HAIL THE BRAVE SURFERS OF DUNFANAGHY!

first_imgThe brave pair get ready for their surf.There may have been hailstones on the beach in Dunfanaghy but that didn’t stop these brave surfers fro catching some waves.Up and awayvvvvve!The pair had to walk over the freezing balls of ice before taking to their boards in the freezing waters off Donegal.Luckily they had what looks like two very warm hooded wetsuits. But we can’t help thinking a nice armchair before a roaring fire would have been warmer!Many thanks to Paul McGlinchey for the pictures.The hailstones which came on the beach at Dunfanaghy.HAIL THE BRAVE SURFERS OF DUNFANAGHY! was last modified: January 17th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalDunfanaghyhailstonessurferswaveslast_img read more

The Politics of Darwinism: Dictate, Slander, Block

first_imgIn a state of panic over the rise of intelligent design and creationism, most scientific societies supporting Darwinism are doing what their opponents feel is doomed to fail: avoiding, at all costs, a fair and intellectual debate about the evidence.  Instead, many pro-Darwin forces issue prepared statements, misrepresent their opponents, and use legal maneuvering to try to head them off at the pass.    What they cannot ignore, however, is that large majorities in the public sector oppose the Darwin-only policy in education.  That means the public also has become a target of abuse.  This was obvious 17 months ago with the notorious National Geographic Nov. 2004 cover story, “Was Darwin Wrong?” answered inside with a paternal foot-stomp in bold 250-point type, NO (see 10/24/2004, 02/15/2005).  Here are some recent examples in that same tactical style that treats the majority public as hopelessly backward peasants who, in this state of siege, need stern military discipline:Royal Edict:  The Royal Society announced in a press release an official “statement on evolution, creationism and intelligent design.”  The upshot: evolution is well-established and an essential part of science education; criticism of evolution is criticism of science; you can believe in a creator as long as you don’t call it science; bacterial resistance demonstrates evolution; creationism is religion and intelligent design is disguised creationism; debate is good in science but undermining students’ confidence in science by distorting evidence is not (and that is what creationists do, by implication); and evolution is an essential part of the rise of a scientific understanding of the world, whereas anything else is based on faith.  (No new weapons, in other words; just more of the same from the NCSE armory.)Hear Ye, Hear Ye:  In addition, the Royal Society published a podcast from Professor Steve Jones.  Its title left no room for doubt about the contents: “Why Creationism is Wrong and Evolution is Right.”  Prime arguments: (1) science is about disbelief, but religion is about faith; (2) while it is true that a majority in the public distrusts evolution, why do no biologists agree? and, oddly, (3) “creationism does more harm to religion than it does to science.”    Randy Boswell reported on these two Royal Society statements on Canada.com, titling his article, “Academic Worry Grows Over ‘Intelligent Design.’”Sound the Alarm:  In another of a series of anti-ID attack pieces with not an inch granted the opposition, PLoS Biology warned about “Scientific Illiteracy and the Partisan Takeover of Biology.”  Liza Gross associated intelligent design with doubts about stem cell research, doubts about global warming, and doubts about science in general.  Her equation is simple: intelligent design = scientific illiteracy.  Reporting the thoughts and advise of John D. Miller, she quoted his advice: “Scientists need to become involved in partisan politics and to oppose candidates who reject evolution or attack scientific research” – implying that the two go hand in hand.  No intelligent design supporter was given two words, but NCSE Director Eugenie Scott got a big sidebar, complete with big, smiling picture of her.  The end of Liza Gross’ article included the obligatory disclaimer, “The author has declared that no competing interests exist.”Hold Your Fire: A Parley!  A conservative group at Cornell, Sounding the Trumpet, announced rather joyfully that Cornell is going to offer a class on intelligent design this summer.  World Net Daily seemed to share this optimistic news, and so did the campus IDEA club.  William Dembski, however, interviewed by Agape Press, sees a Trojan Horse.  The teacher, Allen MacNeill, once called Dembski a “bald-faced liar,” and Cornell president Hunter Rawlings sternly denounced ID last year (see ARN reprint of IDEA Club response).  Dembski is certain the class will have a strong pro-Darwinist bias.  His take on Cornell’s strategy: “the academic mainstream … is hunkering down, stonewalling, [and] wanting to say there’s nothing of merit here, we’ve got to shut this down – and if we’re going to teach a course on it, it’s purely to debunk it.”And, In This Corner… ?:  Evolution News is waiting for Science magazine to let Michael Behe respond, since last week’s claim that “irreducible complexity” had a Darwinian explanation (04/06/2006) effectively admitted that the concept was scientific.  They seem to know that it will be a long wait.  For the expected silence, Discovery Institute provided a stack of reading material on the irreducible complexity argument.Pre-Emptive Strike:  Remember Frazier Mountain High School?  the little rural school with its little elective “Philosophy of Design” class that earned international attention when sued and forced to recant? (see 01/25/2006 story).  Well, now that a local church is planning to rent the town hall this Sunday and show the film Icons of Evolution, the Mountain Enterprise local newspaper published a three-page, multifaceted attack on intelligent design, discounting the credibility of the teacher highlighted in the film and the Darwinism-discrediting facts presented by Dr. Jonathan Wells.  In a semblance of balanced reporting, they have also kept a list of their running news stories on the episode, mostly overtly or covertly biased against intelligent design (such as posting teacher Sharon Lemburg’s initial outline for her elective course, which was never approved or even voted on, and had no bearing on the class).  Whether this pre-emptive strike will accomplish the desired result in this largely religious and conservative community remains to be seen.Wind Talkers:  Alan Leshner is so keen on the war correspondence, he must be hearing things.  According to Evolution News, he heard “code language” when Oklahoma proposed criticisms of Darwinism in a new Academic Freedom Act.  To the president of the AAAS, “exposing students to all sides of the scientific debate about evolution” is really “code language” for promoting a “narrow religious agenda.”  A blog by Lawrence Selden responds in plain English.Quarantine the ID Flu:  A press release from the Hunter Valley, NZ Scoop warned that 2,800 Australian students are at risk of being infected with the ID that is “infiltrating” science classes.  An education spokesperson “called on federal and state education ministers to withhold public funding until these schools agreed to quarantine science teaching from religious dogma.”  Unless students are “isolated” from this “myth,” there will be appalling consequences: “They are at risk of becoming unemployable in many important areas of the economy where scientific method is essential.”Battle Tactics Unveiled:  Writing in American Enterprise, Joe Manzari and Seth Cooper discussed the tactics of the ACLU to intimidate school boards with lawsuits.For the most part, critics of Darwinism and proponents of intelligent design have had to use the non-mainstream media to get their message out.  Some recent salvos:Jews for ID:  David Klinghoffer wrote an ID-friendly article for Jews in the Jerusalem Post.Getting the Darwinists’ Goat:  Ted Byfield gave his thoughts on “Rebutting Darwinists” in two editorials on World Net Daily.Truth or Talk:  True.origin tries to keep a running set of scientific responses to Talk.Origins, one of the pro-Darwinist blogs often cited as authoritative by evolutionists.Lone Rangers:  Individuals can always write letters to the editor (if they will print them).  Here’s one by Jonathan Bartlett printed by Tulsa Today answering Alan Leshner’s attacks against the Oklahoma bill.Some Isolated Fair Fights:  ID the Future keeps tabs on the isolated instances of open debates between evolutionists and ID proponents.Bias and Anti-Bias:  When the mainstream media won’t retract their misrepresentations, Evolution News does it for them.How will this all turn out?  Nobody knows, but the lines are clearly drawn.  The tactics of both parties sometimes reveal more than the statements themselves.One of the most intriguing, dynamic and fateful cultural debates in recent history is taking place before our eyes.  No one can afford to be uninformed.    The Darwinists are attempting to corral all non-materialists into a funny farm labeled “faith” and deny them any voice in matters of science, truth, reality or history, while their opposition are calling their bluff and demanding accountability for 150 years of misdirection and deceit.  Who’s right?  Well, look at the Darwin Party’s behavior.  If their case were so strong, they could state it before a crowd of educated, reasonable people, and easily trounce their opponents.  Since they cannot, and have failed to do so for over a century, all they can do is shore up their castle walls with the same recycled fluff, surround it with a moat of fear tactics, catapult out media bombs of misrepresentations, drug the populace with hallucinations, and desperately cry for reinforcements from the ACLU secret police.  Inside the castle, where the undecided can’t see the enemy, they decorate King Charles’s coffin, as he lies in state, telling the peasants that here lies the Great Leader Who Saved Science.  Now, what does this tell you?    If you need responses to Steve Jones and the other Royalist propaganda, well, keep reading, and reading, and reading.  We’ve got over five years of antidotes, and unlike the Darwinist Press, you get to hear the very best on both sides make their case.  The next article is a good place to start.(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Vapor Diffusion Ports

first_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberscenter_img Cathedral ceiling assemblies and unvented conditioned attics often suffer from problems with damp roof sheathing. For years, building scientists have been proposing a variety of solutions to these damp sheathing problems. One possible solution (at least in hot climates) is to abandon the practice of installing ventilation baffles under roof sheathing, and instead to promote a new kind of ridge vent called a vapor diffusion port.A vapor diffusion port — also known as a vapor diffusion vent, a diffusion vent, or a vapor vent — is located at the ridge of a gable roof or at the hips of a hipped roof. In some ways, a vapor diffusion port resembles a ridge vent. Like a ridge vent, a vapor diffusion port requires the roof sheathing to be cut back for several inches on both sides of the ridge. Unlike a ridge vent, however, a vapor diffusion port is airtight.After creating open slots near the ridge — by either stopping the roof sheathing short of the ridge, or by cutting back the roof sheathing where necessary — workers cover the open slots with a vapor-permeable material like vapor-permeable roofing underlayment or gypsum-based sheathing. This vapor-permeable material is taped to the OSB sheathing on all sides, ensuring an airtight installation. Finally, the vapor diffusion port is protected by conventional ridge vent flashing.Attics and cathedral ceiling assemblies with vapor diffusion ports don’t need soffit vents. In fact, if you are retrofitting vapor diffusion ports into an older house, you have to seal the soffit vents carefully. The aim is to create a relatively airtight attic.Here’s the theory behind vapor diffusion ports: moisture in attics or cathedral ceiling rafter bays tends to concentrate near the ridge. Whenever the outdoor air is less damp than the air at the top of the attic, a… last_img read more

Nadal surprised as ‘super solid’ Djokovic exits Monte Carlo

first_imgDA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Top-ranked Djokovic, who has won the tournament twice, earlier lost 6-3, 4-6, 6-2 to 10th-seeded Daniil Medvedev and produced 47 unforced errors.Djokovic out, Nadal in trouble. It seemed — briefly, at least — that the day might produce two straight upsets.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hosting SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte “He’s able to win against everybody when he’s playing well,” said Nadal, who may need to go up a level.Nadal imperiously won the title last year without conceding more than four games in a set, but Pella caused him considerable problems and forced 13 break-point chances on Nadal’s serve.Although Nadal leveled the first set at 5-5, he dropped his serve again. It gave Pella the chance to become the first player to take a set against him here since Britain’s Kyle Edmund in the second round two years ago.Pella reached 30-30 but Nadal broke back and forced a tiebreaker — his first here since a third-round win against John Isner in 2015.A jittery looking Nadal was broken to love serving for the match. Pella could not hold his serve, either.He saved one match point at 15-40 down but then double-faulted. After 2 hours, 20 minutes on court, a relieved Nadal hugged his opponent at the net.The last time Nadal failed to reach the last four here was in 2014, when he lost to countryman David Ferrer in the last eight.Earlier, Medvedev was appearing in the last eight of a Masters tournament for the first time but Djokovic struggled more in the windy conditions.He double-faulted at 30-30 to give Medvedev his first match point and a backhand winner secured a first win against Djokovic at the fourth attempt.“He played worse than before and I am gaining more experience,” said the 14th-ranked Medvedev, who is chasing a fifth career title. The 23-year-old Russian next faces unseeded Dusan Lajovic, who also reached a Masters semifinal for the first time when he beat Italian qualifier Lorenzo Sonego 6-4, 7-5.One Serb can make Sunday’s final, but it’s Lajovic and not the one people expected.When Djokovic won the Australian Open this year he secured a third straight Grand Slam title and 15th overall, and in doing so he moved two behind Nadal and five adrift of Roger Federer’s record haul of 20.Since then, his form has wilted.Djokovic has failed to reach the last four in three straight tournaments, having fallen short at Indian Wells and Miami.But his focus is bigger and it’s further down the line: taking Nadal’s crown at Roland Garros.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “That game was decisive, and I was lucky to win that one. After that, the match changed a lot,” Nadal said. “Losing the first three games was tough but I found a way at the right time. Sometimes these matches help for rhythm because you suffer.”Before going onto court for his quarterfinal, Nadal spent some time watching Djokovic. Even 17-time Grand Slam winner Nadal, who has lost 28 times in 53 contests against the toughest rival of his career, was surprised.“Always, when Novak loses, (it) seems strange because he’s super solid,” Nadal said. “But everybody is human.”Nadal next faces No. 13 Fabio Fognini, who beat No. 9 Borna Coric of Croatia 1-6, 6-3, 6-2.Fognini has lost 11 of 14 matches against Nadal, but two of the Italian’s three wins were on clay. All the wins were in 2015, including a thriller in the third round of the U.S. Open, when Fognini rallied from two sets down.ADVERTISEMENT Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue Spain’s Rafael Nadal grimaces as he defeats Argentina’s Guido Pella during their quarterfinal match of the Monte Carlo Tennis Masters tournament in Monaco, Friday, April 19, 2019. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)MONACO— Surprised at seeing rival Novak Djokovic go out of the Monte Carlo Masters after an error-strewn performance, defending champion Rafael Nadal acknowledged he enjoyed some luck in reaching the semifinals on Friday.Quite an admission from the best player in clay-court history, who has won both this tournament and the French Open a record 11 times. But Nadal struggled against fellow left-hander Guido Pella, losing his first three service games to trail 4-1 before recovering to beat the unseeded Argentine 7-6 (1), 6-3.ADVERTISEMENT View comments SPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsEspecially when Pella served for 5-1.But he double-faulted, giving the second-ranked Nadal an unexpected reprieve which he took full advantage of.center_img Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles After hot start, Pasig Chooks bows out of 2019 FIBA 3X3 World Masters Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid Philippine Arena Interchange inaugurated LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READlast_img read more

Senator Drilling plan carveout for Florida may be illegal

first_imgWASHINGTON – The Trump administration may have violated federal law by exempting Florida from a national plan to expand offshore drilling, a Democratic senator charged Thursday.Sen. Maria Cantwell of Washington state said Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s decision to give Florida a last-minute exemption while ignoring at least 10 other states that made similar requests may violate requirements of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, which governs drilling in U.S. coastal waters.Zinke’s action is especially outrageous because Florida — unlike California, Washington and other states — did not expressly oppose the drilling proposal in written comments submitted to the Interior Department, Cantwell said.While Florida Gov. Rick Scott voiced opposition soon after the plan’s Jan. 4 release, a letter submitted by the state Department of Environmental Protection last year did not oppose the drilling plan or ask for Florida to be exempted. Instead, the letter warned about the effects of oil and gas activities on the environment and urged that “long-term protection of Florida’s sensitive coastal and marine resources should be of paramount concern” in developing a drilling plan.By contrast, the governors of California, Oregon and Washington told Interior they “strongly oppose any new leasing” off their coasts and asked to be removed from the plan.By exempting Florida but not other states, Zinke showed he is “more concerned with politics than proper process when it comes to making key decisions that affect our coastal communities,” said Cantwell, the top Democrat on the Senate Energy Committee.Carl Tobias, a law professor at the University of Richmond, called Zinke’s action troubling. Singling out one state for exemption “may well violate federal law” that requires formal notice and comment period before taking regulatory action, he said.An Interior spokeswoman declined to comment Thursday. But White House press secretary Sarah Sanders denied the administration gave special treatment to Scott, a Republican and ally of President Donald Trump who is considered a likely Senate candidate later this year.“I’m not aware of any political favour that that (Florida exemption) would have been part of, so, no,” Sanders said.In announcing the exemption for Florida on Tuesday, Zinke called Scott “a straightforward leader that can be trusted.”Zinke added that he supports Scott’s position that “Florida is unique and its coasts are heavily reliant on tourism as an economic driver. As a result of discussion with Governor Scott and his leadership, I am removing Florida from consideration for any new oil and gas platforms.”Rep. Ted Lieu, D-Calif., said Zinke’s action “violates the legal standard of arbitrary and capricious agency action.”Like Florida, California and other coastal states “rely on our beautiful coasts for tourism and our economy,” Lieu said, adding that he believes courts will strike down the drilling plan.The American Petroleum Institute, the top oil and gas lobbying group, also questioned Zinke’s action — but from the other direction. The group called the Florida withdrawal “premature” and said restricting access to the Eastern Gulf of Mexico in particular “puts hundreds of thousands of jobs at risk across the country and along the Gulf Coast.”API spokesman Reid Porter said the Trump administration “should follow the established process” for developing an offshore drilling program, including public comment. “It is important that Interior complies with all the legal procedures and requirements for putting together” a drilling program on the Outer Continental Shelf, Porter said.Questions about the legality of the Zinke’s decision came as bipartisan opposition to the drilling plan mounted. Several governors, including leaders of Washington state, Delaware, Rhode Island and Maryland, asked for their states to be withdrawn from the plan and requested meetings with Zinke.A spokeswoman for Zinke said he spoke with South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster on Thursday and expects to speak Friday with North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper and California Gov. Jerry Brown.Democrats from coastal states accuse Zinke and Trump of punishing states with Democratic leaders while rewarding Republicans.Zinke announced plans last week to greatly expand offshore oil drilling from the Atlantic to the Arctic and Pacific oceans, including more than a dozen states where drilling is now blocked. The five-year plan would open 90 per cent of the nation’s offshore reserves to development by private companies.Industry groups praised the announcement, while environmental groups denounced the plan, saying it would harm America’s oceans, coastal economies, public health and marine life.last_img read more

ChandigarhDibrugarh Express trains engine catches fire 2 killed

first_imgGuwahati/Jalpaiguri: Two passengers of the Chandigarh-Dibrugarh Express died on Friday after they jumped out of the moving train between the Chaterhat and Nijbari section in West Bengal when they saw smoke emanating from the locomotive’s engine, said Railway sources.The guard of a passing goods train saw smoke and flame coming out of the rear engine of the express train in the afternoon and reported it to its driver, sources said. As panic spread among the passengers, two of them jumped out and died of injuries, officials said. Fire brigade personnel rushed to the spot and extinguished the flames, sources said, adding another engine was attached to the train, which then proceeded to Chaterhat. Prima facie it is appears the fuel tank of the rear engine had fallen off, got dragged along the track and caught fire, sources said. The main line on the route under Barsoi-New Jalpaiguri section of North East Frontier Railway was blocked due to the incident. A probe into the incident is being conducted by the Railway authorities.last_img read more

Penalty kicks spark doom Ohio State mens soccer

Senior defender Kyle Culbertson (3) attempts a penalty kick during a game against Indiana on Oct. 12 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU lost, 2-1, as Culbertson made one penalty kick, but missed another in the game’s closing minutes.Credit: Ed Momot / For The LanternFacing a top-10 opponent, the Ohio State men’s soccer team’s goalscoring on Sunday afternoon lived by a penalty kick — and ultimately died with a penalty kick.The Buckeyes (4-5-3, 2-2-0) played a tight game throughout the 90 minutes against the No. 10 Indiana Hoosiers (8-1-3, 2-1-1), but were ultimately unable to match the play of their opponent, falling at home, 2-1.A penalty kick by junior defender Kyle Culbertson — his second try of the day following a successful one — was knocked away with just over a minute remaining to seal the Indiana victory.“I’m heartbroken for the guys right now, because although there were stretches of the game where we made some bad mistakes and hurt ourselves, we played well enough to win the game and I think deserved to win the game,” OSU coach John Bluem said.The Hoosiers broke a 1-1 tie in the 78th minute with a goal by freshman forward/midfielder Jay McIntosh. Heavy pressure in front of the net allowed McIntosh to take a pass and knock it into the far-right post, where it ricocheted into the net.McIntosh’s goal — the first of his collegiate career — came less than 50 seconds after the Buckeyes had tied the game.An Indiana defender attempted to clear out the ball in front of his goalkeeper, but did so with his hand, granting the Buckeyes a penalty kick. The kick was taken by Culbertson, who rolled a shot to the left side of the net while Indiana sophomore goalkeeper Colin Webb dove to the right.The goal was Culbertson’s second of the season, and seemed to turn around the momentum of the game until McIntosh’s strike seconds later.“Their quality combined with the amount of effort we put in during the first 25 or 30 minutes, maybe we got a little bit tired,” junior midfielder Zach Mason said. “But I think it’s just something where we had moments, and they had moments, and unfortunately they took better advantage of their moments.”With just more than a minute remaining, it was déjà vu for the Buckeyes and Hoosiers, as another handball gave the Buckeyes another penalty kick — which was again taken by Culbertson.However, there was no such luck on Culbertson’s second try, as Webb again dove right, only this time directly to where Culbertson shot the ball. The sophomore knocked it away, sealing the win for the Hoosiers.“That’s very hard to make two penalty kicks in one game,” Bluem said. “But we felt confident that he could do it, so we went with him, and I wouldn’t change the decision. I felt it was the right decision then and unfortunately their goalkeeper came up with a big play.”Indiana opened the scoring early in the second half, when heavy traffic in front of the net allowed the ball to bounce out to junior forward Femi Hollinger-Janzen, who deposited the shot into the empty net.“We defended poorly, on both goals against us today,” Bluem said. “That’s all I’ll say about that, we just defended poorly.”The Buckeyes controlled the ball throughout the majority of the first half. However, their aggressiveness did not lead to any scoring, as three goal-scoring opportunities — two shots by sophomore forward Danny Jensen wide of the net and a rocket off the foot of senior midfielder Max Moller knocked away by a diving Webb — all went for naught.“I think that we had the opportunity to score, myself included, and we didn’t put them away” Jensen said. “At the end of the day, you have to put those chances away to win the game against a top-10 team in the nation.”OSU is set to have five days off before traveling to Madison, Wisc., to take on the Wisconsin Badgers on Saturday. That match is scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. read more

Ohio States Kelsey Mitchell named 1st team USBWA AllAmerican 2nd team AP

OSU freshman guard Kelsey Mitchell (3) dribbles past James Madison junior guard Angela Mickens (32) during a NCAA Tournament first-round game on March 21 in Chapel Hill, N.C.. OSU won, 90-80.Credit: Courtesy of OSU athleticsOhio State women’s basketball guard Kelsey Mitchell become just the fourth freshman to be named a first team All-American by the United States Basketball Writers of America on Tuesday after leading the nation with 24.9 points per game.Mitchell, the Big Ten co-Player of the Year, was also named an Associated Press second team All-American.Her 873 total points this season set a new program and conference record, helping her become one of just five Buckeyes to make the AP first or second team. Mitchell’s debut collegiate campaign also saw her set an NCAA record with 127 3-pointers.The Cincinnati native led OSU in both points and assists this season.According to an OSU release, the USBWA All-American team consists of 10 players regardless of position. Being named among those 10 players makes you a finalist for the Ann Meyers Drysdale Award, given by the USBWA to the nation’s best player. That award is set to be handed out on Sunday.Mitchell led the Buckeyes to a 24-11 record and a 13-5 mark in conference play. OSU won its first two Big Ten Tournament games before earning a five-seed in the NCAA Tournament.The Buckeyes knocked James Madison out of the tournament in the first round with a 90-80 victory before losing to North Carolina on a last-second shot on March 23. Mitchell scored 25 points in the season-ending loss and tied the game at the free throw line with five seconds to play, completing a 21-point OSU comeback. The Tar Heels went on to score with less than a second on the clock to win the game.Along with leading the team in points and helpers, Mitchell averaged 4.2 rebounds per game and shot 83.5 percent from the free throw line.Mitchell’s honor comes a day after Ohio State men’s basketball freshman guard D’Angelo Russell was named a first team AP All-American after leading the Buckeyes in scoring in his first collegiate season as well. read more

The Best Missing a football match to help a leukemia patient

first_imgGerman footballer Lennart Thy might have saved a life after missing one Eredivisie game to donate stem cells in MarchWhen a fan thinks about footballers, they always think about fame and fortune. Many people believe this football stars are out of reach and don’t care about the fans.But German footballer Lennart Thy has shown everybody otherwise.In March of this year, the VVV-Venlo striker missed an important Dutch Eredivisie clash with PSV Eindhoven.The reason? He went to the hospital to donate stem cells and try to help a leukemia patient.Top 5 Bundesliga players to watch during the weekend Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 11, 2019 With the international activity cooling down for the next month, we go back to the Bundesliga’s Top 5 players to watch next weekend.The German…This unselfish reason has made him the winner of the FIFA Fair Play Award 2018 in The Best Gala Awards.Past 10 FIFA Fair Play Award Winners: 2009: Bobby Robson – England 2010: Haiti Women’s national U17 team 2011: Japan Football Association 2012: Uzbekistan Football Association 2013: Afghanistan Football Association 2014: World Cup volunteers 2015: Football organizations supporting refugees 2016: Atlético Nacional – Colombia 2017: Francis Koné – Togo 2018: Lennart Thy – GermanyCongratulations, Lennart Thy 👏Winner of The FIFA Fair Play Award 2018 🏆#TheBest #FIFAFootballAwards pic.twitter.com/pW5ETt2Kmd— #TheBest (@FIFAcom) September 24, 2018last_img read more