Police disrupt climate protest in Mumbai, with a warning note on Aarey

first_imgBarely 20 minutes after protesters gathered at Bandra Reclamation on Sunday morning, demanding that the government declare a climate emergency, the police dispersed them. Many claimed that the police warned them that they could not to talk about the Aarey issue. Organised by a volunteer-led group called Extinction Rebellion (XR), the agitators, including schoolchildren and college students, planned a mock die-in. Following the disruption, they shifted their venue to a nearby parking lot.XR has been in the news for its protests across the world. Last week, the group gathered in London spilling red paint to resemble blood, and raised a sign that read ‘stop funding climate death’.In Mumbai, the group planned a more subtle protest with participants lying down as dead. “Policemen were already present before we reached the venue. We showed them our permission letters but they said no gathering would be allowed as Section 144 was in force,” an XR volunteer told The Hindu, adding the policemen also told them that they could not talk about or discuss the Aarey issue. “We had a few students from Tata Institute of Social Sciences who had come down to talk about Aarey but they had to go back due to the police diktat,” he said.The group had initially planned to march to Aarey colony following the Bandra protest. But they had to cancel it in view of the police action against the protesters who assembled at Aarey. “We did not want to risk the safety of the people,” the volunteer said.He also said they will approach the Mayor to demand a declaration of climate crisis in Mumbai. The group has planned similar events in other cities.A press statement from XR said they are a group standing up for Indian assets that matter to all Indians first, and specifically Mumbaikars – forests, rivers, wetlands, oceans, humans, and animals. “It’s quite shocking to see authorities intervene and be present widely for a planned event on climate change.”last_img read more

What, them worry? Warriors confident despite NBA Finals hole

first_imgView comments Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting MOST READ Serena Williams bids early adieu at French Open, like Naomi Osaka before her Two-day strike in Bicol fails to cripple transport Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES PDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Catholic schools seek legislated pay hike, too No problem, they figure.“It’s first to four, not first to one,” Klay Thompson said. “So, still a lot of basketball to be played.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsThe Warriors’ 1-0 deficit may be unusual, but they certainly don’t seem uncomfortable. Golden State had won 12 straight Game 1s before falling 118-109 on Thursday, and the two-time defending champions hadn’t been behind in the NBA Finals since Cleveland had a 2-1 lead in 2015.Golden State coach Steve Kerr has pointed to his team’s poor transition defense in the opener after Toronto used its quickness to score 24 fast-break points and turn the Warriors’ 17 turnovers into 17 points. ‘Rebel attack’ no cause for concern-PNP, AFP The Warriors started Jordan Bell at center in Game 1 and Kerr thought he did well, but Golden State has other options. DeMarcus Cousins and Andrew Bogut are also in the center rotation along with Kevon Looney.“Every game is going to be different,” Kerr said. “Pretty much every game this postseason has been different at the center position, based on what we have needed. The one constant is Looney, who is going to play his 28, 30 minutes one way or the other. What we’re always trying to do is mix and match, and find matchups and fill in those gaps with the right combinations that can help us win.”WATCH YOUR MOUTHThe Los Angeles Clippers were fined $50,000 by the NBA on Friday for comments coach Doc Rivers made about Leonard during a TV appearance. Kerr won’t fall into the same predicament, having gotten in trouble before.“I got fined when I was the GM of Phoenix for making a joke on ‘The Dan Patrick Show.’” Kerr said. “I think he asked me if we were interested in LeBron when LeBron was a free agent back in whatever it was that he went to Miami. I said if he’s willing to take the minimum, we would take him. Dan laughed. And I wrote a $10,000 check the next day. So I learned my lesson. I don’t comment about any other players”.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “They were getting the ball off the rim and just pushing it. Instead of crashing as hard as we did, we’ll have to make the adjustment in Game 2 and try to send more guys back,” Thompson said Saturday. “But 10 days off as well, we might have had a little cobwebs. It was just a mixture of things. But I know this: I know we’ll be better tomorrow.”Kerr said the Raptors reminded him of the Warriors, with Pascal Siakam pushing the ball in transition the way Draymond Green does. Siakam was the far more effective player in the opener, with 32 points while Green struggled to a 2-for-9 night.But the Warriors aren’t worried, relying on the confidence from facing just about every possible situation while making it to five straight NBA Finals.“They got rings and they can be confident,” Raptors guard Kyle Lowry said. “We can’t really necessarily worry about them. We have to continue to worry about us. They’re going to be them and they’re going to do their thing, but for us we have to concentrate on us and focus on what we have to do.”Things to know going into Game 2:ADVERTISEMENT Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr listens during a basketball press conference at the NBA Finals in Toronto, Saturday, June 1, 2019. (Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press via AP)TORONTO — The Toronto Raptors are rugged and relentless, capable of punishing teams in transition any time they make a mistake.The Golden State Warriors felt like they were seeing a version of themselves in Game 1 of the NBA Finals, and now they have to stop it.ADVERTISEMENT Kevin Durant out with Achilles injury; to undergo MRI on Tuesday PLAY LIST 03:12Kevin Durant out with Achilles injury; to undergo MRI on Tuesday01:43Who are Filipinos rooting for in the NBA Finals?01:48NBA: Kawhi, George seek more for Clippers than beating Lakers02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue BETTER LEONARD?Kawhi Leonard scored 23 points in the opener but shot just 5 for 14 after averaging 31.2 points in the first three rounds. Coach Nick Nurse doesn’t think the All-Star forward was bothered by a leg injury that appeared to hamper him somewhat in the Eastern Conference finals.“I don’t think the leg trouble is much of an issue,” Nurse said, “and I’m expecting him to play a lot better tomorrow.”TALKING TRASHIf the Warriors want to rattle Leonard, it will require actions rather than words. The 2014 NBA Finals MVP always appears to be calm, and he was asked if he responds when players try to trash talk him.“It really doesn’t happen too much,” Leonard said. “I really can’t say it happens.”KD’s OKThough Kevin Durant remains out at least one more game with a strained right calf, he traveled to Toronto with the Warriors to work with the training staff. Stephen Curry said his presence around the locker room is helpful until the two-time NBA Finals MVP can get back on the floor.“Anybody who goes through an injury like that, you kind of feel alienated because your schedule is a little different. Most of the time you’re on kind of (isolation) with our athletic training staff, putting extra hours in. Stuff starts to feel monotonous, especially with the big stage of the finals here and now,” Curry said. “So I think he’s handled that well, understanding his time is coming sooner than later and he’s doing whatever he can on a daily basis to get healthy.”MAN IN THE MIDDLElast_img read more

Photographer files complaint with police after alleged assault while on the job

first_imgTORONTO – A Toronto newspaper photographer said he opted to file a complaint with police about being attacked while covering a protest in order to raise awareness about the dangers of escalating anti-media sentiment.Longtime Toronto Sun staff photographer Stan Behal said what he experienced last weekend — which included being hit on the head — was different from other incidents over his 35-year career, alleging it appeared to be fuelled by animosity toward journalists.The occurrence, coupled with increasing anti-media rhetoric from south of the border, made him feel the need to put the matter before police, he said.“The public is getting the message that you can get away with this, especially when someone as high-profile as the President of the United States says that we’re the ‘enemy of the people,’” Behal said. “That’s scary. That really makes what we do very difficult.”Toronto police said in a news release Thursday they were looking for the public’s help in identifying the suspect in an alleged assault on a 63-year-old man in the city’s downtown last Saturday. A police spokeswoman confirmed the victim of the alleged incident was Behal. Police said the suspect is a man in his 20s, with a muscular build and short brown hair. He was wearing a grey T-shirt at the time.Behal said the incident took place while he was covering an anti-hate rally in downtown Toronto on Saturday.A coalition of religious, labour and social justice groups had convened to counteract a planned demonstration by the Worldwide Coalition Against Islam, which is open about its anti-Muslim and white supremacist agenda. That group ultimately did not go through with its rally but those against it gathered nonetheless.Behal said that while many espoused messages of tolerance, a specific contingent made him feel targeted as he accompanied a Toronto Sun columnist and snapped photos of the event.Those individuals, who covered their faces with bandannas, followed, photographed and challenged him as he tried to complete his assignment, he said.Suddenly, a man whose face was not covered lunged at him, Behal said.A video posted on the Sun’s website shows a man rush up to Behal, swat at his head, grab his arm and eventually yank off his cap. Several people, including police, look on as the incident takes place.“I think he meant to do damage,” Behal said. “It looks like he’s just swiping to try and get my hat, but his hand comes down pretty strongly on the top of my head … It was quite painful.”Groups organizing or endorsing the rally criticized what happened, saying it undermined the purpose of the event.United Jewish People’s Order spokeswoman Lia Tarachansky, one of the event organizers, apologized to Behal for his ordeal and said no one should ever feel unsafe at an event denouncing hatred.“We did not go there to be violent, but to unite Toronto against hate groups,” she said.Evan Balgord, executive director of the Canadian Anti-Hate Network, said hat-grabbing has become a feature of some protests and typically involves people removing the “Make America Great Again” caps that have become prevalent since Donald Trump launched his successful bid for the U.S. presidency.But Balgord said disrupting journalists in the course of their duties crosses the line.“The guy who did this should not have done this,” he said. “You do not lay hands on journalists at demonstrations.”At least one industry group said Behal’s experience raises alarms about the treatment of journalists in society at large.“In an era where epithets like ‘fake news’ are undermining the integrity of journalists around the world, we are seeing real, tangible effects of a concerted effort to establish distrust between the public and the press,” Cole Burston, the president of the News Photographers Association of Canada said in a statement.“The incident with Mr. Behal underscores the growing challenge our colleagues face in simply doing their jobs, and that’s not acceptable.”last_img read more