Finding COVID clues in movement

first_img Battling the ‘pandemic of misinformation’ You can have outdoor fun in the COVID era, Chan School expert says, but keep your distance Americans are weary of lockdowns, but if COVID surges, what then? A summer like no other This is part of our Coronavirus Update series in which Harvard specialists in epidemiology, infectious disease, economics, politics, and other disciplines offer insights into what the latest developments in the COVID-19 outbreak may bring.Harvard scientists are leading a global research network that is using data from mobile devices and social media to document people’s movements during the COVID-19 outbreak and translate that information to help government officials set pandemic policy worldwide.The effort, called the COVID-19 Mobility Data Network, involves about 60 academic research labs working with officials in the U.S., U.K., Canada, Mexico, India, Bangladesh, The Netherlands, and Colombia, and seeks to fill what organizers see as a gap between potentially useful data that scientists are gathering and policymakers’ need for targeted information as they make pandemic decisions that can affect people’s lives and livelihoods.“When COVID happened and it became clear that the only interventions available to us were social-distancing interventions, travel restrictions, and so on, it became clear that we needed to process this mobility data in a way to provide insights for policymakers that would help them evaluate the situation and monitor what was going on with social distancing in their area,” said Caroline Buckee, associate professor of epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.Buckee leads the effort with Satchit Balsari, assistant professor of emergency medicine at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Medical Center and assistant professor of global health and population at the Harvard Chan School, and Andrew Schroeder, vice president at the nonprofit humanitarian aid organization Direct Relief.“This data is not trivial to interpret,” Buckee said. “It is a proxy for what we want to measure, which is the contact rate, but it isn’t the contact rate. So it’s really important that we don’t just say, ‘Here’s a public dashboard of stuff,’ because interpretation, careful methods, rigorous analysis in the context of specific policy needs is really important.”With that goal, Buckee said, researchers work with specific national, state, and local governments, providing daily or near-daily reports tailored to the needs of policymakers. The reports show areas where movement of individuals rose or fell and whether that might indicate a problem emerging or easing.“What we’re providing is very much tailored to a specific [government official]: what they need in that place,” Buckee said.For example, Buckee said, New York City officials may want specific neighborhood-level data, or to understand whether people are moving — seen via mobility data — between two specific neighborhoods and whether, over time, those connections are changing.Balsari said that the reports also provide important contextualization. A 15 percent decline in mobility in a smaller city, for example, may be enough to curb the coronavirus’ spread there. In Boston, however, with a larger, denser population and heavy use of public transit, even a 30 percent decline, though numerically better, may not have the same effect. Related Experts are thinking through the options as a jump is possible in fall Ubiquity of social media has made it easier to spread or even create COVID-19 falsehoods, making the work of public health officials harder “The contextualization of this is key,” Balsari said. “The vision here is that this will vary not only by where on the epidemic curve we are, but also what places we’re talking about.”The work builds on prior research by Buckee and Balsari that used mobile phone data for a variety of public health and global health purposes. Balsari’s work uses mobility data to inform disaster response and population health, while Buckee’s work examines mobility and infectious disease patterns. The two recently collaborated on work finding that deaths from all causes linked to Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico put the overall toll as much as 70 times higher than the official estimate.Balsari and Buckee said data privacy is an important concern in the network’s efforts. The COVID-19 mobility data is aggregated and anonymized to protect privacy more effectively than data provided by some commercial companies seeking to provide similar services to the government. The two said the use of this data represents a major step forward in using publicly available data to inform crisis response, akin to the revolution in crisis mapping and use of satellite imagery after the 2010 Haiti earthquake.Though states around the country — the network is advising 20 of them — and nations around the world are emerging from initial society-wide lockdowns, Buckee said mobility data is still relevant. Officials are eager for information about how and where people are moving as society reopens. That information may prove crucial in shaping more targeted future responses, by pairing public health data with mobility information to see where population movement is linked to rising coronavirus case counts.“We’ve shown commuting patterns correlate with seroprevalence in New York,” Buckee said. “As we see reopening, if there are places that are going to be active, we can pick that up in real time as opposed to waiting for deaths to surge several weeks later. … The reality is that a lot of places have plans to reopen despite a lack of good surveillance, and that is deeply problematic. This kind of data can at least provide you some information about what you can expect down the road.”last_img read more

Notre Dame community members discuss racial issues, love

first_imgMembers of the Notre Dame community gathered in the Joyce Center on Tuesday to celebrate and honor Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, hearing from a panel entitled “A Call to Love: Bridging the Racial Divide.” Speakers discussed racial issues both in the world  and at Notre Dame, reflecting on how love and hope can help mend divides among groups. The panel was moderated by Jennifer Mason McAward, director of the Klau Center for Civil and Human Rights and associate professor of law. The panelists were Rev. Hugh Page, vice president and associate provost of undergraduate affairs; Rev. Peter McCormick, C.S.C., director of Campus Ministry; Ernest Morrell, director of the Center for Literacy Education; Notre Dame senior Alyssa Ngo; professor of art Maria Tomasula; and third-year law student Cameasha Turner. McAward began the discussion by giving a general definition of racism and asked the panel what they believe racism to be and how they see its manifestation in society. “Bigotry involves individual, interpersonal acts of meanness, based on a recipient’s racial, ethnic or cultural identity,” McAward said. “Racism refers to the systematic distribution of resources, power and opportunity in our society to the benefit of people who are white and the exclusion of people of color.”Ngo drew the distinction between individualized racism and systemic racism, stating that people should realize that the type of racism that most permeates society is systemic. “In terms of a systemic, institutionalized matter of discrimination, that’s what we’re talking about when we’re talking about racism … and I think it’s important that we get that definition on the table,” she said.Morrell agreed with Ngo but countered that individual racism is what perpetuates the cycle of hate throughout the years.“It’s the thoughts that individuals have that undergird the system … Our thoughts about others, our perceptions about others, that undergirds the system. While I would agree that racism is systemic, it is only sustainable because of individuals’ thoughts and actions in our society,” Morrell said. The panel then moved on to discussing the Inclusive Campus Climate Survey, focusing on the fact that 47 percent of students did not agree that Notre Dame demonstrated an authentic commitment to diversity. “There is no shortage of work to do in every aspect of life that we have here,” Page said.“When we think about this mission and tradition, it comes back to who’s making these decisions,” McCormick said. “If we believe our mission to be robust enough that it can enlighten hearts and minds and that other people from varying perspectives can come and take it and amplify it, in my estimation, we should strive in every way to allow that to be accomplished.”In addition, Turner discussed the disparity between the values taught in the Christian tradition and the action taken by churchgoers. “I challenge, not only the students, the faculty to re-examine what it means to be a Christian and not just attend Mass, not just attend church and be okay in that moment, but to actually leave church, to leave these panel discussions and implement what we talked about, what the pastor preached and what the priest told us,” Turner said. The conversation then turned to King’s provocative quote, “I have decided to stick with love. Hate is too great a burden to bear,” and discussing how love affects the movement to end racism. “If you take the lead of Dr. King and embrace the idea of a commitment to love and a commitment to justice, then that really is a demanding call that requires both soul-searching and, really, truth-telling,” Morrell said. Tomasula echoed Morrell’s idea of love that requires action and hard work. “For me, love that doesn’t move beyond a feeling, that’s fine, but not that useful and not that useful for a struggle that Dr. King was engaged in,” Tomasula said. “However, as I said, love can take many forms, and love that takes the form of action seems to be the sort of love that’s needed.” The panel then moved to talk about the next steps to combat racism both at the University and in the world. Ngo cautioned against simply using prayer as an excuse to stay complacent in the fight for racial justice. “We are instruments of God’s plan on Earth, and so if we are praying to God to end racism, how are we acting as instruments to end racism,” she said.McCormick echoed this point, saying that people should not pick and choose when to be involved in the anti-racist movement, but rather fully commit to the cause.“How is it, then, that we encounter one another, learn from one another, engage one another, educate one another, because something beautiful is possible,” McCormick said. “But when we hold back and only choose to opt in here or there or when we choose, something is lost in the process.”The conversation ended with panelists expressing their hopes for the future of equality despite the despair that often arises due to the sheer volume of the task ahead. “I have hope because we’re here,” Page said. “I have hope because of this panel. I have hope because of Walk the Walk Week, not only because of what it represents in terms of our concrete steps to build positive relationships with one another and to engage in a soul-searching, transformational world that will help us live into the aspirations that we have, but also that we are in the process of building things that will stand the test of time and survive all of us. Walk the Walk Week is an institutional investment in the creation of structures that will survive even without those of us that are here.”Tags: Call to Love panel, martin luther king jr. day, Racism, Walk the Walk Weeklast_img read more

Saint Mary’s students react to renewed indoor dining by reservation, introduction of plexiglass partitions

first_imgIn past years, campus dining at Saint Mary’s consisted of students cramming almost 12 people around a table, enjoying meals and studying for hours on end.Since August, dining at Saint Mary’s has looked a little different — students laying out blankets, eating on the grass or dining in a tent on the Student Center lot. Some students eat their meals in the dorm lounges or even in their rooms. The College’s dining experience is changing once again, following a Sept. 30 email from dean of student academic services Karen Chambers, announcing a return to indoor dining. The email explained if students wish to dine inside, they are to make reservations through PRISM — similar to signing up for a class — and are expected to appear within the designated block of time.Students are now able to dine indoors with four to a table behind plexiglass barriers separating them from each other. While some students said they are grateful for the effort put forth, others are struggling to adapt to the new dining experience.Sophomore Erin Dotson emphasized that the plexiglass barriers are an impediment to having an enjoyable conversation.“You can hear your voice reverberating through the glass, and it’s incredibly difficult to hear while trying to have conversations with your friend group, even when at the same table,” Dotson said.Though indoor dining options offer an opportunity to escape the cooler weather, the glass partitions look strange and separate friends from each other, first year Emerson Henry said.“I think it’s great to have indoor dining again since it’s getting cold, but I am also not a fan of the plexiglass,” Henry said. “It’s kind of hard to hear with the plexiglass, especially for being hearing impaired.”As the days get colder and more individuals might wish to eat inside, Henry said she’s worried the limited seating space might create problems for the student body.“We want to eat inside, but it’s just going to get harder as it’s gets colder and people are going to fight for tables,” she said.Juniors Isabella Thompson-Davoli and Sarah Frick agreed that the half-hour time slots provide another challenge, as normally meals are very casual and people tend to meet up at arbitrary times.“It is very difficult to plan and stay on a strict schedule of exactly when we should eat,” Frick said.Thompson-Davoli and Frick said they think a better approach would be to have a restaurant-like system, where a host directs you to a table, instead of the current system which requires that one abide by a strict schedule and routine.“The limit of only four people to a table due to the plexiglass barriers was difficult,” Thompson-Davoli said.Some students voiced concerns about the elimination of the ice cream machine, which was considered a dining hall staple in previous years.“I was expecting dining to be a focal point of where you meet your friends, where you interact and see other people that you didn’t see during the day,” first-year Reese Bauer said. “[The dining hall is] supposed to be a place to get away from any social drama or stress that we’re feeling and a place to just relax. Especially during COVID, there is no way to ‘get away,’ and this can’t serve as a getting away place either.”Despite these difficulties, Dotson said she is happy to have the opportunity to eat indoors again.“I think the efforts put forth by the school are taken into consideration,” she said. “If they forced us to eat in our rooms, then I wouldn’t be able to do that. They are putting forth an effort and I am grateful.”Tags: Campus DIning, covid precautions, Noble Family Dining Halllast_img read more

Odds & Ends: Bette Midler Reacts to Beaches Casting & More

first_img Star Files Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed from today. Bette Midler Finally Reacts to Idina Menzel’s Beaches CastingIdina Menzel can breathe easy…Bette Midler, the original CC Bloom in Beaches, has approved the Broadway supernova taking on the role in Lifetime’s upcoming remake! The Divine Miss M tweeted: “Can’t wait to see Idina Menzel as CC in Lifetime’s Beaches! DON’T TELL ME THE ENDING!” Spoiler alert: she’ll need tissues! Meanwhile, Midler herself is keeping busy—she is scheduled to begin previews at the Shubert Theatre in Hello, Dolly on March 13, 2017.Nikki M. James, Jose Llana & More Set for Twelfth NightTony winner Nikki M. James will play Viola, alongside Jose Llana as Orsino, Andrew Kober as Malvolio, Jacob Ming-Trent as Sir Toby Belch and Shaina Taub as Feste in the Public Theater’s upcoming musical adaptation of Twelfth Night. Directed by Kwame Kwei-Armah, who co-conceived the venture with the production’s composer and lyricist Taub, 200 New Yorkers from all five boroughs will also share the Delacorte stage for the event. Part of the global 400th anniversary celebration of William Shakespeare’s life and death, the show is scheduled to run September 2 through September 5.Will Chase Roasts Lin-Manuel Miranda in #Bard4HamSpeaking of the Bard, at #Ham4Ham on August 3, Shakespeare himself, A.K.A. Something Rotten!’s Will Chase, joined Hamilton’s Rory O’Malley to convince Lin-Manuel Miranda to “Take a Break.” Check out #Bard4Ham below. Happy hump day! Bette Midler Will Chase Bette Midler(Photo: Jonathan Pushnik) Idina Menzel View Commentslast_img read more

National 4-H Congress

first_img“We haven’t abandoned our agricultural roots,” Stewart said. “We’ve expanded theaudience we serve.” “We want them to see the new South. This is a progressive region with the best ourcountry has to offer in climate, industry and agriculture,” she said. “We have shown acooperation of mutual respect between agriculture and business. And that link is clearin Atlanta. National 4-H Congress brings together 4-H’ers from across the nation and U.S.territories. The teens will discuss challenges they will face in the future and will searchfor solutions. National Congress also has changed to mirror the changing face of 4-H. One big part of the learning experience of the event is community service. “Experiential learning works whether you’re raising a steer in Hahira or a backyardgarden in Decatur,” Stewart said. “We’ve found urban and suburban applications foragriculture. And we’ve established 4-H as the premiere organization teachingleadership and citizenship to America’s youth.” “What better place to teach service and diversity than ‘Atlanta: The City Too Busy toHate’?” Stewart said. “That’s a vital message these young people need to take home.” The Congress convenes the day after Thanksgiving each year. It lasts for four days. Using the lessons of the past 80 years, National 4-H Congress combines its youngmembers’ leadership, citizenship and technological skills. And it puts them to work. “This program will give us an opportunity to unite young people from a multiculturalbase to network, discuss youth issues and establish relationships they will build on forthe rest of their lives,” Stewart said. “Atlanta will be a part of that.” “Plus, Atlanta offers gracious living you can’t get any other place in the world,” shesaid. “National 4-H Council determined that (as it was), it could no longer be funded,”Stewart said. “After National Council abandoned sponsorship, states picked it up andredefined the mission as an educational experience. They strengthened the programfrom just a recognition event.” “National 4-H Congress began as a recognition program for outstanding performance inproject areas,” said Susan Stewart, who coordinates the event. 4-H reaches city and suburban kids in the same way it reached rural students at the turnof the century. Georgia’s 4-H reputation helped land National Congress in Atlanta. “It still is,” said Stewart, a UGA 4-H specialist. “But it has expanded to be aneducational experience that exceeds the scope of what any one state could offer.” Stewart hopes the students won’t leave without a good dose of Southern hospitality. The big event almost ended in 1994. “We now hope National 4-H Congress will help us spotlight Georgia’s outstandingprogram,” Ryles said. “We hope it will introduce 4-H to a new generation ofGeorgians.” The Congress will bring more than 1,200 young people to the city each year. It won’t be another Olympics. It will be a big deal, however, to thousands of youngAmericans. For four years starting in 1998, Atlanta will be the host city for theNational 4-H Congress. A site selection committee made the announcement this week. With more than 5.5 million members (more than 170,000 in Georgia), 4-H reaches anever-changing population. It now includes 1 million city dwellers and more than 2million suburbanites. Only a little more than 700,000 live on farms. About 24 percentare minorities. “National 4-H Congress is the premiere event for 4-H across our country,” said BoRyles, state 4-H leader with the University of Georgia Extension Service. “Citiesnationwide bid for the Congress. We’re thrilled the committee chose Atlanta.”last_img read more

CVPS, DPS agree on smaller rate increase of 7.67 percent

first_imgCentral Vermont Public Service (NYSE-CV) and the Vermont Department of Public Service have agreed to a rate settlement that will reduce a November rate request.Driven by reliability and transmission improvements and increasing power costs, in November CVPS asked the Vermont Public Service Board to authorize an 8.34 percent rate increase under the company’s alternative regulation plan. CVPS and the DPS have agreed to reduce the increase, which is expected to take effect Jan. 1, to 7.67 percent. The agreement also amends and extends the company’s alternative regulation plan.Under the settlement, which must be approved by the PSB, the company’s allowed return on equity would remain at the current level of 9.59 percent. CVPS agreed to reduce its return on equity request and make an additional $13 million investment in the Vermont Electric Power Company by the end of the year, changes that reduced the size of the rate increase.Even with the increase, CVPS states that its rates will remain among the lowest of the major utilities in New England.Under the proposed base rate change, a residential customer using 500 kilowatt-hours per month would experience a $5.91 increase, from $78.11 to $84.02. By comparison, the same customer would pay as much as $121.80 elsewhere in New England, according to the Edison Electric Institute.Since 1999, CVPS rates have risen at a fraction of the rate of inflation in the energy sector, with a handful of increases and decreases, including a 1.15 percent decrease in July. Overall, rates in 2011 are expected to be 21.8 percent higher than in 1999. Based on the latest federal data available, the Consumer Price Index for Energy has increased 81 percent.‘We have worked hard to mitigate the need for a rate increase, and are pleased that the VELCO investment will help reduce the impact on customers,’ President Bob Young said. ‘The increase is driven in large part by increases in power costs and a large increase for reliability improvements and regional transmission costs.‘I wish we could forego an increase, but we must continue to invest in our systems and pay our share of regional transmission costs,’ Young said. ‘While it doesn’t eliminate the impact, I am proud to say we will continue to provide a value that is extremely competitive in the region, even after the increase.’Other Vermont utilities have received rate increases ranging from 3.11 percent to as much as 30.76 percent in the past 8 months.The new rates will serve as the base rates for 2011 under CVPS’s amended alternative regulation framework. Under the plan, CVPS’s rates are adjusted up or down every quarter to account for specified changes in power costs, and annually for specified changes in other costs and earnings.Source: CVPS. 12.22.2010last_img read more

Djokovic wins compliment from Lebron James for basketball skills

first_imgNovak Djokovic has charmed many over the years with his exploits on the tennis courts but the men’s world number one now also has an admirer of his basketball skills in American great LeBron James.Djokovic, who has been busy organising an exhibition tennis tournament in the Balkan region while the professional season is suspended due to the novel coronavirus, posted a video of himself trying some basketball moves on social media.Am I ready for a 1:1 @KingJames? 💪🏼 pic.twitter.com/78MwBZaAiS— Novak Djokovic (@DjokerNole) June 20, 2020The video, addressed to James, shows the 33-year-old Djokovic taking a few dribbles before knocking down a mid-range jumpshot. “Am I ready for a 1:1 @KingJames?” asked Djokovic, who previously termed Kobe Bryant, the 18-time NBA All-Star who died in a helicopter crash in January, a great mentor and friend.The NBA star did not take long to respond.”Ha! I’m going to say I think you are!! Beautiful follow-thru on that shot buddy!” James said in his reply on Twitter.Topics :last_img read more

Governor Wolf Announces Pennsylvania Cherry to Create 42 New Jobs in Franklin County

first_img Economy,  Jobs That Pay,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf announced that Pennsylvania Cherry LLC, a manufacturer of kiln-dried hardwood cherry, will establish operations in Mercersburg Borough, Franklin County, and will create more than 40 new Pennsylvania jobs.“Pennsylvania’s excellent location, abundance of natural resources, and prime business climate made the commonwealth the perfect site to establish Pennsylvania Cherry, and we’re excited to welcome the company here,” Governor Wolf said. “The company’s decision to establish roots here is more evidence that our state is the best choice for manufacturers who are looking at several locations to set up shop.”Pennsylvania Cherry was formed after conducting a site search of several states to determine the best location to establish operations in the northeast U.S for kiln drying locally-sourced hardwood. After selecting Pennsylvania and forming Pennsylvania Cherry, the company acquired a facility in Mercersburg. The project includes land and building acquisition, infrastructure development, machinery and equipment purchase, and job training. The company has committed to invest more than $15 million in the project, and will create 42 new jobs in the next three years.“We are very excited with the establishment of Pennsylvania Cherry, LLC and look forward to continuing the excellent relationship we have developed with the state of Pennsylvania and Mercersburg Borough in this new venture,” said Hong Hong Chen, CEO of Pennsylvania Cherry. “The choice of Pennsylvania and, specifically, Mercersburg as the location for this new facility was based on the natural resources in this area that are critical to our success as well as the availability of multiple transportation options. The hospitality shown to us by the state and local community were very much appreciated and were also important to our selection of a site. We sincerely appreciate all of the assistance we have received from everyone we have met and worked with through this process.”Pennsylvania Cherry received a funding proposal from the Department of Community and Economic Development for $126,000 in Job Creation Tax Credits to be distributed upon creation of the new jobs and $16,650 in WEDnetPA funding for employee training. The company has also been encouraged to apply for a $2.1 million low-interest loan from the Pennsylvania Industrial Development Authority (PIDA) to assist with building and equipment costs.The project was coordinated by the Governor’s Action Team, an experienced group of economic development professionals who report directly to the governor and work with businesses that are considering locating or expanding in Pennsylvania, in collaboration with the Franklin County Area Development Corporation (FCADC).“This project is the result of a truly collaborative effort between Pennsylvania Cherry, the Governor’s Action Team, and the FCADC,” said L. Michael Ross, president of FCADC. “Not only will the project create upwards of 50 new full-time jobs, it will redevelop a property that has sat vacant for the last two years.”For more information about the Governor’s Action Team or DCED, visit dced.pa.gov, and be sure to stay up-to-date with all of our agency news on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. April 10, 2018 Governor Wolf Announces Pennsylvania Cherry to Create 42 New Jobs in Franklin Countycenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Private debt activity slowed sharply in 2019, but 2020 starts crowded

first_imgFundraising and deal-making in the private debt market declined sharply last year although fund managers have kept launching new vehicles, according to data provider Preqin.In 2019, 152 funds reached a final close, securing a combined $107bn (€96bn) from investors, the lowest annual total since 2015 and an 11% decrease compared with 2018.Last year marked the first time since 2014 that the industry did not cross the 200 and $100bn thresholds for fund closes and fundraising volumes, according to Preqin.There were 830 private debt-backed deals with an aggregate value of $48bn in 2019, marking the end of a steady rise in the number of deals and aggregate deal value since 2009. At the beginning of this month there are 436 funds in the market targeting a combined $192bn, compared with 399 and $168bn in January 2019, respectively, and 354 and $169bn at the start of 2018.“Suggestions that the [private debt] market has reached saturation are not fully substantiated, but many investors do seem to be holding off on making commitments, and fundraising has seen its largest ever year-on-year decline,” said Tom Carr, head of private debt at Preqin.“But long-term appetite among investors remains robust, and fund managers certainly believe that there is significant potential yet to be tapped. They will point to declining dry powder as an indication that they are still able to put capital to work, and this may prompt investors to start making commitments again and boosting 2020 fundraising activity.”BNPP AM partners with German SME loan originatorIn other news, BNP Paribas Asset Management (BNPP AM) has added a Germany prong to its small and medium-sized (SME) alternative financing platform, partnering with German digital SME finance provider platform creditshelf.Creditshelf will originate unsecured SME loans between €500,000 and €5m with a term of five to eight year for BNPP AM’s institutional investor clients. The asset manager will make the final credit decision on the loans.Stéphane Blanchoz, head of BNPP AM’s SME alternative financing business, said: “Our partnership with creditshelf will allow us to bring our unique SME loan product to the German market, alongside our existing offering in the UK and the Netherlands.”Banks in Germany do not typically offer terms of five to eight years for unsecured growth financing, noted Daniel Bartsch, founding partner and board member of creditshelf.BNPP AM’s SME alternative financing platform is part of the asset manager’s private debt and real assets investment group. It already has strategic partnerships with origination platforms CODE Investing and Caple; it has a 10% stake in the latter. In 2018 there were nearly 1,400 deals with a total deal value of more than $75bn.center_img Dry powder fell from a peak of $292bn at the end of 2018 to $261bn as of December 2019. This marks the first time the cash pile shrank since 2014 as fund managers deployed capital at a faster pace than they raised it during the year.However, new funds continue to be launched and the marketplace is more crowded than it has been since 2017, according to Preqin’s data.last_img read more

Cross Country Academic All-State

first_imgBatesville Cross Country Runners Calvin Lehman, Kelsey Gausman and Molly Weigel were selected to the IATCCC First Team Academic All-State for Cross Country.To qualify, the student-athlete must be a junior or senior on the tournament roster, have a 3.5 or better GPA and score 1200 or better on the 2 parts of SAT OR above a 28 on the ACT.Congratulations to the three of them for their efforts in the classroom as well as the team!Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Lisa Gausman.last_img