpes lagopus) was already known to have a counter-current heat exchange system in its paws, along with numerous other adaptations to the cold, but the existence of such a system in domestic dogs had not been previously suspected or identified. The findings suggest that domestic dogs might have originated in a cold climate, in which such a system would have had survival benefits.Domesticated dogs are not all able to withstand icy conditions on their paws to the same extent, depending on their environment (such as habitually living indoors), and the breed. Common tips often suggested to help domestic dogs avoid cold feet in winter is to ensure their pads are not split or injured in any way, and to spray their paws with cooking spray before taking them out in the snow. Frostbite is very rare in dogs, but it can occur.The paper is published in the journal Veterinary Dermatology. More information: Veterinary Dermatology, Volume 22, Issue 6, pages 475–481, December 2011. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-3164.2011.00976.x © 2011 PhysOrg.comcenter_img Citation: How dogs can walk on ice without freezing their paws (2012, January 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-01-dogs-ice-paws.html Through sunshine, bitter cold, dogs need exercise This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more