Representative Cola Hudson dies at 81

first_imgRepresentative Cola Hudson, R-Lyndon, died January 20 of congestive heart failure. A farmer and janitor, he first served in the Vermont House in 1973. He served in the State House up to the week before his death. He was 81.Below are comments from the governor and Speaker of the House.Official Statement of Governor Douglas on the Death of Representative Cola HudsonI was saddened to hear of the passing of my friend, Representative Cola Hudson of Lyndon. His family, friends and community are in our thoughts and prayers.Cola and I were first elected to the Legislature in the same year, served together for five years on the House Government Operations Committee and went on to work together in a variety of areas over the next 30 years. He always worked hard and put his constituents and the State of Vermont first. He was a straight-talking, matter-of-fact gentleman with a particular interest in making government more responsive to the people. He reminded us everyday of the importance of civility and respect in our public discourse.Cola – one of the longest serving members of our House of Representatives – was a model legislator and a wonderful friend. He will be missed.Statement from the Speaker of the House Gaye Symington on the death of Representative Cola HudsonIt is with great sadness that I learned of the death of Representative Cola Hudson, the Member from Lyndonville, this past Sunday. Cola has served his community in many ways, in the Legislature continuously since 1973, as a member of the Board of the Vermont State Colleges and the Board of Trustees of Lyndon Institute, and as Chair and most recently ranking member of the House Government Operations Committee.Sitting in a booth with Representative Hudson at the Miss Lyndonville Diner one fall gave me an appreciation of the respect he holds in his community, as so many people of all ages would speak with him as they passed. I remember in particular the way he characterized his work on the Government Operations Committee, “This committee is the peoples direct voice in their state government.” Whether as Chair or ranking member, Cola’s voice carried weight because he used words judiciously and often with a sense of humor that could break tension or bring back focus to a discussion.The member from Lyndonville was rarely missing from his seat when the House was in session. He was known for using few words to convey his perspectives on the debates at hand. At times he would use his wit to remind others of the value of brevity. When the Member from Lyndonville spoke, the Vermont House listened carefully.Cola Hudson’s legislative family will miss him very much.last_img read more

England’s Adams wins Reid Trophy in play-off

first_imgFull results can be found here England’s Hugh Adams held his nerve to win the Reid Trophy on the fourth hole of a sudden death play-off at Reading Golf Club.The 13-year-old from Hagley Golf Club in Worcestershire defeated Spain’s Angel Ayora with a par and said: “It just felt great. I was just excited to lift up the trophy.“I didn’t come here expecting to win, I’m only 13 and I’ve still got another year so I was just trying to play well.”However, when he got within four shots of the lead after two rounds he was determined to go for it – and secured his place in the play-off with his three-under 67. It gave him a level par total and a tie with Ayora who closed with 66.“I tried to get off to a quick start,” he said. “I didn’t really know anything until about the 14th or 15th, but when I birdied the 16th I knew I had a chance.“Everything just started to go my way, I had a couple of nice bounces, took advantage of my luck and holed some nice putts.”Adams actually had a 10-footer on the 18th to win outright, but it slid past the hole and he was into the play-off.He’d been involved in sudden death once before and although he lost that time – on the eighth hole – the experience helped him.“I was quite relaxed, quite calm, but definitely determined,” he said.The first three play-off holes were halved in par, but on the fourth Ayora’s drive went behind a tree and his next just slipped out of bounds.Adams, who plays for his county, has been in good form this season, with high finishes at both the Midlands U16 championship and the Douglas Johns Trophy. “It’s been going well,” he said.Four other boys were in the top ten: Stuart Reis (Welwyn Garden City), Manato Nakatini (Hendon), Harley Smith (The Rayleigh Club) and Luke Perkins (Frilford Heath). Tags: Reid Trophycenter_img 9 Aug 2018 England’s Adams wins Reid Trophy in play-off last_img read more

Bonds, Clemens, Sosa on Hall ballot for first time

first_imgby Ben WalkerNEW YORK (AP)—The most polarizing Hall of Fame debate since Pete Rose will now be decided by the baseball shrine’s voters: Do Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Sammy Sosa belong in Cooperstown despite drug allegations that tainted their huge numbers? In a monthlong election sure to become a referendum on the Steroids Era, the Hall ballot was released Wednesday, and Bonds, Clemens and Sosa are on it for the first time.Bonds is the all-time home run champion with 762 and won a record seven MVP awards. Clemens took home a record seven Cy Young trophies and is ninth with 354 victories. Sosa ranks eighth on the homer chart with 609.Yet for all their HRs, RBIs and Ws, the shadow of PEDs looms large.“You could see for years that this particular ballot was going to be controversial and divisive to an unprecedented extent,” Larry Stone of The Seattle Times wrote in an email. “My hope is that some clarity begins to emerge over the Hall of Fame status of those linked to performance-enhancing drugs. But I doubt it.”More than 600 longtime members of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America will vote on the 37-player ballot. Candidates require 75 percent for induction, and the results will be announced Jan. 9.Craig Biggio, Mike Piazza and Curt Schilling also are among the 24 first-time eligibles. Jack Morris, Jeff Bagwell and Tim Raines are the top holdover candidates.If recent history is any indication, the odds are solidly stacked against Bonds, Clemens and Sosa. Mark McGwire and Rafael Palmeiro both posted Cooperstown-caliber stats, too, but drug clouds doomed them in Hall voting.Some who favor Bonds and Clemens claim the bulk of their accomplishments came before baseball got wrapped up in drug scandals. They add that PED use was so prevalent in the 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s that it’s unfair to exclude anyone because so many who-did-and-who-didn’t questions remain.Many fans on the other side say drug cheats—suspected or otherwise—should never be afforded the game’s highest individual honor.Either way, this election is baseball’s newest hot button, generating the most fervent Hall arguments since Rose. The discussion about Rose was moot, however—the game’s career hits leader agreed to a lifetime ban in 1989 after an investigation concluded he bet on games while managing the Cincinnati Reds, and that barred him from the BBWAA ballot.The BBWAA election rules allow voters to pick up to 10 candidates. As for criteria, this is the only instruction: “Voting shall be based upon the player’s record, playing ability, integrity, sportsmanship, character, and contributions to the team(s) on which the player played.”That leaves a lot of room for interpretation.Bonds, Clemens and Sosa won’t get a vote from Mike Klis of The Denver Post.“Nay on all three. I think in all three cases, their performances were artificially enhanced. Especially in the cases of Bonds and Clemens, their production went up abnormally late in their careers,” he wrote in an email.They’ll do better with Bob Dutton of The Kansas City Star.“I plan to vote for all three. I understand the steroid/PED questions surrounding each one, and I’ve wrestled with the implications,” he wrote in an email.“My view is these guys played and posted Hall of Fame-type numbers against the competition of their time. That will be my sole yardstick. If Major League Baseball took no action against a player during his career for alleged or suspected steroid/PED use, I’m not going to do so in assessing their career for the Hall of Fame,” he said.San Jose Mercury News columnist Mark Purdy will reserve judgment.“At the beginning of all this, I made up my mind I had to adopt a consistent policy on the steroid social club. So, my policy has been, with the brilliance in the way they set up the Hall of Fame vote where these guys have a 15-year window, I’m not going to vote for any of those guys until I get the best picture possible of what was happening then,” he wrote in an email.“We learn a little bit more each year. We learned a lot during the Bonds trial. We learned a lot during the Clemens trial. I don’t want to say I’m never going to vote for any of them. I want to wait until the end of their eligibility window and have my best idea of what was really going on,” he said.Clemens was acquitted this summer in federal court on six counts that he lied and obstructed Congress when he denied using performance-enhancing drugs.Bonds was found guilty in 2011 by a federal court jury on one count of obstruction of justice, ruling he gave an evasive answer in 2003 to a grand jury looking into the distribution of illegal steroids. Bonds is appealing the verdict.McGwire is 10th on the career home run list with 583, but has never received even 24 percent in his six Hall tries. Big Mac has admitted to using steroids and human growth hormone.Palmeiro is among only four players with 500 homers and 3,000 hits, yet has gotten a high of just 12.6 percent in his two years on the ballot. He drew a 10-day suspension in 2005 after a positive test for PEDs, and said the result was due to a vitamin vial given to him by teammate Miguel Tejada.Biggio topped the 3,000-hit mark—which always has been considered an automatic credential for Cooperstown—and spent his entire career with the Houston Astros.“Hopefully, the writers feel strongly that they liked what they saw, and we’ll see what happens,” Biggio said last week.Schilling was 216-146 and won three World Series championships, including his “bloody sock” performance for the Boston Red Sox in 2004.(AP Baseball Writer Janie McCauley and AP Sports Writers Arnie Stapleton and Dave Skretta contributed to this report.) ALL-TIME HOME RUN CHAMPION—In this Aug. 24, 2007 photo, San Francisco Giants’ Barry Bonds hits his 761st career home run, a solo effort, off Milwaukee Brewers pitcher Chris Capuano in the fourth inning in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File) last_img read more