Students promote awareness for Relay for Life

first_imgPurple hair extensions, purple clothing and purple desserts in the dining halls will flood campus this week to promote fundraising and awareness for the Notre Dame Relay for Life, which will take place Apr. 12 and 13. Freshman Teresa Kennedy, honorary student chairperson for Notre Dame’s Relay for Life this year, the Relay committee is hosting Purple Week 2013 through Friday to engage students in its larger mission on campus. The funds raised through Notre Dame’s Relay for Life in April will go toward cancer research at the American Cancer Society, Kennedy said. “[Purple Week] really has a dual purpose because first, all the funds raised go to the Relay and the money we collect there,” Kennedy said. “It’s also a way to get people interested in the Relay and make it interactive, since all of these events are so public and hard to ignore.” Notre Dame Relay for Life chairperson Jessica Brookshire said the committee’s 2013 fundraising goal is $175,000. One of the most visible Purple Week activities is the sale of paper cutout feet, which can be purchased at locations all over campus for $1 each. Last year, paper feet sales raised $6,082 for the Relay, Brookshire said. “It was a great fundraiser as far as dollars raised, but also [for] the awareness it brought about for the event,” Brookshire said. Marc Burdell, an Alumni Association director and this year’s honorary faculty chairperson for the Relay for Life, said the paper feet have both symbolic and monetary value for the project. “Many of the buildings on campus sell these purple feet for $1 and they’re put up all over campus to build a kind of path that leads to the Relay for Life in April,” Burdell said. “For the first time this year, students can purchase feet with Domer Dollars at the Huddle and Reckers.” Kennedy said she is looking forward to “Wear Purple” day on Thursday, when community members are encouraged to dress in purple clothes to show support for the project. “It will be interesting to see how many people there are that day who are willing to back up this cause and really get behind it,” Kennedy said. “It’s two months ahead of the Relay still, but it will be great to see the purple as a visible sign of support.” Purple is “the identifying color for [cancer] surivivors,” Kennedy said, and she can include both herself and Burdell in that category. Kennedy survived a rare form of tissue cancer and Burdell overcame a serious lymphoma diagnosis. Burdell said he thinks of his position as honorary chairperson as an opportunity to connect with others who are affected by cancer. “I was diagnosed about three and a half years ago, and before that, I was healthy,” Burdell said. “I had never even been in the hospital. I went from being unaware and unaffected to being a pretty severe cancer patient. “Now, I can talk about patient advocacy and what people can do to support each other. I find myself today leading a normal life, and as chairperson, I hope to help others understand what I’ve gone through and let them know that they can be empowered to get through it too,” Burdell said. Kennedy said she was involved with the national Relay for Life in high school and that she’s pleased to have the opportunity to participate in the Notre Dame version of the event. “I’m glad I get to share my experience about what I went through with other people here, and I hope people will be able to come to me for support if they or someone they know has cancer,” Kennedy said. “I’m an example that you can lead a totally normal life after a cancer diagnosis.” Purple hair extensions will be sold in the Coleman Morse center on Friday, and purple feet will be sold all week across campus. Notre Dame’s Relay for Life will take place from Apr. 12 to 13 at the Compton Family Ice Arena. Information about the event can be found at relay.org/NDin.last_img read more

Angels’ Andrelton Simmons wins another Gold Glove while Mike Trout misses out again

first_imgSimmons joined Omar Vizquel as the only other shortstop to win multiple Gold Gloves in each league.Three players with Orange County roots won Gold Gloves.Matt Chapman, a product of El Toro High, won his first Gold Glove, as did his former high school teammate, Colorado Rockies third baseman Nolan Arenado. Arenado won his sixth in a row.Atlanta Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman, a product of El Modena High, won his first Gold Glove, sharing the award with Chicago Cubs first baseman Anthony Rizzo. As for Trout, he had said as early in spring training that winning a Gold Glove was one of his remaining unmet goals, and he worked hard to improve his defense this year to win one. Trout did not make an error all season, and the advanced defensive metrics also showed he’d improved.With recent winners Kevin Kiermaier and Byron Buxton both missing time with injuries, it appeared to create a possibility for Trout. He was among the top three, along with Bradley and Chicago’s Adam Engel.The Gold Gloves are chosen by managers and coaches, with 25 percent of the calculation coming from the Society for American Baseball Research’s Defensive Index. The SDI combines several other defensive metrics.Trout actually finished just ahead of Bradley in the final SDI rankings, even though Bradley led him earlier in the season.Simmons won his fourth career Gold Glove award, his second with the Angels. He previously won two with the Atlanta Braves. Although this season was shaping up to be Mike Trout’s best shot to win his first Gold Glove award, he came up empty once again.Jackie Bradley Jr. of the Boston Red Sox won the American League’s Gold Glove in center field, once again frustrating Trout and Angels fans as the awards were announced on Sunday night.While Trout came up empty, shortstop Andrelton Simmons won for the fourth time, his second with the Angels. Ian Kinsler, who played with the Angels before he was traded to the Red Sox in July, also won a Gold Glove at second.Right fielder Kole Calhoun and catcher Martín Maldonado, who played most of last season with the Angels, both lost out on the awards, to Mookie Betts and Salvador Pérez, respectively.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more