Crowd violence mars Millwalls win over Everton

first_imgA crowd violence before the FA Cup tie between Millwall and Everton has left a man severely injured in the face.Millwall left it late to seal a dramatic 3-2 win to send the Toffees crashing out of the FA Cup fourth round, but the crowd violence seems to have overshadowedThe Metropolitan Police have yet to make any arrests after footage appeared on social media purporting to show a brawl in the Hawkstone Road area in south-east London.Officers became aware of a large group of males fighting in that area at 4.42pm.Millwall & Everton: Horrific fan violence exterior Surrey Quays station https://t.co/pizZnJnotD pic.twitter.com/HIMPhCDmGO— punga007 (@punga127) January 26, 2019Everton still keen on signing Juve’s Moise Kean Obinna Echi – July 28, 2019 Everton are still pushing for the signature of Juventus striker Moise Kean despite the Italian champions insisting they’d only sanction the deal with a…A man in his 20s was taken to hospital but his injuries are not life-threatening. A crime scene remained in place into Saturday evening.Detective Inspector Darren Young said via Sky: “The behaviour of those involved in this incident is nothing short of disgraceful and those involved can be certain we will be working to identify them.“We are aware of the video circulating online, which has quite rightly elicited shock and disgust. We are looking at it and urge anyone with information that could assist police to call 101 referring CAD 5117/26 Jan.”The match ended in a 3-2 victory to Millwall after they scored a late winner.last_img read more

Apple allegedly plotted to hurt Qualcomm years before it sued the company

first_img Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Apple and Qualcomm settle: Here’s what it means for your next iPhone Apple and Qualcomm settle licensing dispute amid trial’s opening arguments Intel says it will exit 5G phone modems just hours after Apple, Qualcomm settle Apple, Qualcomm make opening arguments just before settlement is unveiled Apple, Qualcomm head into latest legal battle, with billions at stake reading • Apple allegedly ‘plotted’ to hurt Qualcomm years before it sued the company 34 Originally published at 10:14 a.m. PTUpdate at 11:27 a.m. PT: Adds comments from Apple’s opening argument Apple and Qualcomm battled over licensing fees for two years. Viva Tung/CNET Before Apple ever filed suit against Qualcomm, the iPhone maker allegedly wanted to hurt the company. And it put those plans down in documents obtained by Qualcomm as the two companies prepared to meet in court.  Slides with details of those documents — viewed by reporters in court, including CNET — have now been made public. You can see the full slides here (and below). In September 2014, a document from Apple titled “QCOM – Future scenarios” detailed ways the company could exert pressure on Qualcomm, including by working with Intel on 4G modems for the iPhone. Apple and its manufacturing partners didn’t actually file suit against Qualcomm until more than two years later. A second page of that document, titled “QCM – Options and recommendations (2/2)” revealed that Apple considered it “beneficial to wait to provoke a patent fight until after the end of 2016,” when its contracts with Qualcomm would expire.  “They were plotting it for two years,” Qualcomm attorney Evan Chesler, of the firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore, said during his opening arguments last week. “It was all planned in advance. Every bit of it.” apple-slideAn Apple internal document talked about ways to pressure Qualcomm. Screenshot by Shara Tibken/CNET The news came out during Qualcomm’s opening statement in last week’s aborted trial. News broke of a settlement before Chesler had wrapped up his opening remarks. CNET was in the courtroom for the opening arguments. Because the two parties settled, Apple never had a chance to rebut Qualcomm’s claims in its opening arguments.Apple in January 2017 had accused Qualcomm of anticompetitive practices that have raised chip prices, restricted competition and hurt customer choice. The company and its manufacturing partners had argued that Qualcomm’s royalty fees, which Qualcomm based on a customer’s entire device, were too high and that they should pay only for the company’s modem chips. Qualcomm, the world’s biggest mobile chipmaker, had countered that the iPhone wouldn’t be possible without its technology, and it deserved to be paid for its innovation. The settlement marked a big win for Qualcomm, which could have been forced to change its entire business model had it lost to Apple. The agreement is also a victory for consumers, who will once again have access to fast Qualcomm modems — including ones already compatible with existing 5G networks. Apple in its opening arguments said that Qualcomm’s licensing practices have hurt competitors like Intel. And Qualcomm’s policy of no license, no chips — it won’t provide a handset maker with modems until it signs a licensing agreement — “allows them to double dip.””This case is about the fact that Qualcomm has used its monopoly … to set unfair prices and stifle competition and dictate terms to some of the biggest, most powerful companies in the world, that rational companies would never agree to in a million years,” said Ruffin Cordell, an attorney with Fish & Richardson who’s representing Apple. Exerting commercial pressure The unknown Apple team behind the September 2014 document recommended applying “commercial pressure against Qualcomm” by switching to Intel modems in iPhones. Apple ultimately started using Intel modems in about half of its iPhones with devices that came out in 2016. In the US, it embedded Intel modems in AT&T and T-Mobile models of the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus, but it still used Qualcomm in versions for Verizon and Sprint. Phones Components Tech Industry See All Tags Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors • Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 Patents Qualcomm 5G 4G LTE Apple Share your voice Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Comments Qualcomm, for its part, knew by June 2014 about Apple’s plans to use Intel chips in 2016, according to an internal email from its president, Cristiano Amon, that was displayed during opening arguments. “Decision already has been made and beyond the point of no return on the 2nd source (Intel) for the 2016 premium tier,” Amon wrote to CEO Steve Mollenkopf, CTO Jim Thompson, General Counsel Don Rosenberg and then-licensing chief Derek Aberle. Apple “said that as a result of our policies, other chip companies can’t compete with us,” Chesler said during his opening arguments. “Where did Intel get the chips from? From god? They made them using our technology.” Another Apple internal document from June 2016 said the company wanted to “create leverage by building pressure three ways,” according to a slide shown in court. The internal document said, in part, that Apple wanted to “hurt Qualcomm financially” and “put Qualcomm’s business model at risk.” The best patents Qualcomm supplies network connectivity chips for Apple’s iPhones and is the world’s biggest provider of mobile chips. Its technology is essential for connecting phones to cellular networks. The company derives a significant portion of its revenue from licensing its inventions to hundreds of device makers, with the fee based on the value of the phone, not the components.  Qualcomm owns patents related to 3G, 4G and 5G phones — as well as other features like software — so any handset makers building a device that connects to the networks has to pay it a licensing fee, even if they don’t use Qualcomm’s chips.  Apple had purchased Qualcomm modems for its iPhones for years until the falling out. One 2009 memo said Qualcomm is “widely considered the owner of the strongest patent portfolio for essential and relevant patents for wireless standards.”  “Engineering wise, they have been the best,” Johny Srouji, Apple’s head of semiconductors, said in a March 2015 email.  The earlier memo also noted that while more than half of Qualcomm’s patent portfolio was communications and silicon engineering, it “has more significant holdings in other areas, including many areas relevant to Apple.” That included media processing, non-cellular communications and hardware. Apple had argued in its lawsuit that Qualcomm’s technology was only used in its modem and it shouldn’t be forced to pay Qualcomm royalties for innovations it had nothing to do with.  “What makes your smartphone smart is what the people up the road in La Jolla invented,” Chesler said in court, referring to the San Diego-area town where Qualcomm’s offices are based. “The reason they pay us more is because what we created is worth more.” See also Applelast_img read more

Quest for the uncharted formless

first_imgBahaar Dhawan Rohatgi is a self-taught artist whose works are embedded with soul and passion. Prior to involving herself with art Bahaar has been working with a leading law firm for over five years. While her stint at the law firm gave her the opportunity to work on several high stake matters, painting remained in her heart and soul.Each canvas is brought to life with her use of a range of different mediums. Some of her painting series are also inspirations she had derived from life. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfNocturnal Series: This is a series of Bahaar’s artworks that revolve around the curious creature- owl. Some myths associate owls with wisdom, others with wealth- the Uluka (owl) is goddess Lakshmi’s vahana (vehicle), while some others view them as fortune tellers capable of having supernatural connections. Bahaar is intrigued by this creature for the mystery surrounding it.Inner Reflection Series: This series started when Bahaar was going through a transitional phase while exploring and garnering the courage to pursue her passion full time. She wanted to implore the visions in her mind to stay, long enough, without distraction of other impeding responsibilities. Even when her mind was seeking responses, she had no time to register any. Here the ‘Inner Reflection’ series was born- the artworks reflect the inner peace and celebration of personal space. Bahaar believes in the theory of feminism and most of her subjects revolve around women. There is immense ease in expressing emotions through a woman and this series encapsulates those experiences. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveInterstellar Series: In this series, her quest is for the uncharted formless. The interstellar space has no dimensions or theme governing it. The endeavour has been to create a whole new experience and throw people’s mind out of gear, for them to question- What really lays behind the night sky? The beauty about abstraction is that it is not always a planned journey. Some of the recent exhibitions that Bahaar has been a part of would include Masters of Modern Art, Conversation, Triptych Parade and Pop up show. Recently Bahaar was chosen by Morjarto (a platform for artist by NDTV India) to present her artwork to actor Sonakshi Sinha.last_img read more

Road rage Reckless bus mows down 5yrold at Nagerbazar

first_imgKolkata: Two persons including a five-year-old girl died in the city in two separate accidents in Nagerbazar and Chinar Park.The traffic at Nagerbazar came to a halt on Tuesday as local people put up a blockade after a five-year-old girl was crushed under the wheels of the bus in which she was travelling. Immediately after the incident, the locals got agitated, protesting against the death of the child due to rash and negligent driving. The girl, identified as Anushka Kar, was a resident of Kalindi near Lake Town and studied at a local English medium school in class one. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseOn Tuesday morning, the five-year-old had boarded a private bus while travelling to her school, accompanied by her mother. Witnesses said that as soon as the mother-daughter duo got down at Kajipara near Nagerbazar, the bus increased its speed at an alarming rate and before the child could move from the spot, the rear wheels of the bus crushed her underneath. The child was immediately taken to a nearby hospital, where the doctors declared her brought dead. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataAfter the incident, local people took to protests in anger over the incident, blocking the road. But even after the police arrived at the spot, the locals refused to withdraw the blockade. Eventually, an altercation erupted between police and the protesters. The locals complained that although the vehicles move recklessly in the area during the wee hours, the police have not taken any adequate measure. The footpath has been taken away by the hawkers, leaving no sidewalk for the pedestrians. The area has become an accident-prone zone as a result. The protesters further claimed that if no action is taken to ensure the safety of common people, the blockade will continue. A resident of the area said: “The little child died as the driver drove the bus in an extremely reckless manner. Exemplary punishment should be given to the perpetrator. Police need to be strict against the rash drivers.” Although police seized the bus which mowed down the child, the driver had managed to escape. The condition in the area later returned to normal in the evening, as the locals ceased their protests. In another incident, at around 3.45 am on Tuesday, a truck which was coming from New Town rammed into another smaller truck, arriving from the Rajarhat Road at Chinar Park, resulting in the death of one person, leaving seven others injured. The injured were later admitted to a local hospital in New Town. The deceased has been identified as a resident of the Basirhat area, a 30-year-old man identified as Bablu Mondal, who succumbed to his injuries at the hospital. Both the vehicles have been detained. A case of causing death by negligence has been initiated.last_img read more

When Faced With a Busy Signal One Activist Turned a Music App

first_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global 4 min read May 30, 2017 Just after the inauguration in January 2017, Nathaniel Teichman, chief operating officer of an audio sharing app, went to a rally for Planned Parenthood in Washington Square Park in New York City. He saw a problem. Activists who called the offices of their representatives in Congress became stuck on hold and had to endure long waits before they could voice their messages. “It seemed like there had to be a way to use technology to make it easier for people to take part in the democratic process,” said Teichman, 30, who studied business at Columbia University. Since graduating, Teichman had wanted to pair his business background with his passion for music. In 2015 he began working for Venmo co-founder Iqram Magdon-Ismail on an app called Ense. It functions like an audio version of Twitter allowing musicians to share sound clips. After the election of President Donald J. Trump inspired Teichman to political action, he wondered if Ense’s model could be repurposed so that citizens could share their personal stories with their representatives. Related: Getting Started With Small Business App DevelopmentIn early 2017 he began working pro-bono on nights and weekends with collaborators, Aneesh Bhoopathy and Phil Ditzler, whom he met through Ense. With “a little bit of computing magic and a little bit of manual labor,” he said, they co-founded the app Stance. It delivers audio clips, many of them wrenching testimonials, from users’ mouths straight into representatives voicemails. For the activist on the go, Stance means no more navigating automated phone prompts, no more waiting on hold, and no more being unable to get through when call volumes run at flood levels. During the House vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act, for example, some 7,000 new people used Stance to make themselves heard. “It’s using audio sharing technology to get people more involved,” said Randy Lee, 50, a partner at Limebeat Studios in Manhattan, who also collaborated with Teichman.Since its launch in early March, more than 20,000 people have downloaded Stance on their iPhones and Androids, Teichman said. All of them have the choice to also have their audio messages publicly tweeted at their representatives. When New York City-based web designer Ryan Giglio chose this in late March, because he was worried about a bill that could weaken internet privacy, his representative, Democrat Carolyn Maloney, tweeted back at him.“I think the app is great, it’s a great low-friction way of participating in a very high-friction system,” Giglio said.In an e-mail, Maloney said, “Any new technology that better enables constituents to reach out to their representatives is a change for the better.” Related: How to Include Politics in Your Marketing Without Turning Anyone OffShe’s not the only member of Congress learning about Stance. In Montana, Democratic Senator Jon Tester began fielding questions from reporters about the new ways he is hearing from his constituents through apps like Stance and Countable.  “It doesn’t matter if it is through an app, mail, e-mail, phone or fax, people should always be able to contact their representation,” Tester e-mailed. “As technology advances, it’s critical that members of Congress are able to hear from their constituents in as many ways as possible.”Teichman said Stance will continue to develop, particularly with the aim of making it easier for congressional staffers to tally and catalog users’ concerns. Teichman also hopes that with enough people choosing to publicly tweet their audio clips, new data sets can emerge to help fact-check public officials. Related: 8 Ways To Pivot Your Business To Kickstart Growth“Politicians always say when they cast their votes that they’re just representing the will of their constituents,” he said. “This allows us to say, ‘Well, actually we have 300 of your constituents who say the opposite.’” A lesson he takes from his experience founding Stance is that in entrepreneurship it is helpful to find a previously unaddressed problem that can be solved by repurposing and modifying a tool that already exists. It’s how he got from the music collaboration idea at the heart of Ense to Stance, an idea that that allows more of the collaboration that is at the heart of representative democracy.“Everyone’s trying to do something right now,” Teichman said. “This is what we can do.”  Register Now »last_img read more