Kuru Kururu man jailed, fined $2.7M for narco trafficking

first_imgTwenty-eight-year-old Andell Solomon of Kuru Kururu, Soesdyke/Linden Highway, East Bank Demerara, was sentenced to three years in jail and was ordered to pay a .7 million fine by the Chief Magistrate Ann McLennan.Solomon was charged in April after he was caught by Police with 1000 grams of cannabis for the purpose of trafficking.On the day in question, Solomon was allegedly travelling in a public minibus, when Police stopped the bus and carried out a routineAndell Solomonsearch. During the search, Solomon was found with a blue haversack which contained the illicit drug.He openly denied the charge during his arraignment, after it was read to him by the Chief Magistrate.Before handing down her sentence, Magistrate McLennan asked Solomon if he wanted to close the case since his lone witness failed to show up and deliver his testimony. Solomon agreed to conclude the matter.He was found guilty as charged by the court, having considered evidence given by the prosecution and the fact he had knowledge of the drug in the haversack.last_img read more

GARDAI RULE OUT FOUL PLAY IN FALCARRAGH DEATH

first_imgGardai have ruled out foul play in what was thought to be the suspicious death of a man in Falcarragh.The body of the man, who was in his 60s, was found outside his home on Friday night.A pathologist examined the body yesterday and carried out a post mortem. However a Garda spokesman had now confirmed that foul play has been ruled out. GARDAI RULE OUT FOUL PLAY IN FALCARRAGH DEATH was last modified: November 3rd, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:deathFalcarraghGardailast_img read more

Bokoko literacy project brings books and libraries to Africa

first_imgBorn in Spain but of African descent, Bisila Bokoko was so moved by a trip to discover her roots that she set up the Bisila Bokoko African Literacy Project. Through it, she builds libraries, donates books to African children, and runs a scholarship fund. Bisila Bokoko’s African Literacy Project aims to have five libraries in Africa by the end of this year. (Image: Nancy Mteki from Zimbabwe Arinze Nwokolo/Zen Magazine) Melissa JavanA donation of books by a foreigner led to a Ghanaian man teaching himself how to make a windmill, put to use to provide energy for his village. This is one of the success stories of the Bisila Bokoko African Literacy Project (BBALP), which was started five years ago.That foreigner, Bisila Bokoko, met William Kamkwamba on her first visit to Ghana in 2009. She explains that Kamkwamba’s family could not afford to send him to school, prompting her to find a way to help him and others in similar situations. BBALP grew out of this desire to help.“Through the programme, he read a book about windmills. He learned of their use as an alternative and powerful energy source,” says Bokoko. “Kamkwamba was inspired to build a windmill, which later created enough electricity to power his own household and eventually his entire village.”Although she was born in Spain, Bokoko is of African descent. She says it is an amazing feeling to see how books can shape people’s lives. “Also, you realise that it takes a little bit to do much… I believe there are more young men and women like William Kamkwamba in other parts of Africa, and I would like to supply them with books that can inspire them in similar ways.”Bokoko, the executive director of the Spain-US Chamber of Commerce, has been living in the United States for about 15 years. When she eventually went back to her roots in Ghana in 2010, it was an eventful trip: she met Barima Offe Akwasi Okogyeasuo II, the chief of Kokofu, who gave her the title Queen Development Mother. “With this title, Chief Okogyeasuo II offered me a piece of land, where we decided to build the first BBALP library,” Bokoko says. Bisila Bokoko says she feels flattered to be called Queen Development Mother. (Image: Arinze Nwokolo/Zen Magazine)She laughs, saying the title does make her feel royal. “This title was a life changing experience. Due to this prestigious appointment I decided to build libraries; therefore I owe this project to the chief of Kokofu and John Hutchison [the guide who introduced her to the chief]. They gave me this honour.”Bokoko says she fell in love with Ghana and its people. “I returned from the trip with a desire to contribute, and help Africa develop and grow.”Although she saw a serious need to build infrastructure to empower people though education, health care, and medicine, she decided to supply something close to her heart: books. “Since then, I have been working to create an African literacy project, focused on building libraries around Africa. The first one was established in Kokofu, in the Kumasi Region in Ghana.”With 8 000 books already donated to people in Ghana, Bokoko says the project’s aim is to set up five libraries in Africa by the end of this year.Her campaign has grown since the first donation. There are now library projects benefiting children in Ghana, Kenya, Zimbabwe and Uganda. “We have co-operated with various schools, educational institutions and other partners to send books to Nigeria, Equatorial Guinea, Cameroon and South Africa.“We have [also] recently created the BBALP Scholarship Fund in order to help talented children get access to education in countries such as Zimbabwe, Kenya and Ghana,” she says.“Every library and every country is an adventure. Collecting the books for the children, finding the right partners, meeting the children in person, and having the opportunity to read some stories to them, is a beautiful experience all in – one that I would like to pursue in other countries with the simple goal of spreading the love for books.”Bokoko says she tries to visit the four libraries once a year. “We have some volunteer librarians visit the locations once a year.”This philanthropist says her favourite books donated to the libraries include books that children love: The Secret for Kids, Dr Seuss, and travel books.Her beautiful moments mainly involve children. “Recently in Chirumanzu in Zimbabwe, I witnessed how kids were beyond happy when we gave them books to keep at home. Some of them said: ‘This is the first thing that I have [had] in my life that is only mine!’”In a blog post carried by the American news portal, Huffington Post, Bokoko speaks of witnessing a child’s excitement when he or she receives a book as a priceless and heartwarming experience. She says the Kokofu library is a community project, a place where families and communities can practice togetherness, and emphasise their love for books. Bisila Bokoko with the children of Zimbabwe during the launch of Chirumanzu library. (Image: Nancy Mteki from Zimbabwe)She has learned a lot from the people of Ghana, Bokoko says. “I learned a gracious generosity, the impeccable desire of enjoying life to the fullest, and to be happy with whatever is in there. I also learned the power of loving each other and elegance in the way they keep tradition. Ghana stays always in my heart and has provided me with a sense of what life is really about.”Alongside her other work, Bokoko is the global ambassador and strategist for Pikolinos, the Spanish show brand. She uses this position to promote the Maasai Project, a line of shoes and bags designed in Kenya by over 3 000 Maasai women. She started work on this project in 2011, and says it has been a great experience to be able to spread the collection of Maasai-designed shoes around the world.Watch how the project to aims to improve educational opportunities:last_img read more

M-Pesa at 10: How Africa become the leader in mobile money

first_imgM-Pesa, the world’s largest mobile money network, has enabled millions of Africans to gain access to safe and secure banking solutions. The idea has become a pioneering innovation for the continent, and is now used as a model for similar systems around the world.Mobile money markets are hugely popular in Africa, offering easy, secure methods of payment and transfer of funds using simple text-based mobile technology. M-Pesa, a leader in the industry, celebrates 10 years of dominance in countries such as Kenya and Uganda. (Image: Flickr)CD AndersonLaunched by telecommunications group Vodafone/Safaricom in 2007, M-Pesa (“pesa” is Swahili for “money”) has become a way of life for 30 million Africans in 10 countries. More than 80% of Kenyans use the service. The network also enjoys market dominance in Tanzania and Uganda.The ingeniously simple method of money transfers made via cellphone messaging (SMS) has connected many to formal banking systems and enabled opportunities for small business and informal commerce, as well as played a part in helping to eradicate poverty, particularly in rural areas.The system uses simple, text-based technology available on older cellular phones. While more sophisticated mobile banking is the norm around the world, the simplicity of M-Pesa is that customers do not need bank accounts to use the network.The adoption and rise in popularity of mobile money networks in Africa has been steady. M-Pesa and its various competitor networks now not only include money transfers and other standard banking procedures, but also healthcare provision, access to international money markets and long-term lending.Tracking the growth of the mobile money market in Africa over the last 10 years. (Infographic: CNN)In 2016, according to Vodafone, M-Pesa was used in six billion transactions. Additionally, research by Digital Frontiers found a 22% drop in female-headed households living in poverty in areas with access to M-Pesa. The same study noted that the source of income for almost 200,000 women in rural areas shifted from the low-income, labour intensive agricultural sector to more prosperous small business creation. The research also showed an increase in saving and investing money through using the M-Pesa network.M-Pesa transactions are expected to surpass $1.3-billion (R17-billion) in the next three years, according to research by consulting firm Frost & Sullivan.Tracking the growth of the mobile money market in Africa over the last 10 years. (Infographic: CNN)The future of mobile money markets presents both growth opportunities and challenges. Safaricom CEO Bob Collymore told CNN that the network wanted to focus on developing a better user experience, with an eye on increasing the use of smart device technology in Africa compared to standard text-based mobile technology.As with any innovative product, a focus on developing more ground-breaking mobile financial services is also a key objective. “One of the big problems has been the relative clumsiness of using M-Pesa,” Collymore said, adding that new, simpler solutions would work hand-in-hand with better technology, such as the “tap and pay” method and EMV smart chip cards.Another focus is breaking into new markets, the rest of Africa primarily, but also increasing its presence in Asia, Eastern Europe (M-Pesa is used in Romania and Albania, which has a large informal economy, often operating without bank accounts) and the Middle East.M-Pesa was introduced in South Africa in 2010, gaining more than a million users. It aimed to conquer a market of 13 million economically active people who did not use bank accounts. However, because of stricter banking regulations in South Africa, as well as the development of more tech-savvy banking products, the system found little foothold in the country.Tracking the growth of the mobile money market in Africa over the last 10 years. (Infographic: CNN)While more and more competing mobile and smart phone banking systems are aiming to provide services for larger transactions, M-Pesa aims to keep the focus on what made it the dominant, most longstanding player in the market, namely safe, convenient micro-banking (M-Pesa does not transact anything larger than $675 (R8,000).“The banking sector across the world has always ignored the so-called base of the pyramid. We haven’t because we understand that the base of the pyramid needs to be served and there’s also commercial viability in doing that.”Source: CNN, AFKInsiderWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Desktop Wallpaper Calendars: July 2016

first_img Posted on 30th June 2016Web Design FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+share Related postsInclusive Components: Book Reviews And Accessibility Resources13th December 2019Should Your Portfolio Site Be A PWA?12th December 2019Building A CSS Layout: Live Stream With Rachel Andrew10th December 2019Struggling To Get A Handle On Traffic Surges10th December 2019How To Design Profitable Sales Funnels On Mobile6th December 2019How To Build A Real-Time Multiplayer Virtual Reality Game (Part 2)5th December 2019 Desktop Wallpaper Calendars: July 2016You are here: HomeWeb DesignDesktop Wallpaper Calendars: July 2016 To help you start into July freshly inspired, artists and designers from across the globe challenged their artistic abilities and created desktop wallpapers for you to indulge in. This monthly creativity mission has been going on for eight years now, and each month the enthusiastic work of the community brings forth interesting, beautiful, and unique results. Wallpapers that are a little more distinctive than the usual crowd.This post features their designs for July 2016. All wallpapers come in versions with and without a calendar and can be downloaded for free. A big thank-you to everyone who contributed their ideas! Now could there be a better occasion to freshen up your desktop?The post Desktop Wallpaper Calendars: July 2016 appeared first on Smashing Magazine.From our sponsors: Desktop Wallpaper Calendars: July 2016last_img read more

The Invisible Force Ruining Your Culture

first_imgThere is a force that causes businesses to produce results that are far less than the those they are capable of creating. It causes them to lose the talented employees they need, and it causes them to treat their clients and customers poorly—and in some cases, to treat them as adversaries. Like all of the most powerful forces on Earth, it is invisible to the naked eye. This force is negativity.The Only Cancer That Spreads by Contact  Negativity is the only cancer that spreads by contact. It is passed from Patient Zero, the carrier, to the people with whom they come into contact. It starts with Patient Zero complaining about “the way things are” and “the way things should be,” even though the person infected with negativity never does anything to make things better. To do something about things that might be better, you have to be a positive, optimistic, future-oriented individual with the ability to see things as better than they are and work towards that vision.Patient Zero’s complaints starts to infect susceptible Future Hosts with a seductive idea, the idea that none of the challenges or problems are the fault of Patient Zero or the Future Host. Instead, the problems are external forces working on Patient Zero and their prospective Host.The problems come from their unreasonable difficult clients, the ones that no one could serve because they are so needy, always asking for help producing the results they need. Other problems are the result of Patient Zero’s inept leadership team who is nowhere near as smart as Patient Zero. Then there are the other employees, the ones who actually believe that they do good work and make a difference for their clients. Over time, because Patient Zero continues to whisper in the ears of those who are keen to believe that nothing is their fault, there are new Hosts carrying the infection and infecting others. At some point, because the disease presses on unopposed, it runs rampant.Fighting the Infection  The advice given to boxers before a fight is apt advice here: “Protect yourself at all times.” If you are a leader, protect your culture at all times.If you don’t know who Patient Zero is, it’s likely they are right now reshaping your culture to one that is negative. If you know who Patient Zero is and have done nothing to protect yourself, your team, and your culture, their infection is likely already spreading throughout your company, making your culture something that repels good people instead of attracting them.To create a positive, optimistic, future-oriented, and empowered culture, you have to remove people who work against those ends before they destroy your culture. You have to work twice as hard on shaping a culture around beliefs and values that bring out the best in people, that provide them with a sense of agency, and that allows to do meaningful work.last_img read more

Ive never been better says Archer ahead of Ashes debut

first_imgLONDON: England fast bowler Jofra Archer says he has fully recovered from a side strain and is raring to go as he looks poised to make his test debut in the second Ashes test against Australia at Lord’s on Wednesday. Archer, who missed the first test after picking up his injury during England’s World Cup triumph last month, proved his fitness when he took six wickets and scored a century for county side Sussex’s second XI last week. The 24-year-old was included in England’s 12 in the absence of record wicket taker James Anderson, who bowled only four overs in the first test at Edgbaston before injuring his calf again. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over Chandigarh”I’m probably more ready than I have ever been. I bowled 50 overs in one game for Sussex which I think was past the overs they told me to bowl, it was good practice,” Archer told reporters. “(My fitness) has never been better. (The side strain) just needed to settle and we couldn’t get that gap in the World Cup. After that, it settled in a matter of days. “Don’t expect any miracles, I can only come in and do what I can and give my best. I can’t work miracles but I will try to.” Australia coach Justin Langer had said the key to dealing with Archer, England’s leading wicket-taker at the World Cup with 20 victims, was to “keep wearing him down” and make him bowl more spells. “I think Justin Langer has another think coming,” Barbados-born Archer added.last_img read more