Australia to bid for 2021 and 2027 World Cups

first_imgThe country last hosted a men’s tournament in 2003, where Australia lost in a thrilling extra-time to England in Sydney.World Rugby recently awarded the 2023 tournament to France, making a 2027 Southern Hemisphere host more likely, though it was initially thought any Australian bid wouldn’t come until 2031.Ireland legend Brian O’Driscoll backed Australia to host the tournament again when asked at the 2023 bid announcement last month as well.Rugby Australia chairman Cameron Clyne said bringing the competition to Australia would help ignite passion in young rugby fans.”As we edge closer to the 15th anniversary of the last Rugby World Cup played in Australia, regarded by many as the greatest in the tournament’s history, we are excited to confirm that Rugby Australia will bid for the hosting rights for the Women’s Rugby World Cup in 2021 and the 2027 (Men’s) Rugby World Cup,” he said. “The Rugby World Cup is the pinnacle for our Qantas Wallabies and Buildcorp Wallaroos teams and we want to bring those tournaments home for any player, boy or girl, man or woman, who ever dreamed of lifting the Cup here on our home soil.”The renovation of ANZ Stadium and Allianz Stadium would appear crucial in any Australian World Cup bid, with ANZ the host for the 2003 Rugby World Cup final, and both renovations are slated to be well complete by 2027.The news comes off the back of the announcement earlier on Wednesday about the launch of a Super W competition. Wallaroos captain Shannon Parry said Australia would be a brilliant host for the World Cup.“I have played in three Women’s Rugby World Cups and I know that we would be amazing hosts for the tournament. Australians love putting on a sporting show when we host major tournaments and events and it would be huge to bring the pinnacle of women’s XVs rugby to our shores.”The move to bid for the women’s World Cup is believed to be part of the motivation for launching the new tournament, to show Australia’s depth of talent and ability to nurture women’s rugby.There were whispers earlier this year that Australia would consider bidding for the next women’s international tournament, with Rugby Australia chairman Cameron Clyne open-minded about the move, when asked by RUGBY.com.au in October.It seems likely Australia would follow the strategy of Ireland in any World Cup staging, potentially using universities and smaller, boutique grounds to host matches, something that worked well in Ireland, with plenty of sold-out games.Pulver said he hoped the announcement would show a commitment to developing women’s rugby in Australia.“Bidding for the Women’s Rugby World Cup I hope signifies to the community how serious we are about making Rugby a game for all and growing female participation,” he said.”If we are successful with our bid, it will have an immediate and significant impact on women’s rugby.”“The Australian rugby community has been incredibly proud of the growth of the women’s game in recent times and I know that this crucial competition is going to supercharge this growth in future years.”last_img read more

QLD tourisms bounce back

first_imgResilient Queenslanders during cyclone Yasi Source = e-Travel Blackboard: K.W A year on from Queensland’s devastating floods and cyclone Yasi, tourism is bouncing back in the sunshine state as operators are resilient in improving their business to attract visitors in greater numbers.According to Australian Bureau of Statistics results, growing tourist numbers point towards a positive future with an increased occupancy rate and average length of stay.  This in part comes from the success of Tourism Queensland’s $12 million Nothing Beats Queensland campaign that was released immediately after the summer’s disasters.Far North Queensland, the worst hit area from the cyclone, has reported solid bookings for many accommodation houses over the Christmas and New Year holiday period.Mantra, one of the biggest operators of hotels in Queensland, reported a rise in occupancy rates of up to 10 per cent in North Queensland, 8 per cent on the Sunshine Coast and 4 per cent on the Gold Coast.Tourism Minister Jan Jarratt paid tribute to Queensland’s tourism operators for their resilience and determination and said while the future looks positive there was still a lot of work to be done.Far North’s tourism recovery officer Richard Blanchette, who was appointed to work with operators as they rebuild after Yasi, identifying issues and helping businesses bounce back, will remain in the position until Easter due to extra funding.Mr Blanchette acknowledged the strength of people in the region as they use the experience of the cyclone to “adapt and expand”.”We need to acknowledge just how far we have come and what we have achieved instead of solely focusing on what there is left to do,” Mr Blanchette said.last_img read more