Tod R. Emigh age, 49

first_imgTod R. Emigh, age 49, of Brookville, Indiana died unexpectedly Thursday, June 23, 2016 at his residence.Born August 10, 1966 in Oxford, Ohio he was the son of Lewis & Lenoris M. (Canter) Emigh. He was a graduate of the former Brookville High School in Brookville, and attended Vincennes University, where he graduated with his Associates Degree. He was employed in the Telecommunications field for many years and currently worked for Cyrus One. In his leisure time he enjoyed the outdoors, hunting and fishing, and also golfing. He was a member of Emmanuel Baptist Church in Brookville, as well as the Brook Hill Golf Club.Survivors include his son, Hunter Emigh of Brookville; Hunter’s brother, Tom Wory of Bright, Indiana; his father Lewis Emigh of Brookville, Indiana; a sister, Melanie Swartz of Shelbyville, Indiana and a brother, Kim Emigh of Rowlett, Texas.He was preceded in death by his mother, Lenoris M. Emigh who died July 2, 2013 as well as a brother, Scott Robert Emigh who died March 28, 1964.Family & friends may visit from 4 until 8:00 P.M. on Monday, June 27, 2016 at Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home, 1025 Franklin Avenue, Brookville.Pastor Kevin Waltz of the Emmanuel Baptist Church will officiate the Funeral Services on Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 11:00 A.M., at Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home. Burial will be in Maple Grove Cemetery in Brookville, Indiana Memorial contributions may be directed to the Emmanuel Baptist Church or the Brook Hill Golf Club. Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home is honored to serve the Emigh, to sign the online guest book or send personal condolences please visit www.philllipsandmeyers.com .last_img read more

Zimbabwe to host Sri Lanka in two-Test series

first_imgHarare: Zimbabwe will host Sri Lanka for a two-Test series later in January. The first match of the series will begin from January 19 and the second from January 27. Both the matches will be played at the Harare Sports Club.On Tuesday, Zimbabwe Cricket announced Sean Williams as their Test captain while Chamu Chibhabha was picked to lead the national team in ODIs and T20Is on an “interim” basis.Williams has played 10 Tests in which he has scored 553 runs, including one century and two fifties. Sri Lanka are currently involved in the three-match T20I series in India in which they are 0-1 behind, having lost the second game by seven wickets.Before the India series, Sri Lanka had visited Pakistan for a historic two-Test series which they had lost 0-1. IANSAlso Read: Singapore Battled Hard to Clinch Win Over Zimbabwe in T20I Tri-Series Also Watch: United Workmen Union at Guwahati Refinery stage protest against BJP-Govt over CAA 2019last_img read more

Henry, Hardat cop top prizes at RHTY&SC cricket academy

first_imgTHE 29th annual award ceremony of the Rose Hall Town Youth & Sports Club, MS (RHTY&SC) concluded last Friday with an impressive closing ceremony at the St. Francis Training Centre.The academy, conducted by Delbert Hicks and Eon Hooper, was described as a huge success.Under-13 players Eon Henry and Trisha Hardat, copped the major awards at the closing ceremony. The impressive Henry won the Overall Player-of-the-Academy award while Hardat was named Female Player-of-the-Academy by the coaches.Club Secretary/CEO Hilbert Foster stated that the management of RHTY&SC was overwhelmed by the large registration of 105 young cricketers.The main objectives of the academy were to improve the cricketing skills of each player, to educate the players of the tradition, rules, history of the game and to get them to understand their roles of sports ambassadors.Foster, who also serves as president of Berbice Cricket Board (BCB), stated that RHTY&SC has a rich tradition of success to uphold, and as such, uses the academy each year to nurture new talents for the future and to further develop existing talents.The academy over the years has developed players like Esaun Crandon, Assad Fudadin, Royston Crandon, Abdel Fudadin, Khemraj Mahadeo, Delbert Hicks, Eon Hooper, Renwick Batson, Shawn Grant, Junior Sinclair, Kevlon Anderson, Shawn Pereira, Shemaine Campbelle, Erva Giddings, Sheneta Grimmond and Shabika Gajnabi.Assistant Secretary/CEO Simon Naidu, who served as the Director of the Academy, hailed the outstanding work of Hicks and Hooper, who both worked beyond the call of duty to make sure that every player was looked after individually. Club members Keith Hicks, Ravindranauth Kissoonlall, Tyrone Pottaya, Phil Archer and Pamie Brusch were also praised for their contribution.Each member of the academy who successfully participated received an educational package worth $2 500 while the top awardees received special prizes including bicycles, cricket gear, clocks, photo frames, caps and t/shirts.The top awardees at the academy, selected by the coaches were: Best batsman – Kamalchand Ramnarace, Best Bowler – Christopher Deroop, Best All-rounder – Xavier Henry, Best Fielder – S. Hardat, Most Disciplined – Dorasammy Mahadeo, Most Improved – Tameshwar Deonandan, Best Female – Trisha Hardat, Disciplined Junior Player – A. Batson and Cricketer-of-the-Academy – Eon Henry.last_img read more

COLUMN: Huskies’ run shows need for change

first_imgGeno Auriemma barely reacted when the buzzer sounded to signal his 100th straight victory.Behind him, a sold-out crowd decked in white T-shirts roared in support of the victory. WNBA stars Maya Moore and Breanna Stewart made their way to the court to hug their former coach. But for the Hall of Fame coach, the moment was more of a breath of relief than a milestone victory.It was, after all, just another win.UConn women’s basketball is the most dominant athletic program in the history of sports. Period. The Patriots, the Yankees, the Celtics, the Crimson Tide — they don’t even come close. No team has ever won this much and this big for this long without even flinching. We’ll probably never see it again.In their recent win-streak, the Huskies clinched 98 of those victories by double-digit margins. Of those games, 56 were won by 40 or more points.That streak extends into last season, when UConn won its fourth-straight national championship and graduated the first, second and third picks in the WNBA draft. With 11 total championship rings, Auriemma still has yet to lose an NCAA championship game.They’re the best. No one can dispute that. But as Auriemma and his Huskies continue to eviscerate the rest of the NCAA, it raises the question — is all this winning good for women’s basketball?It’s not that dominant teams are inherently bad for the game. My home team, the Kansas Jayhawks, is one of the most dominant programs in college basketball. Head coach Bill Self has more Big 12 championship rings than home losses in his 14-year tenure in Lawrence. As a fan, I’m not complaining.But that dynasty isn’t bulletproof. Just a few weeks ago, Kansas dropped a home game to an unranked Iowa State team. That is, after all, the fun of college basketball, and of any sport — anyone can win.It’s why we call it March Madness, why we sit on the edge of our seats even when the Patriots are down by a handful of touchdowns in the Super Bowl. Because it doesn’t matter how invincible Steph Curry looks when he’s taking that 30-foot jump shot — even he can lose a 3-1 lead.But when it comes to collegiate women’s sports, the competition just isn’t the same.College sports for women haven’t been around for as long. Take basketball for example — women didn’t even start playing five-on-five full court until 1971. The first NCAA women’s basketball championship took place in 1982, a full 43 years after the first men’s championship took place.Because of this, women’s sports are still growing. And amid all of the debates surrounding equal pay and equal coverage, an important issue is missed — how a smaller pool of prospects keeps talent from being equally spread.With fewer post-collegiate options for female athletes, the competition for collegiate athletics is lower. A few great teams can snap up the top talent, leaving a gaping canyon of talent between ranked and unranked squads.More than the lack of dunks or the smaller 3-point arc, this disparity in talent is what makes women’s basketball less fun to watch.So why UConn? That’s easy to answer. Auriemma was named the U.S. women’s national team head coach in 2001. Since then, he’s won 10 NCAA championships and three Olympic gold medals.The method of recruiting athletes is clear — if you want to be the best, play with the best. It’s hard to argue against the undefeated U.S. coach when defining who is the best coach in the nation. So Auriemma gets the best, year after year.That has to change. For women’s basketball to be taken seriously, for the game to grow at every level, something will have to give. And as impressive as it is, the end of the UConn dynasty will be the best thing to happen to women’s basketball.If you don’t believe me, look to NCAA women’s soccer.For decades, North Carolina stood in the same dominant shoes as UConn basketball, winning 21 national titles in the 34 years that the College Cup has existed. For the entirety of that time, Anson Dorrance served as the head coach. For the first eight years, he also served as the American head coach, just like Auriemma.North Carolina starters and alumni made up over half of the U.S. roster for almost a decade. Players went to North Carolina because they wanted to play for America, and in the process the Tar Heels created a culture of dominance.But women’s soccer has changed since then. Thanks to Mia Hamm, Abby Wambach and Alex Morgan, women’s soccer has earned more viewers, more fans and more support with each passing year. And as talent and interest continued to spread, the Tar Heels have won less and less, with new programs rising in the rankings and our own Trojans taking the title this year.It’s time for that diversity of talent to seep into women’s basketball.It’s not anything that UConn is doing wrong. They’re just recruiting the best players to the best program with the best coach and winning. A lot. It’s easy to hate the Huskies for winning, but it’s hard to fault them for continuing to succeed. But now it’s time for the playing field to begin to level in women’s basketball.For now, we can celebrate their legacy. But down the road, when that win streak is snapped and the NCAA trophy is hoisted year after year by a coach other than Auriemma — it will be a victory.The legacy of women’s basketball will be much more than a collection of dynasties. And though the Huskies might reign now, the sport will truly flourish when it becomes any woman’s game.Julia Poe is a sophomore studying print and digital journalism. She is also the sports editor of the Daily Trojan. Her column, Poe’s Perspective, runs on Wednesdays.last_img read more