Raiders’ Antonio Brown loves the daily grind of football

first_imgALAMEDA — There were no controversial sound bites or on-field theatrics, just the sight of a serious pro going about his business during a football practice in late May.Which is why the Raiders traded for Antonio Brown in the first place after nine seasons with the Pittsburgh Steelers, the last six of which would rival any receiver in the history of the sport.The Raiders began Week 2 of their organized team activities Tuesday, with Brown extracting as much as he could from each repetition. …last_img

Soybean leaders remember friend, advocate Rob Joslin

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The American Soybean Association (ASA) this week remembers our friend, former ASA president, spirited soybean advocate and Ohio grower, Rob Joslin, who passed away on May 25 at age 63.Rob was a lifelong farmer in Shelby County, Ohio, with his wife Ellen. He began farming fulltime after graduating from The Ohio State University in 1975. Rob had a lifelong relationship with 4-H and enjoyed learning parliamentary procedures during his early years at Starting Farmers 4-H Club. Later he enjoyed putting those experiences to work in his endeavors with the soybean associations.Rob was active at ASA for 10 years and served as president in 2010. He was a dedicated supporter of ASA’s World Soy Foundation and also served on the board of the United States Soybean Export Council (USSEC), including one year as board secretary. He was an active member and past officer in the Ohio Soybean Association, serving as president and chairman over the years.Rob made a big impact on the soybean industry and many growers, leaders and friends shared their memories and kind words to honor him on ASA’s Facebook page this week:“This man started out being my mentor when I became an ASA director and ended up being a great friend,” Bob Worth said. “Rob was always such a wonderful inspiration and advocate for the Young Leader Program. My deepest sympathies to Ellen and the rest of his family,” said Michelle Beck Siegel. “So sad to learn of Rob’s passing. One of the leaders always willing to give advice or ask for advice. Very humble man in best sense of the word,” said Gary Joachim.“The ag community lost a great leader. Our prayers extend to the entire Joslin family,” said Jeff Wuebker. Rob was a member of the Farm Foundation NFP and was currently a Trustee at Edison State Community College. He had served as a zoning officer for Clinton Township. He was also a current member of the Ohio Corn Grower and Wheat Growers Association, Ohio Farm Bureau, a lifetime member of Shelby County OSU Alumni and Sidney Rotary Club, and member of the Sidney Moose, Elks and VFW. He enjoyed sailing and riding his ’85 Harley FX.Rob is survived by his wife Ellen, along with daughter, Gail Elizabeth Joslin of Wilmington, N.C., one brother, William “Woody” Joslin and wife Ann of Maplewood, and one sister, Mary Ellen Drees of Tavares, Fla.Rob was a member of St. John’s Lutheran Church where Funeral Services will be held Sunday, May 29, 2016 at 1:30 p.m. with Rev. Jonathan W. Schriber officiating. Burial will follow at Graceland Cemetery in Sidney. The family will receive friends on Saturday from 4-8 p.m. at Cromes Funeral Home 302 S. Main Ave, Sidney, Ohio.The family requests that memorials be made to Shelby County 4-H Foundation, St. John’s Lutheran Church Memorial Fund, and American Heart Association. Condolences may be expressed to the Joslin family at the funeral home’s website, www.cromesfh.com.ASA’s thoughts and prayers are with Rob’s wife Ellen and his entire family.last_img read more

How to Be Better At Creating Rapport

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now Anonymous says, “I am not good at gaining rapport. I need to be better with people.” I don’t have all of the answers, but I have some ideas our friend anonymous might work with for a while.Smile: Want to know the quickest way to open people up and create rapport? Smile. It’s really that simple. A smile creates a positive response in the person you are meeting with. It says that you are a friend, that you are pleasant, that you are happy. All of these allow them to let their guard down.Be Human: Well, you’re already human. But be really human. Share the things that make you human. You have feelings. You have a husband or a wife or a significant other or kids or a hobby or something. Sharing the experiences that make you human make it safe for the person you are engaging with to share theirs. Boom! Connected.Be Vulnerable: Being vulnerable creates a connection. This is something more than just being human. Vulnerability means you are open enough that you can be hurt. That openness means that you trust someone with your vulnerability, and by giving your trust, you gain trust.Listen: If you want to generate rapport, be a great listener. A good set of questions that allows the other person to talk is better than any statements you might make. A good conversation is give and take, but if you want rapport, leave others more room than you believe is necessary. They won’t talk? Try being vulnerable and then be really, really quiet.Have a Sense of Humor: A sense of humor can really help create rapport. People want to be around people they enjoy spending time with. A sense of humor says that this can be fun—or at least pleasant. It can shrink seemingly big issues to a more manageable size. Humor can break the ice, and it can warm up a cold shoulder.Rapport isn’t “I like you.” Rapport is “I am like you.”What advice do you have for Anonymous?last_img read more