Timeline of Emotions: The Challenges of Military Families Experiencing Deployment

first_imgBy: Jason M. Jowers, MS, MFT Return to article. Long DescriptionPixabay[Army Deployment by skeeze on June 30, 2014, CC0]As a service professional, it is important to understand the impact of deployment when working with members of military families. Deployments are a trying time for military families. There are also unique challenges that each member of a military family will face throughout the cycle of deployment.This blog from The National Military Family Association goes over the various phases that a military family can expect to go through. These are broken down into seven phases and highlight certain emotional responses within each. It is also important to note that each family is unique and may experience these phases differently or at different times. Let’s take a look at these different phases and how we as service professionals might help military families cope throughout the deployment cycle.Phase 1 focuses on the anticipation of loss and begins with receiving deployment orders.Phase 2 deals with the detachment and withdrawal that families may experience.Phase 3 is defined by a sense of disorganization, especially in disruption of routines and emotions.Phase 4 is all about reestablishing routines.Phase 5 focuses on the news and anticipation of homecoming for the service member.Phase 6 is when the service member finally returns home.And finally, Phase 7 addresses the reintegration of the family.It is important to note that this article further breaks down issues that may arise between couples as well as for children in the family. One key component to remember to share with family members is that they are not alone. Military families are strong and they can rely on each other and other families in their communities for support.For more on resources and programs that support military families, be sure to head over to the National Military Family Association website and learn more about their mission to help support military service members and their families year-round. Also, MFLN Family Development has lots of great resources! This past blog post, “From the Front Lines to the Front Door: Going Back to Family Life after Deployment,” addresses the reintegration process of returning military service members to their families.ReferencesBoice, M.J. (2017). Deployment Cycle of Emotions: No, You’re Not Crazy. National Military Family Association. Retrieved from: https://www.militaryfamily.org/deployment-cycle-of-emotions/This post was written by Jason M. Jowers, MS, MFT, of the MFLN Family Development Team. The Family Development team aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network Family Development concentration on our website, Facebook, and Twitter.  You can also listen to our Anchored. podcast series via iTunes and our website. Army Deployment of Soldiers lining up to get on a military planelast_img read more

The Invisible Force Ruining Your Culture

first_imgThere is a force that causes businesses to produce results that are far less than the those they are capable of creating. It causes them to lose the talented employees they need, and it causes them to treat their clients and customers poorly—and in some cases, to treat them as adversaries. Like all of the most powerful forces on Earth, it is invisible to the naked eye. This force is negativity.The Only Cancer That Spreads by Contact  Negativity is the only cancer that spreads by contact. It is passed from Patient Zero, the carrier, to the people with whom they come into contact. It starts with Patient Zero complaining about “the way things are” and “the way things should be,” even though the person infected with negativity never does anything to make things better. To do something about things that might be better, you have to be a positive, optimistic, future-oriented individual with the ability to see things as better than they are and work towards that vision.Patient Zero’s complaints starts to infect susceptible Future Hosts with a seductive idea, the idea that none of the challenges or problems are the fault of Patient Zero or the Future Host. Instead, the problems are external forces working on Patient Zero and their prospective Host.The problems come from their unreasonable difficult clients, the ones that no one could serve because they are so needy, always asking for help producing the results they need. Other problems are the result of Patient Zero’s inept leadership team who is nowhere near as smart as Patient Zero. Then there are the other employees, the ones who actually believe that they do good work and make a difference for their clients. Over time, because Patient Zero continues to whisper in the ears of those who are keen to believe that nothing is their fault, there are new Hosts carrying the infection and infecting others. At some point, because the disease presses on unopposed, it runs rampant.Fighting the Infection  The advice given to boxers before a fight is apt advice here: “Protect yourself at all times.” If you are a leader, protect your culture at all times.If you don’t know who Patient Zero is, it’s likely they are right now reshaping your culture to one that is negative. If you know who Patient Zero is and have done nothing to protect yourself, your team, and your culture, their infection is likely already spreading throughout your company, making your culture something that repels good people instead of attracting them.To create a positive, optimistic, future-oriented, and empowered culture, you have to remove people who work against those ends before they destroy your culture. You have to work twice as hard on shaping a culture around beliefs and values that bring out the best in people, that provide them with a sense of agency, and that allows to do meaningful work.last_img read more