District 7 School Board race going to a runoff

first_img I know you all worked extremely hard, now you got to do it again for the run-off! Got your running shoes on? Moore wins big, but unable to gain a majorityChristine MooreChristine Moore and Matthew Fitzpatrick are heading to a November runoff for the Orange County Public School Board’s District 7 seat that Moore has held for two terms. Moore won a decisive advantage over her opponents with 8,353 votes, but her 45% was not good enough to avoid a runoff. Fitzpatrick, a newcomer to politics, edged retired educator Isadora Dean with 4,589 votes (25%), to Dean’s 4,160 (23%), followed by Laura Rounds with 1,358 votes (7%). TAGSOCPS District 7 Previous articleLive Primary Election ResultsNext articleBlue Darters ranked #1 in AP Poll Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Disappointed mom Christine You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here 4 COMMENTS I’m ready Tenita. Reply Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Fitzpatrick si a Teacher AND knows what needs to be sone! Positive Chango AND Teacher representación to Help SUPPORT Students Is THE need es ingredient… Reply Please enter your name here Mama Mia Lets make decisions with children in mind. Elect Fitzpatrick. Elect people who know what they are talking about because they have “walked the talk”. It is time to trigger positive change.center_img Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter September 1, 2016 at 6:17 am September 3, 2016 at 1:03 pm Reply Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 August 30, 2016 at 9:41 pm UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your comment! Lisa Camacho Szeto August 30, 2016 at 11:48 pm LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replylast_img read more

The Revivalists’ Rob Ingraham Goes Hilariously In-Depth About TODAY Show Experience

first_imgNeo-soul group The Revivalists have a lot to look forward to, as the New Orleans band gets geared up for the Jazz Fest season. Touring on the heels of their recently released Men Amongst Mountains, the band had a unique opportunity last week, when they performed “Wish I Knew You” on The TODAY Show.The Revivalists’ Guide To Surviving Jazz FestWe reached out to the band to hear about their national television debut, and luckily saxophonist Rob Ingraham had planned to write about it all along. Ingraham is the chosen one who keeps up with The Revivalists Tour Blog, which he updates sporadically with stories from the road. A group of seven young men facing the world from their car seats, chasing dreams down the highway, and rightfully landing themselves in places like The TODAY Show are of the monumental stories you will read. The most recent post, “THEY LET US KEEP THE CLOTHES/A STUDY IN PURPLE,” was published on the day of Prince’s death. Enjoy “THEY LET US KEEP THE CLOTHES/A STUDY IN PURPLE,” by Rob Ingraham:Studio 1A, Rockefeller Center, New York, NY. Tuesday, April 12, 2016. 8:30 AM.We take up entirely too much space.It’s not really our fault. We’re a seven-piece band. There isn’t much we could do short of firing someone. Our actual dressing room, a 5’x5′ nook with two chairs and four coat hangers through a door across from one of the makeup stations, can barely accommodate our jackets and backpacks. As is our custom, we have spilled into the common area between all of the various dressing rooms. This is the crossroads, the Great Nexus, the place where all paths converge. Hoda Kotb breezes through the common area and into make-up, easing her pace just long enough to look us over and remark that we “look like trouble.” A few minutes later, she wafts back through the room singing “Love Will Keep Us Together” in honor of Toni Tennille, who has finished her interview and is in her own 5’x5′ nook with two chairs and four coat hangers through a door across from one of the makeup stations waiting for a car to arrive. On my way back from the part of the room where there are bagels, a cameraman waves me through an interview with a woman whom I only later realize had been controversial former NAACP chapter president Rachel Dolezal. At one point, a production assistant approaches us:P.A.: “Are you all with keeping up?”Revs: “[collective hesitation, general confusion]”P.A.: “‘Keeping Up with the Kardashians?’”They didn’t have enough 5’x5′ nooks with two chairs and four coat hangers through doors across from the makeup stations for all of their guests, so “Justified” star Timothy Olyphant and the “second-chance” shelter dogs from the ASPCA both have to make do with sections of the grand foyer just outside of the common area that have been partitioned off with black sheets hanging from tall metal frames. It’s like an off-puttingly cheery version of a scene from a World War II movie at the triage station of a makeshift hospital in a shelled-out cathedral.The program is scheduled down to the minute. At 3:30 AM, our anointed two-man crew heroically ventures to Studio 1A to touch base with the production team and begin setting up our gear. At 5:15 (which, as a rare, bitter twist, is too early for hotel breakfast), we amble over and finish setting up. At the prompting of the ground-level studio’s stage manager, we perform a brief sound check and rehearse an abridged version of “Wish I Knew You” in the gaps between live segments. After this we have an hour or two to nap, eat, or just sort of take up space somewhere and try to make sense of it all. I return to our hotel, a mercifully short walk away, and spend the time doing a crossword puzzle (my new morning ritual when we stay in hotels that stock complimentary copies of USA Today). At 8:00, I get dressed. From the waist down I am wearing clothes I brought with me, and from the waist up I am wearing clothes chosen for me by Robyn Victoria, our stylist for the day.Come to think of it, the most surreal aspect of this whole experience may very well have been the stylist. Not that there was anything particularly odd or unbelievable about Robyn, or her assistant, Jeremiah- they were just two hip young folks who, over the course of about about thirty minutes per band member and armed with two large racks of apparel in an already economically sized hotel room, did a fantastic job of making us look like crisper, more cohesive versions of ourselves. The surreality came from the simple fact that we had a stylist at all. On Saturday, we were playing a frat party in Auburn. On Monday, we were flying into New York early to meet with our stylist. I like to act all cool and unflappable whenever possible, but how could I not be flapped by this?Which brings us back to the beginning of the story. By 8:30, we are all in the common nexus of the green room area, eating bagels and ducking through other people’s interviews and taking up too much space and answering production assistants’ questions with puzzled stares. At some point during this nebulous period we are summoned two or three at a time to makeup, where skilled tradespeople use powdered brushes to disguise the fact that we’re all running on about four hours of sleep. At 10:00 we return to the studio and set our instruments back onto marked positions on the floor, pausing briefly so Kourtney Kardashian can sit down with Kathie Lee and Hoda to talk about a new line of smoothies and the status of her relationship with her sometime-partner Scott Disick (they’re not currently together, but they’re on good terms and they just went on a nice vacation with their children).If, throughout the whole Today experience, I had taken a sip of beer every time I thought to myself “is this real life?” I’d have been too drunk to stand come performance time.At 10:20 Zack and Dave give a brief interview. During the following commercial break, we do a final run-through of the song. At 10:38 (pushed up from 10:48), we do the thing. Our phones explode. The internet trembles. We pack up our gear and decamp from the common area of the green room. We have a celebratory meal nearby with some close friends and a few representatives of our management posse. I curse myself for forgetting to stop in the Nintendo store next to the studio. By 2:30 PM, we and our things are smushed into two SUVs bound for LaGuardia. Two hours later, we’re in the sky, heading home. All told, our trip to New York will amount to roughly twenty-four hours.In the end, despite the vague sense of pressure, the rough hours (even rougher on the real heroes of this story: our crew), and the intimidating, down-to-the-minute schedule, our first foray into national television was a pretty fun adventure. The on-screen personalities at The Today Show were all very good at making us feel at ease, and the behind-the-scenes staff were utterly remarkable in their efficiency, professionalism, and geniality. Plus, it was just kind of cool to get swept up in the pace of this huge, incredible machine and to see what it’s like being a small part of a massive system.These days, most of our shows are just that- our shows- in the sense that when we headline a club, for a brief time our music and our performance becomes the center of a tiny universe. Not that this is a particularly good attitude for any professional to have, but to some degree, if we’re behind schedule, the world is behind schedule. If our time is up but the audience begs for more music, we can play more music. The house lights stay down. The bar stays open. The more we grow as a band, the more things flex and move to accommodate us. Our time on Today was an enjoyable reminder that we, not just as musicians, but as people, are part of a much greater ecosystem; one to which we owe both deference and stewardship.Wardrobe: 5/5Catering: 4/5Hosts: 5/5Crew: 10/5Hours: 3/5Unexpected Philosophical Implications: Numbers are just like, a construct, man…/5Accommodations: 5/5Overall Rating: 5/5 would recommend to others. Special thanks to tastemaker and erstwhile New Orleanian Elvis Duran for showing us so much love.EDIT: Well, shit. I wrote this entry this morning, left my house for a few rehearsals, and by the time I got back home to edit and post it, Prince was dead. What a year. So many heroes are gone. As with David Bowie, part of what I always found inspiring about Prince was how he never compromised. He was perfection personified. Not many people ever have as much control over their own worlds as he did, and even fewer actually manage to do anything good with that kind of authority. Prince was a hundred-year-storm of talent, drive, grace, and authenticity. To paraphrase a quote from Picasso: If he had been a soldier, he would have become a general. If he had been a monk, he would have become the Pope. Instead, he was a musician, and became Prince.Sleep well. Thank you for showing us the way.——————————————————————————————————If you haven’t already, check out the song Rob and David Shaw co-wrote for David Bowie after his passing. Also, watch some of The Revivalists’ most recent tributes to Prince, which will surely continue in the months to come.You can catch the septet performing live in their own city during Jazz Fest both at the fairgrounds and during the late-night shenanigans. While they are scheduled to play the Orpheum Theatre with Vulfpeck and The Soul Rebels on Saturday, April 23, at 9pm (tickets) and at the Gentilly Stage on Friday, April 29 at 3:40pm (tickets), you never know where else the guys will show up masking the spirit of Jazz Fest-ivities. [Photo via The Revivalists Facebook]last_img read more

Delicate touch

first_imgChemists and engineers at Harvard University have fashioned nanowires into a new type of V-shaped transistor small enough to be used for sensitive probing of the interior of cells.The new device, described this week in the journal Science, is smaller than many viruses and about one-hundredth the width of the probes now used to take cellular measurements, which can be nearly as large as the cells themselves. Its slenderness is a marked improvement over these bulkier probes, which can damage cells upon insertion, reducing the accuracy or reliability of any data gained.“Our use of these nanoscale field-effect transistors, or nanoFETs, represents the first totally new approach to intracellular studies in decades, as well as the first measurement of the inside of a cell with a semiconductor device,” says senior author Charles M. Lieber, the Mark Hyman Jr. Professor of Chemistry at Harvard. “The nanoFETs are the first new electrical measurement tool for intracellular studies since the 1960s, during which time electronics have advanced considerably.”Lieber and colleagues say nanoFETs could be used to measure ion flux or electrical signals in cells, particularly neurons. The devices could also be fitted with receptors or ligands to probe for the presence of individual biochemicals within a cell.Human cells can range in size from about 10 microns (millionths of a meter) for nerve cells to 50 microns for cardiac cells. While current probes measure up to 5 microns in diameter, nanoFETs are several orders of magnitude smaller: less than 50 nanometers (billionths of a meter) in total size, with the nanowire probe itself measuring just 15 nanometers in diameter.Aside from their small size, two features allow for easy insertion of nanoFETs into cells. First, Lieber and colleagues found that by coating the structures with a phospholipid bilayer — the same material cell membranes are made of — the devices are easily pulled into a cell via membrane fusion, a process related to that used to engulf viruses and bacteria.“This eliminates the need to push the nanoFETs into a cell, since they are essentially fused with the cell membrane by the cell’s own machinery,” Lieber says. “This also means insertion of nanoFETs is not nearly as traumatic to the cell as current electrical probes. We found that nanoFETs can be inserted and removed from a cell multiple times without any discernible damage to the cell. We can even use them to measure continuously as the device enters and exits the cell.”Secondly, the current paper builds upon previous work by Lieber’s group to introduce triangular “stereocenters” — essentially, fixed 120-degree joints — into nanowires, structures that had previously been rigidly linear. These stereocenters, analogous to the chemical hubs found in many complex organic molecules, introduce kinks into 1-D nanostructures, transforming them into more complex forms.Lieber and his co-authors found that introducing two 120-degree angles into a nanowire in the proper cis orientation creates a single V-shaped 60-degree angle, perfect for a two-pronged nanoFET with a sensor at the tip of the V. The two arms can then be connected to wires to create a current through the nanoscale transistor.Lieber’s co-authors on the Science paper are Bozhi Tian, Tzahi Cohen-Karni, Quan Qing, Xiaojie Duan, and Ping Xie, all of Harvard’s Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The work was sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the McKnight Endowment Fund for Neuroscience.last_img read more

Nearly 200 schools burgled during S.Africa’s virus lockdown

first_imgSouth African authorities on Monday reported that close to 200 schools have being broken into in the first 17 days of a five-week anti-coronavirus lockdown.  Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga said she was “horrified” after it emerged that 183 schools had been burgled since the lockdown came into effect on March 27.”It is extremely disappointing for criminals, … to randomly destroy the same infrastructure meant to provide decent spaces of learning and teaching,” said the minister in a statement. With 73 break-ins, eastern Mpumalanga province recorded the most incidents followed by Gauteng — seat of the capital Pretoria and the economic hub Johannesburg — with 55 robberies.The attacks have ranged from arson, to theft of computers, printers and even classroom chairs, according to local media reports.The rash of school attacks come just days after police minister Bheki Cele reported a dramatic fall in crime since South Africa imposed the coronavirus lockdown, crediting a ban on the sale of alcohol for the drop.In his weekly emailed note, President Cyril Ramaphosa said Monday that “it is a great indictment of our society that dozens of schools have been burgled, trashed or burnt to the ground”. Topics :last_img read more