Jesus is ‘always making us new’: Archbishop Justin’s Easter sermon

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Anglican Communion, Archbishop of Canterbury, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Press Release Service Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI [Lambeth Palace — Press Release] Archbishop Justin has said in his Easter sermon that pinning hopes on individuals in politics and public life is “always a mistake”. But he said Holy Week and Easter remind us of the power of God and the fallibility of human beings – lessons which liberate us to be merciful with each other.Speaking at Canterbury Cathedral 10 days after his inauguration, the Archbishop of Canterbury used his first Easter sermon today to warn against “hero leader culture” in our public life.Archbishop Justin said: “Setting people or institutions up to heights where they cannot but fail is mere cruelty. A cynical abandonment of all except my own security is as bad. One is ignorant of human nature and the other of God.”By contrast, he said, Holy Week and Easter “show us the reality of God and human beings.”The disciples, he said, had pinned all their hopes on Jesus – and on the people of Israel to recognise Him. But “the rulers of Israel held on to what they knew, for fear of something unexpected and worse, and did what we all do: failed to see the evidence of God in front of them.”The Archbishop continued: “It happens again and again. Familiar discomfort is often reassuring compared to the fearful consequences of change. Tenuous semblances of power are better than the apparent gamble on God’s faithfulness.”But the reality of God and human beings emphasised over the Easter period, he said, is one “that equips us for action in the world, action that is based on hope and realism, not on cynicism or fear.”Archbishop Justin stressed that “a joyful and celebratory church is based not in vain human optimism but in the certainty that God raised Jesus from the dead and will also raise us.“As a result we know our fallibility and become merciful with each other, we know God’s call and never give up working for and expecting a new shape and life to the church.”He added: “God gives us life in all fullness when we open our lives to Him. The church heals lonely brokenness with love and forgiveness of one another. We find the grasp of the risen Jesus always making us new. We are aflame with the truth that Christ is risen, and life is filled with creative hope and purpose.”The full text of the sermon is below. Audio and video will be added soon.Archbishop Justin’s sermon at Canterbury Cathedral, Easter Sunday, 31 March 2013Isaiah 65:17-end, Acts 10:34-43, John 20:1-18I wonder how many people here think that the future will be better than the past, and all problems can be solved if we put our minds to it. There is a general sense that if that is not the case then it ought to be, and someone must be doing something to stop it. Illusion is replaced by disappointment, both wrong.The hero leader culture has the same faults. A political party gets a new leader and three months later there is comment about disappointment. An economy suffers the worst blow in generations with a debt crisis and economic downturn, and the fact that not everything is perfect within five years is seen as total failure. Complexity and humanity are ignored and we end up unreasonably disappointed with every institution, group and policy, from politicians to NHS, education to environment.Papers reported on Friday that only 40% of churchgoers are convinced that the new Archbishop of Canterbury can resolve the problems of the Church of England. I do hope that means the other 60% thought the idea so barking mad that they did not answer the question.Holy Week and Easter show us the reality of God and of human beings. It is a reality that equips us for action in the world, action that is based on hope and realism, not on cynicism or fear.The disciples had expected that Israel would be delivered, and pinned all their hopes on Jesus as the deliverer, and on the people of Israel, including its leaders, recognising Him as such. That was a double mistake. As human beings we tend to live in the present, holding on to what we can. It is called sin. So the rulers of Israel held on to what they knew, for fear of something unexpected and worse, and did what we all do, failed to see the evidence of God in front of them.It happens again and again. Familiar discomfort is often reassuring compared to the fearful consequences of change. Tenuous semblances of power are better than the apparent gamble on God’s faithfulness. The church has often fallen into the trap. In the eighteenth century the Church of England drove out the Methodists. In the sixteenth century Rome drove out the Reformers. Societies that cling to the present or some golden age in the past fall prey to fear. Groups that cling to power sink into oppression.As well as fear a false view of people leads to hero leaders, who always fail. Put not your trust in new leaders, better systems, new organisations or regulatory reorganisation. They may well be good and necessary, but will to some degree fail. Human sin means pinning hopes on individuals is always a mistake, and assuming that any organisation is able to have such good systems that human failure will be eliminated is naïve.We have to know God as well as human beings, or we are left with cynical despair. The disciples also had a wrong view of God. They did not understand that Jesus must die and must rise from the dead. Human disaster thus became ultimate disaster.The accounts of the resurrection are brutally honest about the pervasive ignorance of the disciples. Key phrases are about not knowing, not understanding, believing without insight. Even Mary, the apostle to the apostles, the first witness, is able to say no more than “I have seen the Lord”, and what He said.The reading from Acts shows the consequence of the Easter revolution. Peter has an open mind to the biggest change that could be imagined, the recognition that God has no favourites and that the Gentiles can be part of the church. He is spending his life in a state of joyful expectation because God is the one who raised Jesus from the dead. He is exploring the love and mercy of God in reaching to a lost and sinful humanity with a saving love for all.That brings us back to our own day. Isaiah was speaking to a people in despair, and his treatment is celebration. “Be glad and rejoice for ever in what I am creating”. A right view of God sees Him as overflowing with such creative force that all our expectations of the future are radically altered and our joy leaps. Alleluia, Christ is risen.A joyful and celebratory church is based not in vain human optimism but in the certainty that God raised Jesus from the dead and will also raise us. As a result we know our fallibility and become merciful with each other, we know God’s call and never give up working for and expecting a new shape and life to the church.Human fallibility recognised, God’s sovereignty trusted; these are also the only stable foundation for human beings in society. Setting people or institutions up to heights where they cannot but fail is mere cruelty. A cynical abandonment of all except my own security is as bad. One is ignorant of human nature and the other of God.This is the triumph of Easter demanding that we reach out through the awareness of our flawed humanity to the love of God who catches us, and fills our lives; RS Thomas wrote:To look forward? Ah,what balance is needed atthe edges of such an abyss.I am alone on the surfaceof a turning planet. Whatto do but, like Michelangelo’sAdam, put my handout into unknown space,hoping for the reciprocating touch?God gives us life in all fullness when we open our lives to Him. The church heals lonely brokenness with love and forgiveness of one another. We find the grasp of the risen Jesus always making us new. We are aflame with the truth that Christ is risen, and life is filled with creative hope and purpose.© Justin Welby 2013 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Posted Mar 31, 2013 Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Jesus is ‘always making us new’: Archbishop Justin’s Easter sermon Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL center_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Holy Week/Easter Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NClast_img read more

Spartans still face plenty of questions after bowl victory

first_img First Published: 31st December, 2019 12:59 IST After ending the season on a positive note with a bowl victory, Mark Dantonio and Michigan State now face a daunting future.That reality was clear Monday when cornerback Josiah Scott announced he was leaving early for the NFL draft. After finishing 7-6 in 2019, the Spartans face questions about their coaching staff, their offensive philosophy and, perhaps most importantly, their talent level. Their“I keep talking to our players about: What is next?” Dantonio said after finishing his 13th season as Michigan State’s coach. “How do you handle your challenges coming down the road for you? That’s how we’ll spring forward. That’s always how we’ve done it.”It was a memorable decade for the Spartans, who won Big Ten titles in 2010, 2013 and 2015 and reached the College Football Playoff in the last of those three seasons. But over the past four seasons, Michigan State is just 27-24.Before this season, Dantonio reshuffled his offensive staff, keeping his assistants but giving them new roles. That didn’t seem to help much. When the Spartans went up against their toughest competition, they were routed by Ohio State (34-10), Wisconsin (38-0), Penn State (28-7) and Michigan (44-10). Dantonio’s own future seemed uncertain, although he said last month he planned to be back. The Spartans avoided an even bigger debacle when they won their last two games of the regular season against Rutgers and Maryland and qualified for the postseason. Then they held Wake Forest scoreless in the second half of the bowl.Pat Narduzzi, Dantonio’s former defensive coordinator who is now the coach at Pittsburgh, was back in Michigan because his team was in the Quick Lane Bowl in Detroit. He said he expects Dantonio’s program to bounce back. “Dantonio will feed off that. That’s what he does. He’s been the underdog for years,” Narduzzi said. “I think what people fail to realize is in the game of football it’s hard to do it year after year.”This was more than one down year, however, and while Dantonio’s team may indeed relish the underdog role, the Spartans have significant losses to deal with. Quarterback Brian Lewerke was a senior, and so were defensive linemen Kenny Willekes, Raequan Williams and Mike Panasiuk. Scott announced his departure“Josiah has been nothing but professional during his time here in East Lansing in how he handles his business, both on and off the field,” Dantonio said in a statement. “We wish him the best.” The Spartans, meanwhile, will move on. Over the past decade, Dantonio has changed the sense of what’s possible at Michigan State. The Spartans were legitimate national title contenders for a few years.That makes the recent decline even more sobering, and as Michigan State sputtered this past season, it was fair to wonder when the program might reach those heights again. For the Spartans and their fans, a 7-6 record was no real cause for celebration.“To me, it’s the basic minimum that you have to do,” Dantonio said. “That’s where this program has come in the last decade. That’s a good thing. You don’t ever want to take anything away from the guys that have accomplished what they’ve done. We’ve had a lot of things go against us this year.” The season opener is at home Sept. 5 against Big Ten foe Northwestern. Written By SUBSCRIBE TO US COMMENT LIVE TVcenter_img Associated Press Television News WATCH US LIVE Last Updated: 31st December, 2019 12:59 IST Spartans Still Face Plenty Of Questions After Bowl Victory After ending the season on a positive note with a bowl victory, Mark Dantonio and Michigan State now face a daunting future. FOLLOW USlast_img read more

T&T government defends gas deal with Venezuela

first_imgThe Trinidad and Tobago government has brushed aside criticisms relating to the new gas agreement it signed with Venezuela over the weekend even as the opposition United National Congress (UNC) called for the terms regarding the price of gas under the accord to be made public.Opposition concerned “We in the Opposition were always concerned with this agreement given the economic hardship being experienced by the Venezuelan government as well as this government’s track-record of incompetence,” said UNC chairman, David Lee.Lee said the party’s concerns have been raised by the failure by Caracas to meet the payments for goods sent to the South American country in recent months.“It is therefore unacceptable and irresponsible that over one year since these questions were first posed and over two years since goods were first shipped to Venezuela manufacturers have not been adequately compensated,” he said.Months of negotiation But Energy Minister, Franklin Khan, told reporters the gas agreement was reached after “months of negotiation, serious intervention, serious sharing of information and serious sharing of economic models, to come up with an appropriate gas price.It is no cheap gas. It is competitively priced gas and is obviously no secret Dragon deal,” Khan said, adding that Venezuela has the largest oil reserves in the world, larger than Saudi Arabia, Russia and the United States and has the fifth largest gas reserves in the world, which this country can benefit from.“It’s a win-win situation, especially since we in Trinidad face challenges on the supply side,” he said, noting that Trinidad and Tobago has world-class gas infrastructure through which Venezuela can monetize its gas.Last Saturday, Prime Minister Dr. Keith Rowley and Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro signed the agreement allowing for the importation of natural gas from Caracas.The terms of the agreement is between the National Gas Company (NGC), the Venezuelan NGC, Shell and the Venezuelan state-owned oil and natural gas company, Petróleos de Venezuela, S.A. (Petroleum of Venezuela).last_img read more