Temple game produces only two arrests

first_imgSaturday’s football home opener against Temple University brought more than 100,000 people to campus, and Director of Game Day Operations Mike Seamon said the day’s overall atmosphere was “absolutely elevated.” “It was definitely above what we would consider a normal standard for a typical opening day,” Seamon said. “Everything was energized … because people are excited about the season and there’s a key interest in Notre Dame football. [This weekend] was bigger than any of the home openers in the past two or three years.” Seamon said the stadium boasted a sellout crowd of approximately 82,000 people, and even more fans flooded campus Saturday for other game day events. Nearly 12,000 people attended Friday’s pep rally and about 5,000 participated in the tour of the stadium and tunnel on Friday, he said.  The number one concern for Saturday’s game was the weather forecast, Seamon said. “The weather was predicted to be very hot and humid, so we put together a big heat and humidity plan,” he said. “We put together a cooling station outside Gate A and worked with the first aid team to be sure we were prepared.  “It was a tough day weather-wise, but it could have been worse, thankfully. We had a good plan in place, and people did a good job watching out for each other so it went fairly well.” Phil Johnson, chief of police for Notre Dame Security Police, said the flow of traffic near campus on game day went smoothly despite construction. “Area police agencies worked cooperatively to promote public safety and smooth traffic flow,” Johnson said. “Everything with the new Douglas Road went very well. … Construction south of campus along South Bend Avenue didn’t adversely impact game day traffic.” Seamon said the outbound traffic was especially smooth after the game because not everybody stayed until the very end. “The game wasn’t very close, so a lot of people didn’t feel like they needed to stay until the last play,” he said. “It didn’t go down to the last minute so people left at different times, which really sped things up.” Police made two custodial arrests on campus Saturday, Johnson said. “One [arrest] was inside the stadium and one was outside,” Johnson said. “Both were arrested for public intoxication and disorderly conduct.” Seamon said another main concern was the implementation of the stadium’s new bag policy. “People were very receptive and understanding [of the policy] especially in light of the Boston Marathon tragedy,” he said. “We found that if you did not bring a bag, you got into the stadium quicker and that’s what we’d recommend in the future if you want to get in quickly.”last_img read more

Former vice president of business affairs dies

first_imgTags: Death, Notre Dame vice president, obituary, Vice President Thomas J. Mason, former Notre Dame vice president for business affairs, passed away Nov. 24 in Naples, Fla. at the age of 82, according to a University press release.“During his 20-year tenure, Mason exercised overall control of Notre Dame’s fiscal affairs and oversaw a nearly tenfold expansion of the University’s endowment, more than 30 major construction projects, the renovation of the Main Building and the expansion of Notre Dame Stadium,” the press release stated.Mason, who took the position in 1976, came to the Notre Dame after working at the University of Michigan for 10 years. In 1993, the Notre Dame Alumni Association named him an honorary alumnus, and the facilities services building on campus bears his name.“Much of higher education in recent years has been characterized by fiscal crisis and retrenchment,” University president emeritus Fr. Edward A. “Monk” Malloy said upon Mason’s retirement in 1996, according to the press release. “The fact that this has never been the case at Notre Dame is due in large measure to the financial and managerial acumen of Tom Mason. His legacy to the University is a fiscal planning and budget making model that should ensure our financial strength for years to come.”Mason earned a bachelor’s degree and a master’s of business administration from the University of Detroit in 1959 and 1963, respectively, and served in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War, according to the press release.A visitation will take place at 8:30 a.m., Saturday in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart. A funeral Mass will follow at 9:30 a.m.In lieu of flowers, the family requested that donations be made in Mason’s memory to the University of Detroit Mercy at 4001 W. McNichols Road, Detroit, MI 48221-3038; or to St. Agnes Parish, 7775 Vanderbilt Beach Road, Naples, FL 34120.last_img read more

Internationals tame the winds to set championship pace

first_img15 May 2017 Internationals tame the winds to set championship pace Internationals Aileen Greenfield and Lulu Housman set the pace on a windy first day at the English senior women’s amateur championship at South Staffordshire Golf Club. The conditions were testing, especially when combined with the slick greens, but the leaders fashioned impressive scores of two-over 75 as they set about the 36-hole process of qualifying for the match play stages.  “This is the sort of course where you have to think your way round,” said Greenfield, who was in England’s winning team at last year’s senior Home Internationals. She did that in style, with two matching halves of one-over par – thanks in part to a sure touch on the greens. “The greens are very undulating and the downhill, downwind putts are very difficult,” added Greenfield, from Pyecombe in Sussex (Image © Leaderboard Photography). She was followed in by Housman, whose score marked a return to championship form after a disappointing season last year when she missed out on a place in the England team. She played for the national side in 2015, after winning the English senior stroke play title, and her aim this week is to amass precious order of merit points to help her return to the team. Housman, from Wyke Green, Middlesex, has put in plenty of work with her coach and she remarked: “Today was a good start, but there’s a long way to go and I’ve got to keep my head screwed on!” The leaders are being chased by Suffolk’s Fiona Edmond (Ipswich), a former England women’s international who is making her debut in senior ranks and is one shot off the lead. Behind her is a group on five-over 78, made up of former champion Caroline Berry (Bromborough, Cheshire), Yorkshire’s Heather Staniforth (Hallamshire) and Devon’s Jo Shorrocks (Bigbury). The local challenge is led by South Staffordshire’s own Annette Deeley on 79, while past champion Julie Brown (Trentham) shares 12th place on eight-over. She’s in a group which includes defending champion Cath Rawthore (Sale, Cheshire) and 2015 winner Helen Lowe (Scraptoft, Leicestershire).  Shorrocks was a member of an England Golf working party which came up with a new format for this year’s tournament. It increases the championship match play flight to 32 players and introduces a second flight for the top 16 players aged over 60. “I think it’s gone down very well,” she remarked of the changes. The leading players in Flight Two – contesting the Ann Howard Trophy – are Carol Wild (Notts Ladies) and Jeannie O’Keeffe (Hankley Common, Surrey) who both shot 82 today. O’Keeffe, who putted well to initially set the target, commented: “My days of playing in the top flight are past and I’m very, very happy to have Flight Two and it’s lovely playing against my peers. It’s exciting and there’s a strong field.” Click here for full scoreslast_img read more