Notre Dame community members discuss racial issues, love

first_imgMembers of the Notre Dame community gathered in the Joyce Center on Tuesday to celebrate and honor Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, hearing from a panel entitled “A Call to Love: Bridging the Racial Divide.” Speakers discussed racial issues both in the world  and at Notre Dame, reflecting on how love and hope can help mend divides among groups. The panel was moderated by Jennifer Mason McAward, director of the Klau Center for Civil and Human Rights and associate professor of law. The panelists were Rev. Hugh Page, vice president and associate provost of undergraduate affairs; Rev. Peter McCormick, C.S.C., director of Campus Ministry; Ernest Morrell, director of the Center for Literacy Education; Notre Dame senior Alyssa Ngo; professor of art Maria Tomasula; and third-year law student Cameasha Turner. McAward began the discussion by giving a general definition of racism and asked the panel what they believe racism to be and how they see its manifestation in society. “Bigotry involves individual, interpersonal acts of meanness, based on a recipient’s racial, ethnic or cultural identity,” McAward said. “Racism refers to the systematic distribution of resources, power and opportunity in our society to the benefit of people who are white and the exclusion of people of color.”Ngo drew the distinction between individualized racism and systemic racism, stating that people should realize that the type of racism that most permeates society is systemic. “In terms of a systemic, institutionalized matter of discrimination, that’s what we’re talking about when we’re talking about racism … and I think it’s important that we get that definition on the table,” she said.Morrell agreed with Ngo but countered that individual racism is what perpetuates the cycle of hate throughout the years.“It’s the thoughts that individuals have that undergird the system … Our thoughts about others, our perceptions about others, that undergirds the system. While I would agree that racism is systemic, it is only sustainable because of individuals’ thoughts and actions in our society,” Morrell said. The panel then moved on to discussing the Inclusive Campus Climate Survey, focusing on the fact that 47 percent of students did not agree that Notre Dame demonstrated an authentic commitment to diversity. “There is no shortage of work to do in every aspect of life that we have here,” Page said.“When we think about this mission and tradition, it comes back to who’s making these decisions,” McCormick said. “If we believe our mission to be robust enough that it can enlighten hearts and minds and that other people from varying perspectives can come and take it and amplify it, in my estimation, we should strive in every way to allow that to be accomplished.”In addition, Turner discussed the disparity between the values taught in the Christian tradition and the action taken by churchgoers. “I challenge, not only the students, the faculty to re-examine what it means to be a Christian and not just attend Mass, not just attend church and be okay in that moment, but to actually leave church, to leave these panel discussions and implement what we talked about, what the pastor preached and what the priest told us,” Turner said. The conversation then turned to King’s provocative quote, “I have decided to stick with love. Hate is too great a burden to bear,” and discussing how love affects the movement to end racism. “If you take the lead of Dr. King and embrace the idea of a commitment to love and a commitment to justice, then that really is a demanding call that requires both soul-searching and, really, truth-telling,” Morrell said. Tomasula echoed Morrell’s idea of love that requires action and hard work. “For me, love that doesn’t move beyond a feeling, that’s fine, but not that useful and not that useful for a struggle that Dr. King was engaged in,” Tomasula said. “However, as I said, love can take many forms, and love that takes the form of action seems to be the sort of love that’s needed.” The panel then moved to talk about the next steps to combat racism both at the University and in the world. Ngo cautioned against simply using prayer as an excuse to stay complacent in the fight for racial justice. “We are instruments of God’s plan on Earth, and so if we are praying to God to end racism, how are we acting as instruments to end racism,” she said.McCormick echoed this point, saying that people should not pick and choose when to be involved in the anti-racist movement, but rather fully commit to the cause.“How is it, then, that we encounter one another, learn from one another, engage one another, educate one another, because something beautiful is possible,” McCormick said. “But when we hold back and only choose to opt in here or there or when we choose, something is lost in the process.”The conversation ended with panelists expressing their hopes for the future of equality despite the despair that often arises due to the sheer volume of the task ahead. “I have hope because we’re here,” Page said. “I have hope because of this panel. I have hope because of Walk the Walk Week, not only because of what it represents in terms of our concrete steps to build positive relationships with one another and to engage in a soul-searching, transformational world that will help us live into the aspirations that we have, but also that we are in the process of building things that will stand the test of time and survive all of us. Walk the Walk Week is an institutional investment in the creation of structures that will survive even without those of us that are here.”Tags: Call to Love panel, martin luther king jr. day, Racism, Walk the Walk Weeklast_img read more

Equifax made major errors that led to hack, Smith concedes

first_img continue reading » Equifax Inc.’s former chief executive officer said the credit-reporting company didn’t meet its responsibility to protect sensitive consumer information, confirming that the failure to fix a software vulnerability months ago led to the theft of more than 140 million Americans’ personal data.Richard Smith apologized for the breach and outlined a chronology of key events in testimony prepared for House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing set for Tuesday, according to a copy obtained by Bloomberg. He blamed human errors, particularly the failure to repair the problematic software despite warnings from the federal government and the company’s own security team.“To each and every person affected by this breach, I am deeply sorry that this occurred,” Smith said. “The company failed to prevent sensitive information from falling into the hands of wrongdoers.” 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Duncan, James set to break their Finals tie

first_imgSan Antonio Spurs forward Tim Duncan (21) shoots against Oklahoma City Thunder forward Serge Ibaka in overtime of Game 6 of the Western Conference finals NBA basketball playoff series in Oklahoma City, Saturday, May 31, 2014. San Antonio won 112-107 and advanced to the NBA Finals. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)MIAMI (AP) — Over the last 10 seasons, only one NBA player has been part of more wins than LeBron James.His name is Tim Duncan.Their numbers over that decade are incredibly similar. Duncan has appeared in 622 regular-season and playoff victories, James has played in 621. Duncan is shooting 50.2 percent from the field, James is shooting 50 percent. Duncan has won three championships over that stretch, James has two.Plus, when facing each other in the NBA Finals, both has won one, lost one.Here comes the tiebreaker — a Finals rematch that will have high expectations.Miami and San Antonio are the league’s last two teams standing for the second consecutive year, their next chapter starting on the Spurs’ home floor Thursday night. The Heat won a wild series last season for their second straight championship, needing a frantic rally to avoid elimination in Game 6 and then riding the strength of a 37-point, 12-rebound effort from James to top the Spurs in Game 7.“I think our guys, they actually grew from the loss last year,” Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said. “I call it fortitude. I think they showed an unbelievable amount of fortitude. If I can compliment my own team humbly, to have that tough loss, especially the Game 6 and not have a pity party and come back this year and get back to the same position, I think that’s fortitude.”It’s the league’s first Finals rematch since Chicago and Utah played in 1997 and 1998.The teams have actually played three times since last season’s classic series ended, twice in the regular season, another being a preseason meeting in Miami where the Spurs acknowledged that the pain of losing Game 7 on that floor was still real.Then again, it’s almost like they wanted to feel that hurt at times. Popovich showed the Spurs clips of Games 6 and 7 early in training camp this season, not so much to open old wounds but rather speed up the healing process.“We were just trying to put it away, just get over that part of it, learn from it, and move forward from there,” Duncan said.Move forward, they did.San Antonio won 62 games in the regular season, the best record in the league. One of those wins was a 24-point romp over Miami, on the same floor where this series will start on Thursday.The Heat know what wanting revenge feels like. They lost the 2011 NBA Finals to Dallas, then opened the following season on the Mavericks’ floor and simply blew them away.Heat forward Chris Bosh called it “extra motivation” for the Spurs.“It’s just something that we have to deal with, and we know that they’re going to be very passionate, and they’re going to play some good basketball,” Bosh said. “So whoever we play, we just have to continue to keep our approach the same and play good basketball.”While the Spurs were punching their ticket by ousting Oklahoma City from the West finals on Saturday night, the Heat were getting a day off. James was taking his kids to see X-Men. James Jones went to a home-improvement store for some supplies. Bosh insisted he was going to do as little as possible, and Heat coach Erik Spoelstra isn’t summoning his team to practice again until Monday.By then, James will be locked in on the Spurs.“It hasn’t really hit us that much yet because I think we’re in it,” James said Friday night after Miami beat Indiana and clinched its fourth consecutive East championship. “I think it will once we’re done and we’re able to look back at what we were able to accomplish as players, as a franchise. I think that’s when it will really hit us. We definitely don’t take it for granted to be in this position.”So for the next few days, all the highlights of last year’s finals will be played over and over again.The shot by Tony Parker — who missed the second half of Saturday night’s game with a left ankle injury — to win Game 1 in Miami for the Spurs. James’ twirl-on-the-rim dunk as the Heat pulled away in Game 2. San Antonio sharpshooter Danny Green’s Finals-record 3-point display. Bosh’s rebound that led to Ray Allen’s shot that saved Miami’s season in Game 6. The yellow rope, the precursor to a Spurs celebration that never happened.All made for an epic series.The encore could be even better.“Obviously we are very happy and pleased with the season we have had so far, but we are not by any means satisfied,” Green said. “We know we have a lot of work to do against a very good team. There is a reason why they’re back there and are two-time champs. We have our work cut out for us, but we are happy with going back — just not satisfied.”last_img read more