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first_img– Advertisement – Heating up in Hollywood! If you’re looking to add chic new jewels to your jewelry collection or love cheese but you’re dairy-free, Us Weekly has you covered! Find out what celebrities — such as Bella Hadid and Fran Drescher — are buzzing about this week by scrolling through the photos!last_img

Is cohabitation the new marriage? Not for kids

first_imgMercatorNet 9 February 2017In the United States between 2002 and 2010 births to cohabiting couples jumped from 41 percent of all non-marital births to 58 percent. In France and Sweden one in four adults aged 18 to 49 is cohabiting, while in South America families based on non-marital “consensual unions” are a longstanding tradition. Does it matter?There is new evidence for this in a report from the Social Trends Institute and the Institute for Family Studies this week. It is based on data from 68 countries around the world, including individual data for children in the United States and 16 European countries.In an essay introducing the 2017 World Family Map, “The Cohabitation Go-Round: Cohabitation and Family Instabimfor lity Across the Globe”, Laurie DeRose and W. Bradford Wilcox report that:* Children born into cohabiting families are more likely to see their parents split by age 12 than children born into married families in almost every country.* In the United Kingdom these children are 94 percent more likely to see their parents break up by age 12.* For the United States the increased risk of a such a family “transition” is 102 percent.Of course, these figures indicate a correlation between cohabitation and unstable families, and do not prove that one causes the other. Although many of us would think it common sense that a less committed relationship would be less stable, even with – or perhaps especially with – children, other factors may be at work.Here are three alternative explanations that the World Family Map scholars studied – and found wanting:Cohabitation is less stable only because poorer people are more likely to choose it. Using the individual data for the US and Europe, WFM sorted the children in their study according to their mother’s education level (a proxy for family income) and found that cohabitation is less stable regardless of the mother’s education. “In the overwhelming majority of countries, the most educated cohabiting parents still have a far higher rate of break-up than the lowest educated married couples,” comments DeRose.In fact, DeRose and Wilcox report: “The largest absolute stability gap between children born to cohabiting vs. marital unions is among children whose mothers have high levels of education in the United States: 49 percent of children born to cohabiting couples experience parental union dissolution as compared to 18 percent of children born to married couples. At other education levels, the United States is more similar to Europe in the size of the stability gap.”As cohabitation becomes more common it becomes more similar to marriage in stability for children. Using data for 100 countries, WFM found no evidence for this. “Higher proportions of births to single women and cohabiting couples are both significantly associated with lower proportions of children living with both biological parents.” There are wide variations in the degree of this relationship, but Northern Europe was the only place where it did not hold.READ MORE: https://www.mercatornet.com/family_edge/view/is-cohabitation-the-new-marriage-not-for-kids/19329last_img read more