Students promote awareness for Relay for Life

first_imgPurple hair extensions, purple clothing and purple desserts in the dining halls will flood campus this week to promote fundraising and awareness for the Notre Dame Relay for Life, which will take place Apr. 12 and 13. Freshman Teresa Kennedy, honorary student chairperson for Notre Dame’s Relay for Life this year, the Relay committee is hosting Purple Week 2013 through Friday to engage students in its larger mission on campus. The funds raised through Notre Dame’s Relay for Life in April will go toward cancer research at the American Cancer Society, Kennedy said. “[Purple Week] really has a dual purpose because first, all the funds raised go to the Relay and the money we collect there,” Kennedy said. “It’s also a way to get people interested in the Relay and make it interactive, since all of these events are so public and hard to ignore.” Notre Dame Relay for Life chairperson Jessica Brookshire said the committee’s 2013 fundraising goal is $175,000. One of the most visible Purple Week activities is the sale of paper cutout feet, which can be purchased at locations all over campus for $1 each. Last year, paper feet sales raised $6,082 for the Relay, Brookshire said. “It was a great fundraiser as far as dollars raised, but also [for] the awareness it brought about for the event,” Brookshire said. Marc Burdell, an Alumni Association director and this year’s honorary faculty chairperson for the Relay for Life, said the paper feet have both symbolic and monetary value for the project. “Many of the buildings on campus sell these purple feet for $1 and they’re put up all over campus to build a kind of path that leads to the Relay for Life in April,” Burdell said. “For the first time this year, students can purchase feet with Domer Dollars at the Huddle and Reckers.” Kennedy said she is looking forward to “Wear Purple” day on Thursday, when community members are encouraged to dress in purple clothes to show support for the project. “It will be interesting to see how many people there are that day who are willing to back up this cause and really get behind it,” Kennedy said. “It’s two months ahead of the Relay still, but it will be great to see the purple as a visible sign of support.” Purple is “the identifying color for [cancer] surivivors,” Kennedy said, and she can include both herself and Burdell in that category. Kennedy survived a rare form of tissue cancer and Burdell overcame a serious lymphoma diagnosis. Burdell said he thinks of his position as honorary chairperson as an opportunity to connect with others who are affected by cancer. “I was diagnosed about three and a half years ago, and before that, I was healthy,” Burdell said. “I had never even been in the hospital. I went from being unaware and unaffected to being a pretty severe cancer patient. “Now, I can talk about patient advocacy and what people can do to support each other. I find myself today leading a normal life, and as chairperson, I hope to help others understand what I’ve gone through and let them know that they can be empowered to get through it too,” Burdell said. Kennedy said she was involved with the national Relay for Life in high school and that she’s pleased to have the opportunity to participate in the Notre Dame version of the event. “I’m glad I get to share my experience about what I went through with other people here, and I hope people will be able to come to me for support if they or someone they know has cancer,” Kennedy said. “I’m an example that you can lead a totally normal life after a cancer diagnosis.” Purple hair extensions will be sold in the Coleman Morse center on Friday, and purple feet will be sold all week across campus. Notre Dame’s Relay for Life will take place from Apr. 12 to 13 at the Compton Family Ice Arena. Information about the event can be found at relay.org/NDin.last_img read more

Victim finds courage as leader

first_imgDaisy Hernandez, author of “Colonize This!: Young Women of Color on Today’s Feminism,” kicked off Saint Mary’s Student Diversity Board’s (SDB) 8th annual leadership conference “From Awareness to Action,” on Tuesday, March 19 in Carroll Auditorium. Her broad “view of what leadership should be or can look like” set the stage for this year’s Student’s Diverse Leadership Conference (DSLC), the largest student-led conference in the Midwest. The keynote speaker was 11 years old when she had her first encounter with leadership. Her elementary school teacher prompted an argument on extraterrestrial existence on Neptune. Hernandez, cognizant of the fact she belonged to one of the few Latin American families in her New Jersey community, identified with the outsider and chose to affirm the E.T.’s presence. “My uncle – my favorite uncle – actually had Resident Alien written on his ID,” said Hernandez. Brought up in a Cuban-Colombian household, Hernandez belonged to a family of mixed immigration status. “I was always aware of the challenges. There is a lot of fear that comes with being undocumented,” said Hernandez. “It took me a while to piece together who in my own family had “papeles” and who didn’t.” After her teacher read the budding writer’s essay aloud, her classmates were in ascension -aliens must reside on Neptune. Although amused by her success, Hernandez realized the power of her essay “I realized that if I could convince those kids that aliens existed, I could convince people of anything,” said Hernandez. Hernandez acknowledged that her growth was facilitated by many of her open-minded teachers. They made the subject matter fascinating by establishing connections and making the material relatable, she said. The Catholic grammar school she attended had sex education classes in which concerned educators discussed HIV and AIDS in spite of the stigma that still existed in the 80s. She was exposed to the story of Ryan White, a teenager infected with HIV and barred from attending his high school as a result. “Who hasn’t been excluded at one time or another?” Hernandez said. Her all-girls high school showed her the value of creating a safe space by its support group for students who underwent abortions, she said. “Seeing what my teachers did outside of the classroom was inspiring.” In college, Hernandez began to identify herself as a feminist. “I think most people feel they’re beyond the ‘personal is political’ phrase, but I love it, and will always love it,” she said. Hernandez said she participated in “Taking Back the Night” and joined a march through her college. Once the group’s protest concluded and they returned to the student center to discuss, Hernandez recalled that a young man in the back stood up and said his girlfriend was a victim of sexual abuse and asked what he could do to fix it. “He had a very conventional idea of leadership. Very ‘I can solve this. I can do something about it,’” she said. “Of course, there was no solution. People told him he could not do anything but support her. In a way, get in touch with his own feelings.” Hernandez also referenced the first congressional Senate meeting in 10 years that took place last week to address sexual violence in the military. “A male survivor spoke before the Senate for the first time. He acknowledged he did not just speak for himself, other men had been abused,” she said. “That’s the kind of leadership in which survivors exist.” Hernandez, a bisexual woman and victim of sexual abuse, said she found herself through his courage, attributing her success as a leader to the idea of “engaged empathy.” “It is not pity,” said Hernandez. “It’s an appeal to our own sense of possibility. It unites us and then calls us to action. If we focus on the core of the issues, connections start to happen and changes made.” It was this potential that inspired “Colonize This!: Young Women of Color on Today’s Feminism.” The collection of carefully selected stories coedited by Hernandez includes pieces by people living incredibly diverse lives that encompass universal truths. “The feedback is shocking to me,” she said. “It created a sensation of connectedness with people who had completely different backgrounds. Hernandez stressed that its contributors were not bean-picked by race. “‘Curandera’ is Spanish for healer,” she said. “Books are ‘curanderas’ because of their healing force, their ability to create empathy.” Hernandez closed her speech by encouraging the audience to write their own book. “Art is such a great vehicle for social change,” Hernandez said.last_img read more

Temple game produces only two arrests

first_imgSaturday’s football home opener against Temple University brought more than 100,000 people to campus, and Director of Game Day Operations Mike Seamon said the day’s overall atmosphere was “absolutely elevated.” “It was definitely above what we would consider a normal standard for a typical opening day,” Seamon said. “Everything was energized … because people are excited about the season and there’s a key interest in Notre Dame football. [This weekend] was bigger than any of the home openers in the past two or three years.” Seamon said the stadium boasted a sellout crowd of approximately 82,000 people, and even more fans flooded campus Saturday for other game day events. Nearly 12,000 people attended Friday’s pep rally and about 5,000 participated in the tour of the stadium and tunnel on Friday, he said.  The number one concern for Saturday’s game was the weather forecast, Seamon said. “The weather was predicted to be very hot and humid, so we put together a big heat and humidity plan,” he said. “We put together a cooling station outside Gate A and worked with the first aid team to be sure we were prepared.  “It was a tough day weather-wise, but it could have been worse, thankfully. We had a good plan in place, and people did a good job watching out for each other so it went fairly well.” Phil Johnson, chief of police for Notre Dame Security Police, said the flow of traffic near campus on game day went smoothly despite construction. “Area police agencies worked cooperatively to promote public safety and smooth traffic flow,” Johnson said. “Everything with the new Douglas Road went very well. … Construction south of campus along South Bend Avenue didn’t adversely impact game day traffic.” Seamon said the outbound traffic was especially smooth after the game because not everybody stayed until the very end. “The game wasn’t very close, so a lot of people didn’t feel like they needed to stay until the last play,” he said. “It didn’t go down to the last minute so people left at different times, which really sped things up.” Police made two custodial arrests on campus Saturday, Johnson said. “One [arrest] was inside the stadium and one was outside,” Johnson said. “Both were arrested for public intoxication and disorderly conduct.” Seamon said another main concern was the implementation of the stadium’s new bag policy. “People were very receptive and understanding [of the policy] especially in light of the Boston Marathon tragedy,” he said. “We found that if you did not bring a bag, you got into the stadium quicker and that’s what we’d recommend in the future if you want to get in quickly.”last_img read more

The Shirt 2014 features new fabric on anniversary

first_imgMichael Yu | The Observer Students wondered what color, design and logo would adorn The Shirt 2014 as they stood waiting for the grand unveiling outside the Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore enjoying free food and cheerleading performances.The unveiling ceremony, which takes place each year on the day before the Blue-Gold Spring Game, began at 6 p.m.Students who bought The Shirt after the ceremony received a 15 percent discount on up to two Shirts.This year’s shirt features the outside and inside of the football stadium on the front and back of The Shirt, respectively. The Shirt 2014 is heather blue made with a 60 percent cotton and 40 percent polyester blend, sophomore Camden Hill, The Shirt executive committee’s designer, said.Hill said an obstacle designers faced was deciding on a concept. He said designers had to first design the 25th anniversary logo before proceeding to work on the design of The Shirt.“From a design standpoint, I think we were trying to do something new this year but not radically different from the previous years. We had to keep it consistent with kind of the image The Shirt has created, but we were looking into different things,” Hill said. “We wanted try a different color and we thought the 25th anniversary would be a great time to try a new fabric as well. The heathered fabric gives it a unique look, unlike the two previous blues.”Hill said unlike the previous years where The Shirt focused on certain players, this year’s shirt focused on the stadium.Junior John Wetzel, president of The Shirt executive committee, said, “Coach Kelly has had tremendous success at home during his time as a head coach, which is why we thought it was appropriate to feature the stadium as the main focus in this years shirt. With the design on the back we were hoping to [portray] all the pieces of the full Notre Dame football experience by including the band, the fans and the players.”Wetzel said an obstacle was making sure that the timing of the unveiling was perfect. They had to coordinate Brian Kelly’s arrival, the committee members changing into their shirts, the band being prepped play while also coordinating online and social media releases, he said.The unveiling ceremony coordinators senior Catherine Simonson and sophomore Catherine Williams spearheaded the majority of planning and coordination of the performances for the actual unveiling ceremony, Wetzel said.The committee expects to sell around 20,000 shirts in the first day, Wetzel said.As for improvements for next year’s planning process, Hill said, “I thought what could’ve benefitted us was nailing down a more specific concept initially. We were a little nebulous going into the design process, and we thought we were more specific than we were. … In retrospect, it would’ve been better to have a better more solid understanding of the concept before designing the shirt.”Hill said he has noticed a generally positive reaction to this year’s shirt design.“I take the anonymous Twitter comments to be the most telling, because they have nothing to lose; they aren’t trying to appease me, and even from those, I’ve heard a lot of good and positive feedback,” Hill said. Tags: The Shirt 2014last_img read more

Former vice president of business affairs dies

first_imgTags: Death, Notre Dame vice president, obituary, Vice President Thomas J. Mason, former Notre Dame vice president for business affairs, passed away Nov. 24 in Naples, Fla. at the age of 82, according to a University press release.“During his 20-year tenure, Mason exercised overall control of Notre Dame’s fiscal affairs and oversaw a nearly tenfold expansion of the University’s endowment, more than 30 major construction projects, the renovation of the Main Building and the expansion of Notre Dame Stadium,” the press release stated.Mason, who took the position in 1976, came to the Notre Dame after working at the University of Michigan for 10 years. In 1993, the Notre Dame Alumni Association named him an honorary alumnus, and the facilities services building on campus bears his name.“Much of higher education in recent years has been characterized by fiscal crisis and retrenchment,” University president emeritus Fr. Edward A. “Monk” Malloy said upon Mason’s retirement in 1996, according to the press release. “The fact that this has never been the case at Notre Dame is due in large measure to the financial and managerial acumen of Tom Mason. His legacy to the University is a fiscal planning and budget making model that should ensure our financial strength for years to come.”Mason earned a bachelor’s degree and a master’s of business administration from the University of Detroit in 1959 and 1963, respectively, and served in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War, according to the press release.A visitation will take place at 8:30 a.m., Saturday in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart. A funeral Mass will follow at 9:30 a.m.In lieu of flowers, the family requested that donations be made in Mason’s memory to the University of Detroit Mercy at 4001 W. McNichols Road, Detroit, MI 48221-3038; or to St. Agnes Parish, 7775 Vanderbilt Beach Road, Naples, FL 34120.last_img read more

Club Feature: the Identity Project

first_imgThe Identity Project of Notre Dame (IDND), a student club that addresses issues of sexuality and human dignity through the lens of Catholic Church teaching, is in the midst of planning its annual Edith Stein Project Conference.“The Edith Stein Project Conference is the largest student-run conference in the United States,” Hailey Vrdolyak, club co-vice president and junior, said. “The conference brings together 30 speakers to discuss what the Catholic Church can offer to the discussion of issues faced on college campuses, such as the hook-up culture, pornography and other topics regarding human sexuality.”Vrdolyak said past conferences have been attended by more than 300 people, including Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross students and professors. This year’s conference, to be held Feb. 6-7 in McKenna Hall, will address the theme of “Radiant Image: Cultivating Authentic Identity in the Modern World” and will focus on the central idea of living in God’s image, according to the IDND website.The conference namesake, Edith Stein, was canonized in 1998 as St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross and “fought for the truth and the dignity of women through her writings and frequent letters,” according to the IDND website. Working as a teacher, nurse and philosopher and eventually as a cloistered Carmelite nun, she was martyred at Auschwitz in 1942. The club website states: “We look to Edith Stein for inspiration as a model of turning one’s heart to God and as someone who lived her vocation with the genuine spirit of self-gift.”This year marks the tenth anniversary of the Edith Stein Project Conference.“The club was founded in 2004, and the first conference was held in the spring of 2005,” IDND president and senior Mary Kate Martinson said. “The Identity Project has hosted an annual conference every spring since its founding.”Although the annual conference serves as the club’s main event, IDND co-sponsors other campus events that promote the Catholic identity of Notre Dame and help students develop as Catholic leaders, Alexandra DeSanctis, IDND co-vice president and junior, said.The club meets on Tuesday nights at 7 p.m. in the McNeill Room of LaFortune.“We foster fruitful conversation about issues of identity … and healthy relationships,” DeSanctis said. “We often read articles on these topics and discuss in a group. The meetings are also often used as a time to plan for the conference.”Contact [email protected] or visit the club Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/identityND for more information about the club or the conference. Register for the conference online at www3.nd.edu/~idnd/. Registration is free for Notre, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross students.Tags: carmletine nun, Edith Stein, Edith Stein Project Conference, Identity Project, Identity Project Notre Dame, IDND, St. Teresa Benedicta of the Crosslast_img read more

Four years in review

first_imgFr. Theodore Hesburgh dies at 97On Feb. 26, 2015, Fr. Theodore Hesburgh, 15th president of Notre Dame and one of the most influential figures in higher education, died at the age of 97. Friends, family and the Notre Dame community came together to celebrate his life at his funeral held at the Basilica of the Sacred Heart on March 4, 2015.Former President of the United States Jimmy Carter and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, M.A. class of 1975, topped a long list of dignitaries who offered reflections at the memorial service for Hesburgh on March 4 in Purcell Pavilion.Other speakers included Carter’s wife, former First Lady Rosalynn Carter; former president of Princeton University William Bowen; Indiana Sen. Joe Donnelly, class of 1977 and Law School class of 1981; Dillon Hall rector Fr. Paul Doyle; former football head coach Lou Holtz; archbishop emeritus of Washington Cardinal Theodore McCarrick; Indiana Gov. Mike Pence; Board of Trustees member Martin W. Rogers, class of 1988; former Wyoming Sen. Alan Simpson and former Pennsylvania Sen. Harris Wofford.University President Fr. John Jenkins described Fr. Hesburgh as a moral force in a statement sent to the student body.“While serving four Popes and accepting 16 presidential appointments, Father Ted was a moral force in virtually all major social issues of his day, including civil rights, peaceful uses of atomic energy, campus unrest, treatment of Vietnam draft evaders, third-world development and immigration reform.“Next to Notre Dame’s founder, Father Edward Sorin, C.S.C., no one has had a greater impact on the University than Father Ted. With his appointments to the faculty, his creation of great centers and institutes for scholarship and research, his commitment to our Catholic character, and, most of all, his leadership, charisma and vision, he turned what was a school well-known for football into one of the nation’s great institutions for higher learning.”Twelve ND, SMC students lost in four years2012 witnessed the passing of two students. On Oct. 18, Saint Mary’s sophomore Ziqi Zhang died from injuries sustained in a collision between her bike and an SUV outside of the main entrance to Saint Mary’s on State Road 933. Zhang was a dual-degree student at Saint Mary’s taking engineering classes at Notre Dame.Michael Thigpen, a first year master’s student and professional musician, died Nov. 13 at his off-campus residence. He is remembered by his loved ones for his caring nature and strong desire to help people.Connor Sorensen died Dec. 20, 2013 after a lifelong battle with lung disease, along with other health-related issues. Sorensen was able to graduate early, despite his deteriorating health. His friends described him as relentless in his motivation to find cures for diseases, due to his personal experiences.Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s lost two students in 2014. Third-year Ph.D. student Akash Sharma died Jan. 1. Sharma was studying chemical and biomolecular engineering and worked as a teaching assistant. He was from India.Saint Mary’s first-year Madelyn Stephenson died when her car was hit on the driver’s side by a semi-tractor Jan. 3. She had a passion for learning Arabic and her loved ones described her as a shy, smart girl.Five Notre Dame students were lost in 2015. Sophomore Daniel Kim was found dead Feb. 6 in his off-campus residence. A former fencer, Kim was a business student from New Jersey.Senior finance major Lisa Yang died March 3; her death was ruled a suicide by the St. Joseph County Coroner’s Office. She was a resident of McGlinn Hall and friends said she was naturally good at everything she tried.Senior Billy Meckling died in the early hours of May 16 after falling from the roof of the Joyce Athletic and Convocation Center; he was set to graduate the following day. Meckling was a four-year member of the Irish varsity fencing team, winning two monograms.Rebecca Townsend, a member of the incoming class of 2019, died July 2 after she and a friend were struck by a car during a Fourth of July celebration. She graduated with honors from Immaculate High School in Danbury, Connecticut.Junior Jake Scanlan, a mechanical engineering major from North Potomac, Maryland was found unresponsive in his bed in Siegfried Hall on Nov. 11; he was pronounced dead shortly thereafter. His friends said he treated everyone like an old friend and loved to make people smile.In 2016, Notre Dame lost two students. Third-year law student Karabo Moleah, 26, died March 31 in Philadelphia; he had been studying in the Law School’s Washington D.C. program. He had previously lived in the Fischer O’Hara Grace student community, and his friends remember his questioning nature and intelligence.On March 9, junior Theresa Sagartz was found dead in her off-campus residence from natural causes related to a chronic medical condition. A third generation member of the Notre Dame community, Sagartz was in the College of Science. Her friends and family remember her as adventurous, self-assured and generous with her time.Major Headlines in the last four yearsNotre Dame initiates suit over HHS mandate, August 24, 2014:On May 21, 2012, Notre Dame filed a lawsuit to challenge the constitutionality of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) mandate that requires employers to provide contraceptive services in their minimum health insurance plans. After a long court battle and a series of re-filings and appeals, Notre Dame filed a petition Oct. 3, 2014 requesting that the Supreme Court review a previous ruling by a federal court of appeals against Notre Dame. On May 9, 2015, the Supreme Court remanded the case to the same federal court of appeals, which again ruled against Notre Dame on May 19, 2015.University recognizes LGBTQ organization, Dec. 5, 2012:On Dec. 5, 2012, the University released a formal statement declaring the result of a review process that lasted five months: the administrative support for students identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning would be increased. The recognition of the student organization, PrismND, was included in this statement.Students abroad witness papal election, March 19, 2013:On March 13, 2013, Jorge Mario Bergoglio, now known as Pope Francis, was elected Pope Benedict’s successor after two weeks of consideration by the conclave of cardinals. Pope Francis is the first Latin American Pope and the third consecutive non-Italian. Many of the Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s students who were abroad witnessed the turnover in St. Peter’s Square.Campus Crossroads, Jan. 24, 2014:On Jan. 29, 2014, the University announced the $400 million “Campus Crossroads Project.” The undertaking is a renovation to the stadium, which will include classrooms, recreational facilities, meeting rooms and a student center. The purpose of the endeavor is to centralize every element of campus life in one location.Notre Dame announced new school for global affairs, Oct. 1, 2014;On Oct. 1, 2014, the University announced plans to open the Donald R. Keough School of Global Affairs, the first new college at the University in nearly a century. It will be based in Jenkins Hall, a new building currently under construction, and R. Scott Appleby will serve as the Marilyn Keough Dean at the school.ESPN sues Notre Dame for record access, Jan. 15, 2015On Jan. 15, 2015, ESPN filed a lawsuit against Notre Dame claiming NDSP violated Indiana’s public records law by refusing to release campus  police records. Although the trial court judge ruled in Notre Dame’s favor in April 2015, ESPN won the appeal March 15, 2016 when the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled that NDSP is a public agency. Tags: Campus Crossroads, Commencement 2016, Four Years in Review, HHS Mandate, Irish Guard, keough school for global affairs, papal election, Student deathslast_img read more

Notre Dame community members discuss racial issues, love

first_imgMembers of the Notre Dame community gathered in the Joyce Center on Tuesday to celebrate and honor Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, hearing from a panel entitled “A Call to Love: Bridging the Racial Divide.” Speakers discussed racial issues both in the world  and at Notre Dame, reflecting on how love and hope can help mend divides among groups. The panel was moderated by Jennifer Mason McAward, director of the Klau Center for Civil and Human Rights and associate professor of law. The panelists were Rev. Hugh Page, vice president and associate provost of undergraduate affairs; Rev. Peter McCormick, C.S.C., director of Campus Ministry; Ernest Morrell, director of the Center for Literacy Education; Notre Dame senior Alyssa Ngo; professor of art Maria Tomasula; and third-year law student Cameasha Turner. McAward began the discussion by giving a general definition of racism and asked the panel what they believe racism to be and how they see its manifestation in society. “Bigotry involves individual, interpersonal acts of meanness, based on a recipient’s racial, ethnic or cultural identity,” McAward said. “Racism refers to the systematic distribution of resources, power and opportunity in our society to the benefit of people who are white and the exclusion of people of color.”Ngo drew the distinction between individualized racism and systemic racism, stating that people should realize that the type of racism that most permeates society is systemic. “In terms of a systemic, institutionalized matter of discrimination, that’s what we’re talking about when we’re talking about racism … and I think it’s important that we get that definition on the table,” she said.Morrell agreed with Ngo but countered that individual racism is what perpetuates the cycle of hate throughout the years.“It’s the thoughts that individuals have that undergird the system … Our thoughts about others, our perceptions about others, that undergirds the system. While I would agree that racism is systemic, it is only sustainable because of individuals’ thoughts and actions in our society,” Morrell said. The panel then moved on to discussing the Inclusive Campus Climate Survey, focusing on the fact that 47 percent of students did not agree that Notre Dame demonstrated an authentic commitment to diversity. “There is no shortage of work to do in every aspect of life that we have here,” Page said.“When we think about this mission and tradition, it comes back to who’s making these decisions,” McCormick said. “If we believe our mission to be robust enough that it can enlighten hearts and minds and that other people from varying perspectives can come and take it and amplify it, in my estimation, we should strive in every way to allow that to be accomplished.”In addition, Turner discussed the disparity between the values taught in the Christian tradition and the action taken by churchgoers. “I challenge, not only the students, the faculty to re-examine what it means to be a Christian and not just attend Mass, not just attend church and be okay in that moment, but to actually leave church, to leave these panel discussions and implement what we talked about, what the pastor preached and what the priest told us,” Turner said. The conversation then turned to King’s provocative quote, “I have decided to stick with love. Hate is too great a burden to bear,” and discussing how love affects the movement to end racism. “If you take the lead of Dr. King and embrace the idea of a commitment to love and a commitment to justice, then that really is a demanding call that requires both soul-searching and, really, truth-telling,” Morrell said. Tomasula echoed Morrell’s idea of love that requires action and hard work. “For me, love that doesn’t move beyond a feeling, that’s fine, but not that useful and not that useful for a struggle that Dr. King was engaged in,” Tomasula said. “However, as I said, love can take many forms, and love that takes the form of action seems to be the sort of love that’s needed.” The panel then moved to talk about the next steps to combat racism both at the University and in the world. Ngo cautioned against simply using prayer as an excuse to stay complacent in the fight for racial justice. “We are instruments of God’s plan on Earth, and so if we are praying to God to end racism, how are we acting as instruments to end racism,” she said.McCormick echoed this point, saying that people should not pick and choose when to be involved in the anti-racist movement, but rather fully commit to the cause.“How is it, then, that we encounter one another, learn from one another, engage one another, educate one another, because something beautiful is possible,” McCormick said. “But when we hold back and only choose to opt in here or there or when we choose, something is lost in the process.”The conversation ended with panelists expressing their hopes for the future of equality despite the despair that often arises due to the sheer volume of the task ahead. “I have hope because we’re here,” Page said. “I have hope because of this panel. I have hope because of Walk the Walk Week, not only because of what it represents in terms of our concrete steps to build positive relationships with one another and to engage in a soul-searching, transformational world that will help us live into the aspirations that we have, but also that we are in the process of building things that will stand the test of time and survive all of us. Walk the Walk Week is an institutional investment in the creation of structures that will survive even without those of us that are here.”Tags: Call to Love panel, martin luther king jr. day, Racism, Walk the Walk Weeklast_img read more

Saint Mary’s students react to renewed indoor dining by reservation, introduction of plexiglass partitions

first_imgIn past years, campus dining at Saint Mary’s consisted of students cramming almost 12 people around a table, enjoying meals and studying for hours on end.Since August, dining at Saint Mary’s has looked a little different — students laying out blankets, eating on the grass or dining in a tent on the Student Center lot. Some students eat their meals in the dorm lounges or even in their rooms. The College’s dining experience is changing once again, following a Sept. 30 email from dean of student academic services Karen Chambers, announcing a return to indoor dining. The email explained if students wish to dine inside, they are to make reservations through PRISM — similar to signing up for a class — and are expected to appear within the designated block of time.Students are now able to dine indoors with four to a table behind plexiglass barriers separating them from each other. While some students said they are grateful for the effort put forth, others are struggling to adapt to the new dining experience.Sophomore Erin Dotson emphasized that the plexiglass barriers are an impediment to having an enjoyable conversation.“You can hear your voice reverberating through the glass, and it’s incredibly difficult to hear while trying to have conversations with your friend group, even when at the same table,” Dotson said.Though indoor dining options offer an opportunity to escape the cooler weather, the glass partitions look strange and separate friends from each other, first year Emerson Henry said.“I think it’s great to have indoor dining again since it’s getting cold, but I am also not a fan of the plexiglass,” Henry said. “It’s kind of hard to hear with the plexiglass, especially for being hearing impaired.”As the days get colder and more individuals might wish to eat inside, Henry said she’s worried the limited seating space might create problems for the student body.“We want to eat inside, but it’s just going to get harder as it’s gets colder and people are going to fight for tables,” she said.Juniors Isabella Thompson-Davoli and Sarah Frick agreed that the half-hour time slots provide another challenge, as normally meals are very casual and people tend to meet up at arbitrary times.“It is very difficult to plan and stay on a strict schedule of exactly when we should eat,” Frick said.Thompson-Davoli and Frick said they think a better approach would be to have a restaurant-like system, where a host directs you to a table, instead of the current system which requires that one abide by a strict schedule and routine.“The limit of only four people to a table due to the plexiglass barriers was difficult,” Thompson-Davoli said.Some students voiced concerns about the elimination of the ice cream machine, which was considered a dining hall staple in previous years.“I was expecting dining to be a focal point of where you meet your friends, where you interact and see other people that you didn’t see during the day,” first-year Reese Bauer said. “[The dining hall is] supposed to be a place to get away from any social drama or stress that we’re feeling and a place to just relax. Especially during COVID, there is no way to ‘get away,’ and this can’t serve as a getting away place either.”Despite these difficulties, Dotson said she is happy to have the opportunity to eat indoors again.“I think the efforts put forth by the school are taken into consideration,” she said. “If they forced us to eat in our rooms, then I wouldn’t be able to do that. They are putting forth an effort and I am grateful.”Tags: Campus DIning, covid precautions, Noble Family Dining Halllast_img read more

USNS Comfort Arrives In NY To Aid In Coronavirus Battle

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Photo: Bill Mesta / U.S. NavyNEW YORK — Critical relief arrived to New York on Monday in the form of the U.S. Naval Ship Comfort.The ship is expected to help doctors and nurses on the front line of the coronavirus pandemic.There have been more than 66,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in New York State. Only Seneca County has no reported cases.“Anyone who says this situation is a New York City-only situation is in a state of denial,” Gov. Andrew Cuomo said. “You see this virus move across the state. You see it move across this nation.” The Governor had a statewide healthcare establishment meeting to work together and foster more coordination.“We have hospitals in Upstate New York that are experiencing none of this — where they have staff capacity; they have bed capacity,” he said. “We need you now, here, in this fight and engaged.”As the virus spreads, Cuomo said the state “desperately” needs supplies. He said states, private hospitals and the federal government continue to compete against one another, which drives the prices up.“We’ve created a situation where you literally have hundreds of entities looking to buy the same exact materials, basically from the same place, which is China,” Cuomo explained.The Governor said that ventilators that once cost $20,000 to $30,000 can now cost $50,000.last_img read more